orator


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Related to orator: oratory

or·a·tor

 (ôr′ə-tər, ŏr′-)
n.
1. One who delivers an oration.
2. An eloquent and skilled public speaker.

or′a·tor·ship′ n.

orator

(ˈɒrətə)
n
1. a public speaker, esp one versed in rhetoric
2. a person given to lengthy or pompous speeches
3. (Law) obsolete the claimant in a cause of action in chancery

or•a•tor

(ˈɔr ə tər, ˈɒr-)

n.
a person who delivers an oration; a public speaker, esp. one of great eloquence.
[1325–75; Middle English oratour < Latin ōrātor speaker, suppliant, derivative of ōrāre; see oration]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.orator - a person who delivers a speech or orationorator - a person who delivers a speech or oration
eulogist, panegyrist - an orator who delivers eulogies or panegyrics
elocutionist - a public speaker trained in voice production and gesture and delivery
haranguer - a public speaker who delivers a loud or forceful or angry speech
speaker, talker, verbaliser, verbalizer, utterer - someone who expresses in language; someone who talks (especially someone who delivers a public speech or someone especially garrulous); "the speaker at commencement"; "an utterer of useful maxims"
spellbinder - an orator who can hold his listeners spellbound
tub-thumper - a noisy and vigorous or ranting public speaker

orator

noun public speaker, speaker, lecturer, spokesperson, declaimer, rhetorician, Cicero, spieler (informal), word-spinner, spokesman or spokeswoman Lenin was the greatest orator of the Russian revolution.

orator

noun
A public speaker:
Translations
خَطيب، رَجُل فَصيح
řečník
taler
orator
szónok
ræîumaîur
orator
rečník

orator

[ˈɒrətəʳ] Norador(a) m/f

orator

[ˈɒrətər] norateur/trice m/f

orator

nRedner(in) m(f), → Orator m (rare, Hist)

orator

[ˈɒrətəʳ] noratore/trice

oration

(əˈreiʃən) noun
a formal, public speech, especially in fine, beautiful language. a funeral oration.
orator (ˈorətə) noun
a person who makes public speeches, especially very eloquent ones.
ˈoratory (ˈorə-) noun
the art of speaking well in public.
oraˈtorical adjective
References in classic literature ?
However much his influence among his people had been impaired by his occasional and besetting weakness, as well as by his desertion of the tribe, his courage and his fame as an orator were undeniable.
So Jurgis found himself in a large hall, elaborately decorated with flags and bunting; and after the chairman had made his little speech, and the orator of the evening rose up, amid an uproar from the band--only fancy the emotions of Jurgis upon making the discovery that the personage was none other than the famous and eloquent Senator Spareshanks, who had addressed the "Doyle Republican Association" at the stockyards, and helped to elect Mike Scully's tenpin setter to the Chicago Board of Aldermen!
And by hideous con- trast, a redundant orator was making a speech to another gathering not thirty steps away, in fulsome laudation of "our glorious British liberties
He was such an impres- sive orator that numerous persons doubted if he had ever been a slave, so he wrote NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS.
said she, when dinner was over and they had drawn round the fire; "are you still to be a great orator in spite of yourself?
God had an errand for me; to bear which afar, to deliver it well, skill and strength, courage and eloquence, the best qualifications of soldier, statesman, and orator, were all needed: for these all centre in the good missionary.
When Mary found this garden it looked quite dead," the orator proceeded.
I prompted our medical orator with a neat speech from behind the curtain; and I never heard such applause, from such a comparatively small audience, before in my life.
In one narrow, dark, and dirty street through which they passed, an excited orator, mounted on a stool, was addressing an excited audience on the cranes against the people, of the king and the royal family.
As when of old som Orator renound In ATHENS or free ROME, where Eloquence Flourishd, since mute, to som great cause addrest, Stood in himself collected, while each part, Motion, each act won audience ere the tongue, Somtimes in highth began, as no delay Of Preface brooking through his Zeal of Right.
He acted every part of an orator, and I could observe many periods of threatenings, and others of promises, pity, and kindness.
It was as different from the telegraph as the eloquence of a great orator is from the sign-language of a deaf-mute.