opprobrious


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op·pro·bri·ous

 (ə-prō′brē-əs)
adj.
1. Expressing contemptuous reproach; scornful or abusive: opprobrious epithets.
2. Bringing disgrace; shameful or infamous: opprobrious conduct.

op·pro′bri·ous·ly adv.

opprobrious

(əˈprəʊbrɪəs)
adj
1. expressing scorn, disgrace, or contempt
2. shameful or infamous
opˈprobriously adv
opˈprobriousness n

op•pro•bri•ous

(əˈproʊ bri əs)

adj.
1. conveying or expressing opprobrium, as language or a speaker.
2. disgraceful or shameful.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin]
op•pro′bri•ous•ly, adv.
op•pro′bri•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.opprobrious - expressing offensive reproachopprobrious - expressing offensive reproach  
offensive - causing anger or annoyance; "offensive remarks"
2.opprobrious - (used of conduct or character) deserving or bringing disgrace or shameopprobrious - (used of conduct or character) deserving or bringing disgrace or shame; "Man...has written one of his blackest records as a destroyer on the oceanic islands"- Rachel Carson; "an ignominious retreat"; "inglorious defeat"; "an opprobrious monument to human greed"; "a shameful display of cowardice"
dishonorable, dishonourable - lacking honor or integrity; deserving dishonor; "dishonorable in thought and deed"

opprobrious

adjective
1. Of, relating to, or characterized by verbal abuse:
2. Meriting or causing shame or dishonor:
Translations

opprobrious

[əˈprəʊbrɪəs] ADJ (frm) → oprobioso

opprobrious

adj invective, remarkverächtlich, schmähend; conductschändlich, schandhaft, schimpflich
References in classic literature ?
Nor content with such Audacious neighbourhood, the wisest heart Of SOLOMON he led by fraud to build His Temple right against the Temple of God On that opprobrious Hill, and made his Grove The pleasant Vally of HINNOM, TOPHET thence And black GEHENNA call'd, the Type of Hell.
As they had first landed, they had suffered the first transports of the bassa's passion, who was a violent, tyrannical man, and would have killed his own brother for the least advantage--a temper which made him fly into the utmost rage at seeing us poor, tattered, and almost naked; he treated us with the most opprobrious language, and threatened to cut off our heads.
The savages went off uttering the wildest denunciations of hostility, mingled with opprobrious terms in broken English, and gesticulations of the most insulting kind.
The housekeeper retired, with a manner but little less dignified, as she thought, than the air of the heiress, muttering as she drew the door after her, with a noise like the report of a musket, the opprobrious terms of “drunkard,” “sot,” and “ beast.
The sight of any of the natives put him in an absolute fury, and he would heap on them the most opprobrious epithets; recollecting, no doubt, what he had suffered from Indian robbers.
When I meet a dog of my acquaintance I slap his head, call him opprobrious epithets, and roll him over on his back; and there he lies, gaping at me, and doesn't mind it a bit.
She kept on, with hysterical violence, shouting at him an opprobrious, filthy epithet.
He will tell you, it is all pfuscherei, which is his most opprobrious word
Robson leant upon his gun, and laughed excessively at the violence of his nephew's passion, and the bitter maledictions and opprobrious epithets he heaped upon me.
They seized one another by the garments, the hair, the beard--fought like animals, cursed, shouted, called one another opprobrious and obscene names.
All calculations were in his favour; but, chance being incalculable, he fell upon an individuality whom it is much easier to define by opprobrious names than to classify in a calm and scientific spirit--but an individuality certainly, and a temperament as well.
He called the panther every opprobrious name that fell to his tongue.