optic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

op·tic

 (ŏp′tĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the eye or vision.
2. Of or relating to the science of optics or optical equipment.
n.
1. An eye.
2. Any of the lenses, prisms, or mirrors of an optical instrument.

[Middle English optik, from Old French optique, from Medieval Latin opticus, from Greek optikos, from optos, visible; see okw- in Indo-European roots.]

optic

(ˈɒptɪk)
adj
1. (Anatomy) of or relating to the eye or vision
2. (General Physics) a less common word for optical
n
an informal word for eye1
[C16: from Medieval Latin opticus, from Greek optikos, from optos visible, seen; related to ōps eye]

Optic

(ˈɒptɪk)
n
trademark Brit a device attached to an inverted bottle for dispensing measured quantities of liquid, such as whisky, gin, etc

op•tic

(ˈɒp tɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the eye or sight.
n.
2. Usu. optics, the eye.
3. a lens of an optical instrument.
[1535–45; < Medieval Latin opticus < Greek optikós, derivative of opt(ós) seen, v. adj. of ópsesthai to see]

op·tic

(ŏp′tĭk)
Relating to the eye or vision.

optic

Relating to the eye.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.optic - the organ of sightoptic - the organ of sight      
sense organ, sensory receptor, receptor - an organ having nerve endings (in the skin or viscera or eye or ear or nose or mouth) that respond to stimulation
visual system - the sensory system for vision
naked eye - the eye unaided by any optical instrument that alters the power of vision or alters the apparent size or distance of objects; "it is not safe to look directly at the sun with the naked eye"
peeper - an informal term referring to the eye
oculus dexter, OD - the right eye
oculus sinister, OS - the left eye
ocellus, simple eye, stemma - an eye having a single lens
compound eye - in insects and some crustaceans: composed of many light-sensitive elements each forming a portion of an image
choroid, choroid coat - a highly vascular membrane in the eye between the retina and the sclera; a dark pigmentation minimizes the scattering of light inside the eye
ciliary body - the part of the tunic of the eye between the choroid coat and the iris; "the ciliary body produces aqueous humor"
eyelid, lid, palpebra - either of two folds of skin that can be moved to cover or open the eye; "his lids would stay open no longer"
canthus - either of the corners of the eye where the upper and lower eyelids meet
epicanthic fold, epicanthus - a vertical fold of skin over the nasal canthus; normal for Mongolian peoples; sometimes occurs in Down's syndrome
nictitating membrane, third eyelid - a protective fold of skin in the eyes of reptiles and birds and some mammals
conjunctiva - a transparent lubricating mucous membrane that covers the eyeball and the under surface of the eyelid
eyeball, orb - the ball-shaped capsule containing the vertebrate eye
eye muscle, ocular muscle - one of the small muscles of the eye that serve to rotate the eyeball
cornea - the transparent dome-shaped anterior portion of the outer covering of the eye; it covers the iris and pupil and is continuous with the sclera
uvea - the part of the eye that contains the iris and ciliary body and choroid
uveoscleral pathway - a tubule that drains excess aqueous humor
iris - muscular diaphragm that controls the size of the pupil which in turn controls the amount of light that enters the eye; it forms the colored portion of the eye
crystalline lens, lens of the eye, lens - biconvex transparent body situated behind the iris in the eye; its role (along with the cornea) is to focuses light on the retina
arteria centralis retinae, central artery of the retina - a branch of the ophthalmic artery; enters the eyeball with the optic nerve
arteria ciliaris, ciliary artery - one of several arteries supplying the choroid coat of the eye
arteria lacrimalis, lacrimal artery - an artery that originates from the ophthalmic artery and supplies the lacrimal gland and rectal eye muscles and the upper eyelid and the forehead
lacrimal vein, vena lacrimalis - drains the lacrimal gland; empties into the superior ophthalmic vein
lacrimal apparatus - the structures that secrete and drain tears from the eye
retina - the innermost light-sensitive membrane covering the back wall of the eyeball; it is continuous with the optic nerve
sclera, sclerotic coat - the whitish fibrous membrane (albuginea) that with the cornea forms the outer covering and protection of the eyeball
musculus sphincter pupillae, pupillary sphincter - a ring of smooth muscle surrounding the iris
face, human face - the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear; "he washed his face"; "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
aperture - a natural opening in something
Adj.1.optic - of or relating to or resembling the eye; "ocular muscles"; "an ocular organ"; "ocular diseases"; "the optic (or optical) axis of the eye"; "an ocular spot is a pigmented organ or part believed to be sensitive to light"
2.optic - relating to or using sightoptic - relating to or using sight; "ocular inspection"; "an optical illusion"; "visual powers"; "visual navigation"

optic

adjective
Serving, resulting from, or relating to the sense of sight:
Translations
szem

optic

[ˈɒptɪk] ADJóptico
optic nervenervio m óptico

optic

adjoptisch

optic

[ˈɒptɪk] adjottico/a

op·tic

, optical
a. óptico-a, rel. a la visión;
___ diskdisco ___, punto ciego de la retina;
___ illusionilusión ___;
___ nervenervio ___.
References in classic literature ?
But, on the other hand, they connect diagonally, and the sprawling outlines run off in great slanting waves of optic horror, like a lot of wallowing seaweeds in full chase.
He scarce had ceas't when the superiour Fiend Was moving toward the shore; his ponderous shield Ethereal temper, massy, large and round, Behind him cast; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the Moon, whose Orb Through Optic Glass the TUSCAN Artist views At Ev'ning from the top of FESOLE, Or in VALDARNO, to descry new Lands, Rivers or Mountains in her spotty Globe.
To her the atoms of life were magnified by an optic peculiar to persons who are selfish by nature or self-absorbed by some accident.
There's no tint of pain, real pain, in the sensations of the optic nerve.
The light from it had beat upon his sealed lids, and the eyes and the optic nerves had pulsated to little, sparklike flashes, warm-coloured and strangely pleasing.
He brought our Saviour to the western side Of that high mountain, whence he might behold Another plain, long, but in breadth not wide, Washed by the southern sea, and on the north To equal length backed with a ridge of hills That screened the fruits of the earth and seats of men From cold Septentrion blasts; thence in the midst Divided by a river, off whose banks On each side an Imperial City stood, With towers and temples proudly elevate On seven small hills, with palaces adorned, Porches and theatres, baths, aqueducts, Statues and trophies, and triumphal arcs, Gardens and groves, presented to his eyes Above the highth of mountains interposed-- By what strange parallax, or optic skill Of vision, multiplied through air, or glass Of telescope, were curious to enquire.
In the Articulata we can commence a series with an optic nerve merely coated with pigment, and without any other mechanism; and from this low stage, numerous gradations of structure, branching off in two fundamentally different lines, can be shown to exist, until we reach a moderately high stage of perfection.
In the common mole the eye is extraordinarily small but perfect, though many anatomists doubt whether it is connected with the true optic nerve; its vision must certainly be imperfect, though probably useful to the animal when it leaves its burrow.
There was a morning when Aileen tripped in to work with a slightly bruised eye; and Tildy's solicitude was almost enough to heal any optic.
And it seemed to me that his eyes were strange, not only the expression, but the physical seeming, as though the optic nerves and supporting muscles had suffered strain and slightly twisted the eyeballs.
Just as a photographic plate receives a different impression of a cluster of stars when a telescope is part of the intervening medium, so a brain receives a different impression when an eye and an optic nerve are part of the intervening medium.
She screwed her dim optics to their acutest point, in the hope of making out, with greater distinctness, a certain window, where she half saw, half guessed, that a tailor's seamstress was sitting at her work.