opulence


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op·u·lence

 (ŏp′yə-ləns) also op·u·len·cy (-lən-sē)
n.
1. Wealth; affluence.
2. Great abundance or extravagance.

op•u•lence

(ˈɒp yə ləns)

also op′u•len•cy,



n.
1. wealth, affluence.
2. abundance, as of resources.
3. the state of being opulent.

Opulence

 a wealth or abundance.
Examples: opulence of hair, 1878; of flesh, 1896.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.opulence - wealth as evidenced by sumptuous livingopulence - wealth as evidenced by sumptuous living
wealth, wealthiness - the state of being rich and affluent; having a plentiful supply of material goods and money; "great wealth is not a sign of great intelligence"

opulence

noun
1. luxury, riches, wealth, splendour, prosperity, richness, affluence, voluptuousness, lavishness, sumptuousness, luxuriance the opulence of the hotel's sumptuous interior
2. wealth, means, riches (informal), capital, resources, assets, fortune, substance, prosperity, affluence, easy circumstances, prosperousness He is surrounded by possessions which testify to his opulence.
wealth want, lack, poverty, privation, penury, indigence, impecuniousness
Translations
غِنى، ثَرْوَه، وَفْرَه
luksus
ríkidæmi
servetzenginlik

opulence

[ˈɒpjʊləns] Nopulencia f

opulence

[ˈɒpjʊləns] n [building] → opulence f
(= wealth) → opulence f

opulence

n no plReichtum m; (of person’s appearance also) → Wohlhabenheit f; (of clothes, building, room) → Prunk m, → Stattlichkeit f; (of car, chairs, carpet) → Feudalität f; (of décor, lifestyle, vegetation) → Üppigkeit f; (of figure) → Üppigkeit f, → Fülligkeit f; to live in opulenceim Überfluss leben

opulence

[ˈɒpjʊləns] nopulenza

opulent

(ˈopjulənt) adjective
luxurious; rich. They lived in opulent surroundings.
ˈopulently adverb
ˈopulence noun
References in classic literature ?
I could fancy that, when I was a child, or a youth, that portrait had spoken, and told me a rich secret, or had held forth its hand, with the written record of hidden opulence.
On all sides he beheld vast store of apples: some hanging in oppressive opulence on the trees; some gathered into baskets and barrels for the market; others heaped up in rich piles for the cider-press.
The estate had formerly belonged to a gentleman of opulence and taste, who had bestowed some considerable attention to the adornment of his grounds.
There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentlemen, lolling at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic opulence.
Situation, soil, climate, the nature of the productions, the nature of the government, the genius of the citizens, the degree of information they possess, the state of commerce, of arts, of industry, these circumstances and many more, too complex, minute, or adventitious to admit of a particular specification, occasion differences hardly conceivable in the relative opulence and riches of different countries.
From the time of his settling in Alencon he had nobly admitted his poverty, saying that his whole fortune consisted in an annuity of six hundred francs a year, the sole remains of his former opulence,--a property which obliged him to see his man of business (who held the annuity papers) quarterly.
The world will think you abandoned and poor, for the wife of a bankrupt would never be forgiven, were she to keep up an appearance of opulence.
Wyeth would fain have slipped by this cavalcade unnoticed; but the river, at this place, was not more than ninety yards across; he was perceived, therefore, and hailed by the vagabond warriors, and, we presume, in no very choice language; for, among their other accomplishments, the Crows are famed for possessing a Billingsgate vocabulary of unrivalled opulence, and for being by no means sparing of it whenever an occasion offers.
His children were indulged in luxuries that his death was to dissipate, and enjoyed an opulence that was only co-existent with the life of their parent.
But to no fine gentleman born to hereditary opulence, does this manual labour come more unkindly than to the luxurious Indian when thus robbed of the bounty of heaven.
Provincial debauches, petits-maitres of six hundred livres a year, shared the fragments of his opulence.
The quarter has an air of modern opulence and convenience which seems at variance with the ascetic institution, and the impression made upon Newman's gloomily-irritated gaze by the fresh-looking, windowless expanse behind which the woman he loved was perhaps even then pledging herself to pass the rest of her days was less exasperating than he had feared.