oralism


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o·ral·ism

 (ôr′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The theory or practice of teaching hearing-impaired or deaf persons to communicate by means of spoken language.

o′ral·ist adj. & n.

oralism

(ˈɔːrəlˌɪzəm)
n
the method of communicating with people who are deaf via lip reading or speech

oralism

1. the principles of the oral method of training the deaf, as lip reading.
2. the support or practice of these principles. Cf. manualism. — oralist, n.
See also: Deafness
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References in periodicals archive ?
The issue of pain and discomfort involved with the activation of cochlear implants as well as overarching issues of speech training and oralism are fodder for the ongoing debate between the Deaf community and cochlear implant advocates.
22) Buildings were large, opulent monuments to modern educational science and state legitimacy, and remained so throughout the post-Civil War period, a period characterized by the growth of oralism, or the outlawing of sign language in many American schools.
Besides supporting eugenics, Bell also endorsed oralism to integrate students into general education and prevent people who were deaf from intermingling.
Putting this statement into action in this chapter, Esmail investigates the cultural reception to deaf marriage and reproduction, identifying the eugenicist turn that oralism took from the 1870s onwards.
Electric rhetoric: Classical rhetoric, oralism, and a new literacy, Cambridge.
This absence reflects educational practices at the time Bowen was writing: from the late nineteenth century through the 1970s, the oralist movement dominated educational theory and practice for deaf children; oralism advocated banning signed languages from deaf schools and replacing them with training in lip-reading and speech (Baynton 4-5).
He was in favor of oralism in the education of deaf students and against sign language--as an advocate for integration, he believed societal acceptance of deaf people would be fostered by oralism.
15) Deaf Britons and North Americans shared strategies at Deaf conferences, reported each other's news in their periodicals, and expressed solidarity with the fights against Oralism that the other was waging.
In the battle over that language, between supporters of oralism and sign language, each side drew on the pioneering work done by the Abbe Charles-Michel de l'Epee in the late eighteenth century.
This part is at odds with, if not the oralism of his day, then most certainly with the oralism of our contemporary time, which itself dates back to a decision to whole-heartedly embrace oralism and eschew manualism at a notorious 1880 conference of deaf educators in Milan.
My personal journey within the Deaf worn was continuing and then on a professional level I experienced an insight into how oralism affected the Deaf community.