optics


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op·tics

 (ŏp′tĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The branch of physics that deals with light and vision, chiefly the generation, propagation, and detection of electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths greater than x-rays and shorter than microwaves.
2. (used with a pl. verb) Informal The way a situation or action appears to the general public: Voters were put off by the optics of the candidate's financial dealings.

optics

(ˈɒptɪks)
n
(General Physics) (functioning as singular) the branch of science concerned with vision and the generation, nature, propagation, and behaviour of electromagnetic light

op•tics

(ˈɒp tɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the branch of physical science that deals with the properties and phenomena of both visible and invisible light and with vision.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin optica < Greek optiká,optikós; see optic, -ics]

op·tics

(ŏp′tĭks)
The scientific study of light and vision.

optics

The study of light and its uses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.optics - the branch of physics that studies the physical properties of lightoptics - the branch of physics that studies the physical properties of light
meniscus - (optics) a lens that is concave on one side and convex on the other
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
catoptrics - branch of optics dealing with formation of images by mirrors
holography - the branch of optics that deals with the use of coherent light from a laser in order to make a hologram that can then be used to create a three-dimensional image
stigmatism - (optics) condition of an optical system (as a lens) in which light rays from a single point converge in a single focal point
astigmatism, astigmia - (optics) defect in an optical system in which light rays from a single point fail to converge in a single focal point
collimate - adjust the line of sight of (an optical instrument)
refract - subject to refraction; "refract a light beam"
reflect - show an image of; "her sunglasses reflected his image"
resolve - make clearly visible; "can this image be resolved?"
aberrate - diverge or deviate from the straight path; produce aberration; "The surfaces of the concave lens may be proportioned so as to aberrate exactly equal to the convex lens"
2.optics - optical properties; "the optics of a telescope"
property - a basic or essential attribute shared by all members of a class; "a study of the physical properties of atomic particles"
Translations
بصرباتعِلْم البَصَرِّات
optika
optik
optiikka
optika
optikafénytan
ljósfræðiljósfræîisjónfræði
光学
광학
optyka
optika
optika
ทรรศนศาสตร์
ışık bilimioptik

optics

[ˈɒptɪks] NSINGóptica f

optics

[ˈɒptɪks] noptique f

optics

n singOptik f

optics

[ˈɒptɪks] nsgottica

optical scanner

noun
optics (ˈoptiks) noun singular
the science of light.

op·tics

n. óptica, ciencia que estudia la luz y la relación de ésta con la visión.

optics

n óptica
References in classic literature ?
She screwed her dim optics to their acutest point, in the hope of making out, with greater distinctness, a certain window, where she half saw, half guessed, that a tailor's seamstress was sitting at her work.
Yet those same bleared optics had a strange, penetrating power, when it was their owner's purpose to read the human soul.
I know of governors of places, and seneschals of castles, and sheriffs of counties, and many like small offices and titles of honor, but him you call the Science of Optics I have not heard of before; peradventure it is a new dignity.
Now came a pause of ten minutes, during which I, by this time in perfect possession of my wits, observed all the female Brocklehursts produce their pocket-handkerchiefs and apply them to their optics, while the elderly lady swayed herself to and fro, and the two younger ones whispered, "How shocking
They would sometimes alight upon my victuals, and leave their loathsome excrement, or spawn behind, which to me was very visible, though not to the natives of that country, whose large optics were not so acute as mine, in viewing smaller objects.
At the time I will confess that I thought chiefly of the PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS and my own seventeen papers upon physical optics.
To you, likewise, these optics are indispensable - yet I will convince you that my vision is more penetrating than your own.
With all his sagacity, Rabourdin was better versed in matters of administration than in parliamentary optics, and he was far indeed from imagining how his confidence would be received; he little thought that the great work that filled his mind would seem to the minister nothing more than a theory, and that a man who held the position of a statesman would confound his reform with the schemes of political and self-interested talkers.
Photography has given us proofs of the incomparable beauty of our satellite; all is known regarding the moon which mathematical science, astronomy, geology, and optics can learn about her.
And she raised her face, and gave me such a look of sorrowful tenderness as might have melted my heart, but within those eyes there lurked a something that I did not like; and I wondered how I ever could have admired them - her sister's honest face and small grey optics appeared far more agreeable.
But, on the other hand, they connect diagonally, and the sprawling outlines run off in great slanting waves of optic horror, like a lot of wallowing seaweeds in full chase.
He scarce had ceas't when the superiour Fiend Was moving toward the shore; his ponderous shield Ethereal temper, massy, large and round, Behind him cast; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the Moon, whose Orb Through Optic Glass the TUSCAN Artist views At Ev'ning from the top of FESOLE, Or in VALDARNO, to descry new Lands, Rivers or Mountains in her spotty Globe.