oratory


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or·a·to·ry 1

 (ôr′ə-tôr′ē, ŏr′-)
n.
1. The art of public speaking.
2. Eloquence or skill in making speeches to the public.
3. Public speaking marked by the use of overblown rhetoric.

[Latin (ars) ōrātōria, (art) of speaking, feminine of ōrātōrius, oratorical, from ōrātor, speaker, from ōrātus, past participle of ōrāre, to speak.]

or·a·to·ry 2

 (ôr′ə-tôr′ē, ŏr′-)
n. pl. or·a·to·ries
1. A place for prayer, such as a small private chapel.
2. also Oratory
a. A Roman Catholic religious society founded in 1575 by Saint Philip Neri and consisting of secular priests.
b. A branch or church of this society.

[Middle English oratorie, from Old French, from Late Latin ōrātōrium, place of prayer, from Latin, neuter of ōrātōrius, for praying, from ōrāre, to pray.]

oratory

(ˈɒrətərɪ; -trɪ)
n
1. the art of public speaking
2. rhetorical skill or style
[C16: from Latin (ars) ōrātōria (the art of) public speaking]
ˌoraˈtorical adj
ˌoraˈtorically adv

oratory

(ˈɒrətərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -ries
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a small room or secluded place, set apart for private prayer
[C14: from Anglo-Norman, from Church Latin ōrātōrium place of prayer, from ōrāre to plead, pray]

Oratory

(ˈɒrətərɪ; -trɪ)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Also called: Congregation of the Oratory the religious society of secular priests (Oratorians) living in a community founded by St Philip Neri
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) any church belonging to this society: the Brompton Oratory.

or•a•to•ry1

(ˈɔr əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i, ˈɒr-)

n.
1. skill or eloquence in public speaking.
2. the art of public speaking, esp. in an eloquent manner.
[1580–90; < Latin ōrātōria, n. use of feminine of ōrātōrius of an orator. See orator, -tory1]

or•a•to•ry2

(ˈɔr əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i, ˈɒr-)

n., pl. -ries.
1. a place of prayer, as a small chapel.
2. (cap.) any of the Roman Catholic religious societies of secular priests who live in religious communities but do not take vows.
[1300–50; Middle English < Late Latin ōrātōrium place of prayer. See orator, -tory2]

oratory

A small private chapel.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oratory - addressing an audience formally (usually a long and rhetorical address and often pompous); "he loved the sound of his own oratory"
speech, address - the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience; "he listened to an address on minor Roman poets"
keynote address, keynote speech - a speech setting forth the keynote
nominating address, nominating speech, nomination - an address (usually at a political convention) proposing the name of a candidate to run for election; "the nomination was brief and to the point"
oration - an instance of oratory; "he delivered an oration on the decline of family values"
declamation - vehement oratory
epideictic oratory - a type of oratory used to eulogize or condemn a person or group of people; "Pericles' funeral oration for Athenians killed in the Peloponnesian War is a famous example of epideictic oratory"
stump speech - political oratory
salutatory, salutatory address, salutatory oration - an opening or welcoming statement (especially one delivered at graduation exercises)
valediction, valedictory, valedictory address, valedictory oration - a farewell oration (especially one delivered during graduation exercises by an outstanding member of a graduating class)

oratory

noun rhetoric, eloquence, public speaking, speech-making, expressiveness, fluency, a way with words, declamation, speechifying, grandiloquence, spieling (informal) Neither candidate is noted for oratory or political skill.

oratory

noun
The art of public speaking:
Translations
فَن الخِطابَه، بَلاغَه، فَصاحَه
talekunst
szónoklásszónoklat
mælskulist
oratoria
rečnícke umenie
besedništvo
güzel konuşma sanatıhitabet

oratory

1 [ˈɒrətərɪ] N (= art of speaking) → oratoria f

oratory

2 [ˈɒrətərɪ] N (Rel) → oratorio m

oratory

[ˈɒrətəri] n
(= art) → talent m oratoire
He displayed determination as well as powerful oratory → Il faisait preuve de détermination ainsi que d'un remarquable talent oratoire.
(= speech) → oraison f

oratory

1
n (= art of making speeches)Redekunst f

oratory

2
n (Eccl) → Oratorium nt

oratory

1 [ˈɒrətrɪ] n (public speaking) → oratoria

oratory

2 [ˈɒrətrɪ] n (Rel) → oratorio

oration

(əˈreiʃən) noun
a formal, public speech, especially in fine, beautiful language. a funeral oration.
orator (ˈorətə) noun
a person who makes public speeches, especially very eloquent ones.
ˈoratory (ˈorə-) noun
the art of speaking well in public.
oraˈtorical adjective
References in classic literature ?
In the third place, the term 'prior' is used with reference to any order, as in the case of science and of oratory.
In former times, when the same person was both demagogue and general, the democracies were changed into tyrannies; and indeed most of the ancient tyrannies arose from those states: a reason for which then subsisted, but not now; for at that time the demagogues were of the soldiery; for they were not then powerful by their eloquence; but, now the art of oratory is cultivated, the able speakers are at present the demagogues; but, as they are unqualified to act in a military capacity, they cannot impose themselves on the people as tyrants, if we except in one or two trifling instances.
In the case of oratory, this is the function of the Political art and of the art of rhetoric: and so indeed the older poets make their characters speak the language of civic life; the poets of our time, the language of the rhetoricians.
From a long and miserable experience of suffering, injustice, disgrace and aggression the nations of the earth are mostly swayed by fear - fear of the sort that a little cheap oratory turns easily to rage, hate, and violence.
The imagery of the Indian, both in his poetry and in his oratory, is oriental; chastened, and perhaps improved, by the limited range of his practical knowledge.
In the first place, I have a very low idea of the importance of oratory as an intellectual accomplishment.
In the bedroom in which this passage ended, Bernouin encountered Madame de Beauvais, like himself intrusted with the secret of these subterranean love affairs; and Madame de Beauvais undertook to prepare Anne of Austria, who was in her oratory with the young king, Louis XIV.
Then turning back again, but avoiding passing through the breakfast apartment, he crossed several rooms, with the intention of seeking the queen-mother in her oratory, where she usually remained.
On the left side of this chapel is a small oratory, eight by six in the thickness of the wall, with a niche in the wall, and enlightened by a like loop-hole.
The countess went into the oratory and there Sonya found her on her knees before the icons that had been left here and there hanging on the wall.
All oratory (though my clerical brethren are shy of confessing it) is acting--without the scenery and the costumes.
The ingenious Mrs Honour having applied all her oratory to dissuade her mistress from her purpose, when she found her positively determined, at last started the following expedient to remove her clothes, viz.