orality


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orality

(ɔːˈrælɪtɪ)
n
1. the quality of being oral
2. (Linguistics) a tendency to favour the spoken rather than the written form of language
References in periodicals archive ?
Samuel Chiang and Grant Lovejoy have assembled fifteen papers, along with some of the more insightful responses from a 2012 consultation on orality held at the Billy Graham Center, Wheaton, Illinois.
In Orality and Literacy, Walter Ong outlines key characteristics of both oral and literate cultures.
Wandtke also explores the struggle to come to terms with comics' orality when they're also a print-medium and how the outcome of early experiments with literacy in comics led to self-conscious revisionism, which he calls new traditionalism.
Orality in texts is identified as posing a crucial problem for a number of social sciences, especially medieval studies, and particularly in relation to the rediscovery by historians of oral cultures.
Rio takes a different approach, bringing modern concerns with scribal activity, orality, and literacy to the fore with promising results.
The book presents orality as a cultural mode, illustrating the premium given to it by Africans, and suggests that factors such as creativity in performance, the physical presence of fieldworkers in the audience, and the time and place of the presentation all provide ready access to the meaning of this mode.
This is a collection of ten essays written in honor of Werner Kelber for his groundbreaking work over several decades in the area of gospel narrative, orality and literacy, and memory.
Moreover, the book does not really have much to say about literary texts; it deals in the first five of its eight chapters with theories regarding periodization and canonization, the origins of human consciousness, and transitions from orality to literacy.
PERFORMING THE GOSPEL: ORALITY, MEMORY, AND MARK: ESSAYS DEDICATED TO WERNER KELBER.
He has also noted the strong representation of orality in her work as well as of allusions to persons, songs, and places specific to Cuba.
Ong set the parameters of these concepts in his landmark book, Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word (London, 1982).
If lively, and often original, this study, like so many devoted to orality and its echoes, occasionally verges upon the obvious or pretentious.