oratorio


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or·a·to·ri·o

 (ôr′ə-tôr′ē-ō′, ŏr′-)
n. pl. or·a·to·ri·os
A musical composition for voices and orchestra, telling a usually sacred story without costumes, scenery, or dramatic action.

[Italian, after Oratorio, the Oratory of Saint Philip Neri at Rome, where famous musical services were held in the 16th century.]

oratorio

(ˌɒrəˈtɔːrɪəʊ)
n, pl -rios
(Classical Music) a dramatic but unstaged musical composition for soloists, chorus, and orchestra, based on a religious theme
[C18: from Italian, literally: oratory2, referring to the Church of the Oratory at Rome where musical services were held]

or•a•to•ri•o

(ˌɔr əˈtɔr iˌoʊ, -ˈtoʊr-, ˌɒr-)

n., pl. -ri•os.
an extended musical work usu. based upon a religious theme, for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra, and performed without action, costume, or scenery.
[1625–35; < Italian: small chapel < Late Latin ōrātōrium oratory2; so named from the musical services of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri in Rome]

oratorio

A work for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra, usually of a religious or contemplative nature.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oratorio - a musical composition for voices and orchestra based on a religious text
classical, classical music, serious music - traditional genre of music conforming to an established form and appealing to critical interest and developed musical taste
Translations

oratorio

[ˌɒrəˈtɔːrɪəʊ] N (oratorios (pl)) (Mus) → oratorio m

oratorio

[ˌɒrəˈtɔːriəʊ] noratorio m

oratorio

n (Mus) → Oratorium nt

oratorio

[ˌɒrəˈtɔːrɪəʊ] n (Mus) → oratorio
References in classic literature ?
The genius of nature was paramount at the oratorio.
Caleb was very fond of music, and when he could afford it went to hear an oratorio that came within his reach, returning from it with a profound reverence for this mighty structure of tones, which made him sit meditatively, looking on the floor and throwing much unutterable language into his outstretched hands.
Some of you, too, have been to "Pageants," and some may even have been to an oratorio, which last may have been sung in a church.
And it is from these very early monkish plays that the theater with its different kinds of plays, that pageants and even oratorios have sprung.
The oratorio has already lost its relation to the morning, to the sun, and the earth, but that persuading voice is in tune with these.
Men are not well pleased with the figure they make in their own imaginations, and they flee to art, and convey their better sense in an oratorio, a statue, or a picture.
They took her to the ancient concerts by way of a treat, and to the oratorio, and to St.
What was Moses in Egypt but a sublime oratorio, which was acted on the stage instead of being coldly sung in a concert-room?
It was no longer beans that I hoed, nor I that hoed beans; and I remembered with as much pity as pride, if I remembered at all, my acquaintances who had gone to the city to attend the oratorios.
She had considerably improved her mind by study; she had not only read all the modern plays, operas, oratorios, poems, and romances--in all which she was a critic; but had gone through Rapin's History of England, Eachard's Roman History, and many French
By now everyone knows that Handel composed the oratorio in a 24-day frenzy of artistic inspiration and feverish writing.
HUDDERSFIELD Choral Society has an all-star cast for its forthcoming performance of Felix Mendelssohn's oratorio St Paul on Friday, October 31.