orchestra


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or·ches·tra

 (ôr′kĭ-strə, -kĕs′trə)
n.
1. Music
a. A large group of musicians who play together on various instruments, usually including strings, woodwinds, brass instruments, and percussion instruments.
b. The instruments played by such a group.
2. The area in a theater or concert hall where the musicians sit, immediately in front of and below the stage.
3.
a. The front section of seats nearest the stage in a theater.
b. The entire main floor of a theater.
4. A semicircular space in front of the stage used by the chorus in ancient Greek theaters.

[Latin orchēstra, the space in front of the stage in Greek theaters where the chorus performed, from Greek orkhēstrā, from orkheisthai, to dance.]

or·ches′tral (ôr-kĕs′trəl) adj.
or·ches′tral·ly adv.

orchestra

(ˈɔːkɪstrə)
n
1. (Classical Music) a large group of musicians, esp one whose members play a variety of different instruments. See also symphony orchestra, string orchestra, chamber orchestra
2. (Classical Music) a group of musicians, each playing the same type of instrument: a balalaika orchestra.
3. (Theatre) Also called: orchestra pit the space reserved for musicians in a theatre, immediately in front of or under the stage
4. (Theatre) chiefly US and Canadian the stalls in a theatre
5. (Theatre) (in the ancient Greek theatre) the semicircular space in front of the stage
[C17: via Latin from Greek: the space in the theatre reserved for the chorus, from orkheisthai to dance]
orchestral adj
orˈchestrally adv

or•ches•tra

(ˈɔr kə strə, -kɛs trə)

n., pl. -tras.
1. a group of performers on various musical instruments, including esp. strings, winds, and percussion, who play music together.
2. (in a modern theater)
a. the space reserved for the musicians, usu. the front part of the main floor (or′chestra pit`).
b. the entire main-floor space for the audience.
c. the front section of seats on the main floor; parquet.
3. (in an ancient Greek theater) the circular space in front of the stage, allotted to the chorus.
4. (in a Roman theater) a similar space reserved for persons of distinction.
[1590–1600; < Latin orchēstra < Greek orchḗstra the space on which the chorus danced, derivative of orcheîsthai to dance]

orchestra

  • wind band - A band of wind instruments or a collective term for the wind instruments of an orchestra.
  • first chair - The premier musician playing a particular instrument in an orchestra—seated closest to the audience, taking the lead for that instrument's movements, and playing any solos.
  • first violin - Leads the orchestra and plays notes in a higher range than second violins; parts for the first violin usually have more of the main tune and are technically more difficult to play.
  • orchestra - The earliest senses of orchestra were "the semicircular area for the chorus to dance in an ancient Greek theatre" and the art of dancing itself (from Greek orkheisthai, "to dance").

Orchestra

 a group of performers on various instruments, 1720; the collective sound which is reminiscent of an orchestra playing, as the sound of the sea or the wind.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.orchestra - a musical organization consisting of a group of instrumentalists including string playersorchestra - a musical organization consisting of a group of instrumentalists including string players
section - a division of an orchestra containing all instruments of the same class
musical group, musical organisation, musical organization - an organization of musicians who perform together
chamber orchestra - small orchestra; usually plays classical music
string orchestra - an orchestra playing only stringed instruments
philharmonic, symphony orchestra, symphony - a large orchestra; can perform symphonies; "we heard the Vienna symphony"
2.orchestra - seating on the main floor in a theater
seating, seating area, seating room, seats - an area that includes places where several people can sit; "there is seating for 40 students in this classroom"
theater, theatre, house - a building where theatrical performances or motion-picture shows can be presented; "the house was full"

orchestra

Instruments in a full orchestra

violin, viola, double bass, piano, harp, piccolo, flute, oboe, cor anglais, contra-bassoon, bassoon, clarinet, french horn, trumpet, tuba, trombone, timpani, gong, bass-drum, xylophone, celesta, snare drum, tubular bells
Translations
أورْكِسْتْرا: فِرْقَه موسيقِيَّهالأُورْكِسْتْرَا
orchestr
orkesterorkestergravorchestra
orkesteriorkesterimonttuorkestra
orkestar
zenekar
hljómsveit
オーケストラ
관현악단
orkestrasorkestrinisorkestro
orķestris
orchestraorkiestra
orchester
orkester
orkester
วงดนตรีขนาดใหญ่ที่เล่นเพลงคลาสสิค
dàn nhạc giao hưởng

orchestra

[ˈɔːkɪstrə]
A. Norquesta f
symphony orchestraorquesta f sinfónica
string orchestraorquesta f de cuerdas
chamber orchestraorquesta f de cámara
B. CPD orchestra pit Nfoso m de orquesta
orchestra stalls NPL (Theat) → luneta fsing, platea fsing

orchestra

[ˈɔːrkɪstrə] n
(= organization) → orchestre m
I play in the school orchestra → Je joue dans l'orchestre de l'école.
(US) (= seating) → fauteuils mpl d'orchestre, orchestre m

orchestra

nOrchester nt

orchestra

:
orchestra pit
orchestra stalls
plOrchestersitze pl; a seat in the orchestraein Orchestersitz m

orchestra

[ˈɔːkɪstrə] norchestra (Am) (seating) → platea

orchestra

(ˈoːkəstrə) noun
a (usually large) group of musicians playing together, led by a conductor.
orˈchestral (-ˈkes-) adjective
for, or given by, an orchestra. orchestral music; an orchestral concert.

orchestra

الأُورْكِسْتْرَا orchestr orkester Orchester ορχήστρα orquesta orkesteri orchestre orkestar orchestra オーケストラ 관현악단 orkest orkester orkiestra orquestra оркестр orkester วงดนตรีขนาดใหญ่ที่เล่นเพลงคลาสสิค orkestra dàn nhạc giao hưởng 管弦乐队
References in classic literature ?
The leader of the orchestra, an irascible elderly monkey, sat on a revolving stool to which he was securely attached.
An orchestra of yellow silk women and bald-headed men on an elevated stage near the centre of a great green-hued hall, played a popular waltz.
First the man in the tight trousers sang alone, then she sang, then they both paused while the orchestra played and the man fingered the hand of the girl in white, obviously awaiting the beat to start singing with her.
Turning toward the audience, he pointed to the rear of the orchestra, yelling wildly at the same time:
When all members of ethe company were in their places an orchestra of five hundred pieces, in a balcony overlooking the banquet room, began to play sweet and delightful music.
That was splendid too; that is, the orchestra was, though I'd have enjoyed it more if those jumping-jacks had kept quiet or gone off the stage.
The main performance was under way, the orchestra was playing and the audience intermittently applauding.
Its discordant clashes sweep upward in one harmonious tone that blends with the music of other worlds--to complete God's orchestra.
An angel throng, bewinged, bedight In veils, and drowned in tears, Sit in a theatre, to see A play of hopes and fears, While the orchestra breathes fitfully The music of the spheres.
While the charmingly sincere young man pleaded with her-- accompanied by the orchestra in the old `Traviata' duet,
At those times, as the howlings and wailings and shrieking of the singers, and the ragings and roarings and explosions of the vast orchestra rose higher and higher, and wilder and wilder, and fiercer and fiercer, I could have cried if I had been alone.
At ten minutes to eight Beauchamp arrived; he had seen Chateau-Renaud, who had promised to be in the orchestra before the curtain was raised.