order


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or·der

 (ôr′dər)
n.
1. A condition of logical or comprehensible arrangement among the separate elements of a group.
2.
a. A condition of methodical or prescribed arrangement among component parts such that proper functioning or appearance is achieved: checked to see that the shipping department was in order.
b. Condition or state in general: The escalator is in good working order.
3.
a. The established system of social organization: "Every revolution exaggerates the evils of the old order" (C. Wright Mills).
b. A condition in which freedom from disorder or disruption is maintained through respect for established authority: finally restored order in the rebellious provinces.
4. A sequence or arrangement of successive things: changed the order of the files.
5. The prescribed form or customary procedure, as in a meeting or court of law: The bailiff called the court to order.
6. An authoritative indication to be obeyed; a command or direction.
7.
a. A command given by a superior military officer requiring obedience, as in the execution of a task.
b. orders Formal written instructions to report for military duty at a specified time and place.
8.
a. A commission or instruction to buy, sell, or supply something.
b. That which is supplied, bought, or sold.
9.
a. A request made by a customer at a restaurant for a portion of food.
b. The food requested.
10. Law A directive or command of a court.
11. Ecclesiastical
a. Any of several grades of the Christian ministry: the order of priesthood.
b. often orders The rank of an ordained Christian minister or priest.
c. often orders The sacrament or rite of ordination.
12. Any of the nine grades or choirs of angels.
13. A group of persons living under a religious rule: Order of Saint Benedict.
14. An organization of people united by a common fraternal bond or social aim.
15.
a. A group of people upon whom a government or sovereign has formally conferred honor for unusual service or merit, entitling them to wear a special insignia: the Order of the Garter.
b. The insignia worn by such people.
16. often orders A social class: the lower orders.
17. A class defined by the common attributes of its members; a kind.
18. Degree of quality or importance; rank: poetry of a high order.
19. Architecture
a. Any of several styles of classical architecture characterized by the type of column and entablature employed. Of the five generally accepted classical orders, the Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian orders are Greek and the Tuscan and Composite orders are Roman.
b. A style of building: a cathedral of the Gothic order.
20. Biology A taxonomic category of organisms ranking above a family and below a class.
21. Mathematics
a. The sum of the exponents to which the variables in a term are raised; degree.
b. An indicated number of successive differentiations to be performed.
c. The number of elements in a finite group.
d. The number of rows or columns in a determinant or matrix.
v. or·dered, or·der·ing, or·ders
v.tr.
1.
a. To issue a command or instruction to: ordered the sailors to stow their gear.
b. To direct to proceed as specified: ordered the intruders off the property.
2.
a. To give a command or instruction for: The judge ordered a recount of the ballots.
b. To request to be supplied with: order eggs and bacon for breakfast.
3. To put into a methodical, systematic arrangement: ordered the books on the shelf. See Synonyms at arrange.
4. To predestine; ordain.
v.intr.
To give an order or orders; request that something be done or supplied.
Idioms:
in order that
So that.
in order to
For the purpose of.
in short order
With no delay; quickly.
on order
Requested but not yet delivered.
on the order of
1. Of a kind or fashion similar to; like: a house on the order of a mountain lodge.
2. Approximately; about: equipment costing on the order of a million dollars.
to order
According to the buyer's specifications.

[Middle English ordre, from Old French, variant of ordene, from Latin ōrdō, ōrdin-; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

or′der·er n.

order

(ˈɔːdə)
n
1. a state in which all components or elements are arranged logically, comprehensibly, or naturally
2. an arrangement or disposition of things in succession; sequence: alphabetical order.
3. an established or customary method or state, esp of society
4. a peaceful or harmonious condition of society: order reigned in the streets.
5. (often plural) a class, rank, or hierarchy: the lower orders.
6. (Biology) biology any of the taxonomic groups into which a class is divided and which contains one or more families. Carnivora, Primates, and Rodentia are three orders of the class Mammalia
7. an instruction that must be obeyed; command
8. (Law) a decision or direction of a court or judge entered on the court record but not included in the final judgment
9. (Commerce)
a. a commission or instruction to produce or supply something in return for payment
b. the commodity produced or supplied
c. (as modifier): order form.
10. a procedure followed by an assembly, meeting, etc
11. (capital when part of a name) a body of people united in a particular aim or purpose
12. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (usually capital) Also called: religious order a group of persons who bind themselves by vows in order to devote themselves to the pursuit of religious aims
13. (Historical Terms) history a society of knights constituted as a fraternity, such as the Knights Templars
14.
a. a group of people holding a specific honour for service or merit, conferred on them by a sovereign or state
b. the insignia of such a group
15. (Architecture)
a. any of the five major classical styles of architecture classified by the style of columns and entablatures used. See also Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, Tuscan, composite4
b. any style of architecture
16. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity
a. the sacrament by which bishops, priests, etc, have their offices conferred upon them
b. any of the degrees into which the ministry is divided
c. the office of an ordained Christian minister
17. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a form of Christian Church service prescribed to be used on specific occasions
18. (Judaism) Judaism one of the six sections of the Mishna or the corresponding tractates of the Talmud
19. (Mathematics) maths
a. the number of times a function must be differentiated to obtain a given derivative
b. the order of the highest derivative in a differential equation
c. the number of rows or columns in a determinant or square matrix
d. the number of members of a finite group
20. (Statistics) short for order of magnitude
21. (Military) the order military the dress, equipment, or formation directed for a particular purpose or undertaking: drill order; battle order.
22. a tall order something difficult, demanding, or exacting
23. in order
a. in sequence
b. properly arranged
c. appropriate or fitting
24. in order to (preposition; foll by an infinitive) so that it is possible to: to eat in order to live.
25. in order that (conjunction) with the purpose that; so that
26. keep order to maintain or enforce order
27. of the order of in the order of having an approximately specified size or quantity
28. (Commerce) on order having been ordered or commissioned but not having been delivered
29. out of order
a. not in sequence
b. not working
c. not following the rules or customary procedure
30. to order
a. according to a buyer's specifications
b. on request or demand
vb
31. (tr) to give a command to (a person or animal to do or be something)
32. (Commerce) to request (something) to be supplied or made, esp in return for payment: he ordered a hamburger.
33. (tr) to instruct or command to move, go, etc (to a specified place): they ordered her into the house.
34. (tr; may take a clause as object) to authorize; prescribe: the doctor ordered a strict diet.
35. (tr) to arrange, regulate, or dispose (articles) in their proper places
36. (of fate or the gods) to will; ordain
37. (tr) rare to ordain
interj
38. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an exclamation of protest against an infringement of established procedure
39. an exclamation demanding that orderly behaviour be restored
[C13: from Old French ordre, from Latin ordō]
ˈorderer n
ˈorderless adj

or•der

(ˈɔr dər)
n.
1. an authoritative direction or instruction; command.
2. the disposition of things following one after another; succession or sequence: alphabetical order.
3. a condition in which each thing is properly disposed with reference to other things and to its purpose; methodical or harmonious arrangement.
4. formal disposition or array.
5. proper, satisfactory, or working condition.
6. state or condition generally: in good working order.
7. conformity or obedience to law or established authority: to maintain law and order.
8. customary mode of procedure; established practice or usage.
9. the customary or prescribed mode of proceeding in debates, legislative bodies, meetings, etc.: parliamentary rules of order.
10. prevailing course or arrangement of things; established system or regime: The old order is changing.
11. a direction or commission to make, provide, or furnish something.
12. a quantity of goods or items purchased or sold.
13. a portion of food requested or served in a restaurant.
14. Math.
a. degree, as in algebra.
b. the number of rows or columns of a square matrix or determinant.
c. the number of times a function has been differentiated to produce a given derivative: a second-order derivative.
d. the highest derivative appearing in a given differential equation.
e. the number of elements of a given group.
15. a class, kind, or sort distinguished from others by character or rank: talents of a high order.
16. Biol. the usual major subdivision of a class or subclass in the classification of organisms, consisting of one or more families.
17. a rank or class of persons in a community.
18. a group or body of persons of the same profession, occupation, or pursuits.
19. a body or society of persons living by common consent under the same religious, moral, or social regulations.
20. any of the degrees or grades of clerical office. Compare major order, minor order.
21. a monastic society or fraternity: the Franciscan order.
22. any of the nine grades of angels in medieval angelology. Compare angel (def. 1).
23. a written direction to pay money or deliver goods, given by a person legally entitled to dispose of it.
24. Archit.
a. an arrangement of columns with an entablature.
b. any of five styles of column and entablature typical of classical architecture, including the Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, Tuscan, and Composite styles.
25. orders, the rank or status of an ordained Christian minister.
26. Usu., orders. the rite or sacrament of ordination.
27. a prescribed form of religious service or of administration of a rite.
28. a society or fraternity of knights, of combined military and monastic character, as the medieval Knights Templars.
29. an organization or fraternal society in some way resembling the knightly orders.
30. (cap.)
a. a special honor or rank conferred by a sovereign upon a person for distinguished achievement.
b. the insignia worn by such persons.
v.t.
31. to give an order or command to.
32. to direct or command to go or come as specified: She ordered them out of her house.
33. to direct to be made or supplied: to order a copy of a book.
34. to prescribe.
35. to regulate, conduct, or manage.
36. to arrange methodically or suitably.
37. Math. to arrange (the elements of a set) so that if one element precedes another, it cannot be preceded by the other or by elements that the other precedes.
38. to ordain.
v.i.
39. to give an order or issue orders.
Idioms:
1. call to order, to begin (a meeting).
2. in order, rightful and proper; appropriate: An apology is certainly in order.
3. in order that, so that; to the end that.
4. in order to, as a means to; with the purpose of.
5. on order, ordered but not yet received.
6. on the order of,
a. resembling to some extent; like.
b. approximately; about.
7. out of order,
a. not in correct sequence or arrangement.
b. not operating properly; in disrepair.
8. to order, according to the purchaser's requirements or stipulations.
[1175–1225; Middle English ordre < Old French < Latin ōrdinem, acc. of ōrdō row, rank]
syn: See direct.

or·der

(ôr′dər)
A group of organisms ranking above a family and below a class. See Table at taxonomy.

order

A communication, written, oral, or by signal, which conveys instructions from a superior to a subordinate. (DOD only) In a broad sense, the terms "order" and "command" are synonymous. However, an order implies discretion as to the details of execution whereas a command does not.

Order/Disorder

 

See Also: CLEANLINESS

  1. The big house ran like a Swiss clock — Rita Mae Brown
  2. (The market is in absolute) chaos … like people running out on the field after a Mets game —Howard Farber, New York Times, October 5, 1986
  3. The chaos described by Farber refers to the x-rated video industry.

    Chaotic as the floor of the stock exchange at the closing bell —William Diehl

  4. (Chaos and) disorder is like a pebble in my shoe or loose hair under my shirt collar —Warren Miller
  5. Disorder piles up like a (local California) mountain —Janet Flanner
  6. Household ordered like a monastic establishment —Gustave Flaubert
  7. Housekeeping, like good manners, is usually inconspicuous —Peg Bracken
  8. Keeps house like a Dutch housekeeper —Anaĩs Nin

    The person whose neatness is likened to that of a Dutch housekeeper is novelist Henry Miller.

  9. (The whole lot was) littered like a schoolroom after a paper fight —Mary Hood
  10. Neat and bare as a Gl’s footlocker —George Garrett

    See Also: EMPTINESS

  11. (Withered little Filipino men, as) neat and brittle as whiskbrooms —Fletcher Knebel
  12. Neat and dustless as a good museum —George Garrett
  13. Neat and soft as a puff of smoke —George Garrett

    See Also: SOFTNESS

  14. Neat as a coffin —Anon
  15. Neat as a cupcake —Laurie Colwin
  16. (The little one-story house was as …) neat as a fresh pinafore —Raymond Chandler
  17. Neat as a hoop —Rosellen Brown
  18. Neat as a morgue —Wilfrid Sheed
  19. Neat as an employee prepared to be given a pink slip and told to clear out his desk within half an hour —Elyse Sommer
  20. Neat as a pin —American colloquialism

    This has its roots in the English expression “Neat as a ninepence,” and serves as continuing inspiration for catchy “Neat as” comparisons.

  21. (House,) neat as a stamp collection —Marge Piercy
  22. (He was) neat as a warm stone —Don Robertson
  23. Neat as pie crust —Julia O’Faolain
  24. (You are) rumpled like a sweater —Marge Piercy

    Another example of a simile used as an introducer, in this case a poem entitled Nothing More Will Happen.

  25. Their rooms were neat as monk’s cells —Babs H. Deal
  26. (He said that) the lawn and house should be neat and pass inspection … like a soldier’s bunk and beard —Mary Morris
  27. Untidy … like a bird of paradise that had been out all night in the rain —Oscar Wilde

order


Past participle: ordered
Gerund: ordering

Imperative
order
order
Present
I order
you order
he/she/it orders
we order
you order
they order
Preterite
I ordered
you ordered
he/she/it ordered
we ordered
you ordered
they ordered
Present Continuous
I am ordering
you are ordering
he/she/it is ordering
we are ordering
you are ordering
they are ordering
Present Perfect
I have ordered
you have ordered
he/she/it has ordered
we have ordered
you have ordered
they have ordered
Past Continuous
I was ordering
you were ordering
he/she/it was ordering
we were ordering
you were ordering
they were ordering
Past Perfect
I had ordered
you had ordered
he/she/it had ordered
we had ordered
you had ordered
they had ordered
Future
I will order
you will order
he/she/it will order
we will order
you will order
they will order
Future Perfect
I will have ordered
you will have ordered
he/she/it will have ordered
we will have ordered
you will have ordered
they will have ordered
Future Continuous
I will be ordering
you will be ordering
he/she/it will be ordering
we will be ordering
you will be ordering
they will be ordering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ordering
you have been ordering
he/she/it has been ordering
we have been ordering
you have been ordering
they have been ordering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ordering
you will have been ordering
he/she/it will have been ordering
we will have been ordering
you will have been ordering
they will have been ordering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ordering
you had been ordering
he/she/it had been ordering
we had been ordering
you had been ordering
they had been ordering
Conditional
I would order
you would order
he/she/it would order
we would order
you would order
they would order
Past Conditional
I would have ordered
you would have ordered
he/she/it would have ordered
we would have ordered
you would have ordered
they would have ordered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.order - (often plural) a command given by a superior (e.g., a military or law enforcement officer) that must be obeyedorder - (often plural) a command given by a superior (e.g., a military or law enforcement officer) that must be obeyed; "the British ships dropped anchor and waited for orders from London"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
bid, bidding, command, dictation - an authoritative direction or instruction to do something
marching orders - an order from a superior officer for troops to depart
summons - an order to appear in person at a given place and time
word - a verbal command for action; "when I give the word, charge!"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
2.order - a degree in a continuum of size or quantity; "it was on the order of a mile"; "an explosion of a low order of magnitude"
magnitude - the property of relative size or extent (whether large or small); "they tried to predict the magnitude of the explosion"; "about the magnitude of a small pea"
3.order - established customary state (especially of society); "order ruled in the streets"; "law and order"
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
civil order, polity - the form of government of a social organization
rule of law - a state of order in which events conform to the law
tranquillity, quiet, tranquility - an untroubled state; free from disturbances
concordance, concord, harmony - a harmonious state of things in general and of their properties (as of colors and sounds); congruity of parts with one another and with the whole
stability - a stable order (especially of society)
peace - the state prevailing during the absence of war
disorder - a disturbance of the peace or of public order
4.order - logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements; "we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation"
bacteria order - an order of bacteria
word order - the order of words in a text
arrangement - an orderly grouping (of things or persons) considered as a unit; the result of arranging; "a flower arrangement"
genetic code - the ordering of nucleotides in DNA molecules that carries the genetic information in living cells
genome - the ordering of genes in a haploid set of chromosomes of a particular organism; the full DNA sequence of an organism; "the human genome contains approximately three billion chemical base pairs"
series - similar things placed in order or happening one after another; "they were investigating a series of bank robberies"
5.order - a condition of regular or proper arrangement; "he put his desk in order"; "the machine is now in working order"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
spit and polish - careful attention to order and appearance (as in the military)
kelter, kilter - in working order; "out of kilter"; "in good kilter"
tidiness - the habit of being tidy
disorderliness, disorder - a condition in which things are not in their expected places; "the files are in complete disorder"
6.order - a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge)order - a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge); "a friend in New Mexico said that the order caused no trouble out there"
act, enactment - a legal document codifying the result of deliberations of a committee or society or legislative body
consent decree - an agreement between two parties that is sanctioned by the court; for example, a company might agree to stop certain questionable practices without admitting guilt
curfew - an order that after a specific time certain activities (as being outside on the streets) are prohibited
decree nisi - a decree issued on a first petition for divorce; becomes absolute at some later date
imperial decree - a decree issued by a sovereign ruler
judicial separation, legal separation - a judicial decree regulating the rights and responsibilities of a married couple living apart
programma - an edict that has been publicly posted
ban, proscription, prohibition - a decree that prohibits something
stay - a judicial order forbidding some action until an event occurs or the order is lifted; "the Supreme Court has the power to stay an injunction pending an appeal to the whole Court"
papal bull, bull - a formal proclamation issued by the pope (usually written in antiquated characters and sealed with a leaden bulla)
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
7.order - a commercial document used to request someone to supply something in return for payment and providing specifications and quantitiesorder - a commercial document used to request someone to supply something in return for payment and providing specifications and quantities; "IBM received an order for a hundred computers"
commercial document, commercial instrument - a document of or relating to commerce
bill-me order, credit order - an order that is received without payment; requires billing at a later date
indent - an order for goods to be exported or imported
market order - an order to a broker to sell or buy stocks or commodities at the prevailing market price
production order - an order that initiates the manufacturing process
reorder - a repeated order for the same merchandise; "he's the one who sends out all the new orders and reorders"
stop order, stop-loss order - an order to a broker to sell (buy) when the price of a security falls (rises) to a designated level
stop payment - a depositor's order to a bank to refuse payment on a check
mail order - a purchase negotiated by mail
8.order - a formal association of people with similar interestsorder - a formal association of people with similar interests; "he joined a golf club"; "they formed a small lunch society"; "men from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today"
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
athenaeum, atheneum - a literary or scientific association for the promotion of learning
bookclub - a club that people join in order to buy selected books at reduced prices
chapter - a local branch of some fraternity or association; "he joined the Atlanta chapter"
chess club - a club of people to play chess
country club - a suburban club for recreation and socializing
frat, fraternity - a social club for male undergraduates
glee club - a club organized to sing together
golf club - a club of people to play golf
hunt club, hunt - an association of huntsmen who hunt for sport
investors club - a club of small investors who buy and sell securities jointly
jockey club - a club to promote and regulate horse racing
racket club - club for players of racket sports
rowing club - a club for rowers
slate club - a group of people who save money in a common fund for a specific purpose (usually distributed at Christmas)
sorority - a social club for female undergraduates
turnverein - a club of tumblers or gymnasts
boat club, yacht club - club that promotes and supports yachting and boating
service club - a club of professional or business people organized for their coordination and active in public services
club member - someone who is a member of a club
9.order - a body of rules followed by an assembly
prescript, rule - prescribed guide for conduct or action
interpellation - (parliament) a parliamentary procedure of demanding that a government official explain some act or policy
standing order - a rule of order permanently in force
cloture, gag law, gag rule, closure - a rule for limiting or ending debate in a deliberative body
point of order - a question as to whether the current proceedings are allowed by parliamentary procedure
previous question - a motion calling for an immediate vote on the main question under discussion by a deliberative assembly
mover, proposer - (parliamentary procedure) someone who makes a formal motion
10.order - (usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchyOrder - (usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy; "theologians still disagree over whether `bishop' should or should not be a separate Order"
acolyte - someone who assists a priest or minister in a liturgical service; a cleric ordained in the highest of the minor orders in the Roman Catholic Church but not in the Anglican Church or the Eastern Orthodox Churches
anagnost - a cleric in the minor orders of the Eastern Orthodox Church who reads the lessons aloud in the liturgy (analogous to the lector in the Roman Catholic Church)
deacon - a cleric ranking just below a priest in Christian churches; one of the Holy Orders
ostiarius, ostiary, doorkeeper - the lowest of the minor Holy Orders in the unreformed Western Church but now suppressed by the Roman Catholic Church
exorcist - one of the minor orders in the unreformed Western Church but now suppressed in the Roman Catholic Church
lector, reader - someone who reads the lessons in a church service; someone ordained in a minor order of the Roman Catholic Church
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
subdeacon - a clergyman an order below deacon; one of the Holy Orders in the unreformed western Christian church and the eastern Catholic Churches but now suppressed in the Roman Catholic Church
status, position - the relative position or standing of things or especially persons in a society; "he had the status of a minor"; "the novel attained the status of a classic"; "atheists do not enjoy a favorable position in American life"
11.order - a group of person living under a religious ruleorder - a group of person living under a religious rule; "the order of Saint Benedict"
Augustinian order - any of several monastic orders observing a rule derived from the writings of St. Augustine
Benedictine order, order of Saint Benedict - a Roman Catholic monastic order founded in the 6th century; noted for liturgical worship and for scholarly activities
Carmelite order, Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel - a Roman Catholic mendicant order founded in the 12th century
Carthusian order - an austere contemplative Roman Catholic order founded by St. Bruno in 1084
Dominican order - a Roman Catholic order of mendicant preachers founded in the 13th century
Franciscan order - a Roman Catholic order founded by Saint Francis of Assisi in the 13th century
Jesuit order, Society of Jesus - a Roman Catholic order founded by Saint Ignatius of Loyola in 1534 to defend Catholicism against the Reformation and to do missionary work among the heathen; it is strongly committed to education and scholarship
religious order, religious sect, sect - a subdivision of a larger religious group
12.order - (biology) taxonomic group containing one or more families
animal order - the order of animals
protoctist order - the order of protoctists
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
taxon, taxonomic category, taxonomic group - animal or plant group having natural relations
class - (biology) a taxonomic group containing one or more orders
suborder - (biology) taxonomic group that is a subdivision of an order
family - (biology) a taxonomic group containing one or more genera; "sharks belong to the fish family"
plant order - the order of plants
fungus order - the order of fungi
13.order - a request for something to be made, supplied, or served; "I gave the waiter my order"; "the company's products were in such demand that they got more orders than their call center could handle"
asking, request - the verbal act of requesting
short order - an order for food that can be prepared quickly
14.order - (architecture) one of original three styles of Greek architecture distinguished by the type of column and entablature used or a style developed from the original three by the Romans
Dorian order, Doric order - the oldest and simplest of the Greek orders and the only one that normally has no base
Ionian order, Ionic order - the second Greek order; the capital is decorated with spiral scrolls
Corinthian order - the last Greek order; similar to the Ionic order except the capital is decorated with carvings of acanthus leaves
Composite order - a Roman order that combines the Corinthian acanthus leaves with the spiral scrolls of the Ionic order
Tuscan order - a Roman order that resembles the Doric order but without a fluted shaft
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
architecture - the discipline dealing with the principles of design and construction and ornamentation of fine buildings; "architecture and eloquence are mixed arts whose end is sometimes beauty and sometimes use"
15.order - the act of putting things in a sequential arrangement; "there were mistakes in the ordering of items on the list"
organisation, organization - the activity or result of distributing or disposing persons or things properly or methodically; "his organization of the work force was very efficient"
rank order - an arrangement according to rank
grading, scaling - the act of arranging in a graduated series
succession, sequence - the action of following in order; "he played the trumps in sequence"
layout - the act of laying out (as by making plans for something)
alphabetisation, alphabetization - the act of putting in alphabetical order
Verb1.order - give instructions to or direct somebody to do something with authority; "I said to him to go home"; "She ordered him to do the shopping"; "The mother told the child to get dressed"
direct - command with authority; "He directed the children to do their homework"
instruct - give instructions or directions for some task; "She instructed the students to work on their pronunciation"
command, require - make someone do something
request - ask (a person) to do something; "She asked him to be here at noon"; "I requested that she type the entire manuscript"
send for, call - order, request, or command to come; "She was called into the director's office"; "Call the police!"
warn - ask to go away; "The old man warned the children off his property"
2.order - make a request for something; "Order me some flowers"; "order a work stoppage"
reorder - make a new request to be supplied with; "The store had to reorder the popular CD several times"
place - to arrange for; "place a phone call"; "place a bet"
call for, request, bespeak, quest - express the need or desire for; ask for; "She requested an extra bed in her room"; "She called for room service"
call - order or request or give a command for; "The unions called a general strike for Sunday"
wish - order politely; express a wish for
commission - place an order for
3.order - issue commands or orders for
inflict, impose, bring down, visit - impose something unpleasant; "The principal visited his rage on the students"
mandate - make mandatory; "the new director of the school board mandated regular tests"
4.order - bring into conformity with rules or principles or usage; impose regulations; "We cannot regulate the way people dress"; "This town likes to regulate"
standardize, standardise - cause to conform to standard or norm; "The weights and measures were standardized"
decide, make up one's mind, determine - reach, make, or come to a decision about something; "We finally decided after lengthy deliberations"
district, zone - regulate housing in; of certain areas of towns
5.order - bring order to or into; "Order these files"
clean up, neaten, square away, tidy, tidy up, straighten, straighten out - put (things or places) in order; "Tidy up your room!"
systematise, systematize, systemise, systemize - arrange according to a system or reduce to a system; "systematize our scientific knowledge"
collate - to assemble in proper sequence; "collate the papers"
unsnarl, disentangle, straighten out - extricate from entanglement; "Can you disentangle the cord?"
arrange, set up - put into a proper or systematic order; "arrange the books on the shelves in chronological order"
disarray, disorder - bring disorder to
6.order - place in a certain order; "order the photos chronologically"
arrange, set up - put into a proper or systematic order; "arrange the books on the shelves in chronological order"
7.order - appoint to a clerical posts; "he was ordained in the Church"
enthrone, vest, invest - provide with power and authority; "They vested the council with special rights"
8.order - arrange thoughts, ideas, temporal events; "arrange my schedule"; "set up one's life"; "I put these memories with those of bygone times"
contemporise, contemporize, synchronise, synchronize - arrange or represent events so that they co-occur; "synchronize biblical events"
phrase - divide, combine, or mark into phrases; "phrase a musical passage"
organize, organise - cause to be structured or ordered or operating according to some principle or idea
9.order - assign a rank or rating to; "how would you rank these students?"; "The restaurant is rated highly in the food guide"
superordinate - place in a superior order or rank; "These two notions are superordinated to a third"
shortlist - put someone or something on a short list
seed - distribute (players or teams) so that outstanding teams or players will not meet in the early rounds
reorder - assign a new order to
subordinate - rank or order as less important or consider of less value; "Art is sometimes subordinated to Science in these schools"
prioritise, prioritize - assign a priority to; "we have too many things to do and must prioritize"
sequence - arrange in a sequence
downgrade - rate lower; lower in value or esteem
upgrade - rate higher; raise in value or esteem
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"

order

verb
1. command, instruct, direct, charge, demand, require, bid, compel, enjoin, adjure Williams ordered him to leave.
command forbid, ban, prohibit, debar, exclude
2. decree, rule, demand, establish, prescribe, pronounce, ordain The President has ordered a full investigation.
decree ban, disallow, proscribe, rule out, veto, outlaw, preclude, make illegal, interdict, criminalize
3. request, ask (for), book, demand, seek, call for, reserve, engage, apply for, contract for, solicit, requisition, put in for, send away for I often order goods over the Internet these days.
noun
1. instruction, ruling, demand, direction, command, say-so (informal), dictate, decree, mandate, directive, injunction, behest, stipulation They were arrested and executed on the orders of Stalin.
2. request, booking, demand, commission, application, reservation, requisition The company say they can't supply our order.
4. organization, system, method, plan, pattern, arrangement, harmony, symmetry, regularity, propriety, neatness, tidiness, orderliness The wish to impose order upon confusion is a kind of intellectual instinct.
organization mess, disorder, confusion, chaos, muddle, shambles, disarray, jumble, pandemonium
5. peace, control, law, quiet, calm, discipline, law and order, tranquillity, peacefulness, lawfulness He has the power to use force to maintain public order.
7. class, set, rank, degree, grade, sphere, caste He maintained that the higher orders of society must rule the lower.
8. kind, group, class, family, form, sort, type, variety, cast, species, breed, strain, category, tribe, genre, classification, genus, ilk, subdivision, subclass, taxonomic group the order of insects Coleoptera, better known as beetles
be the order of the day be obligatory Champagne is the order of the day at weddings.
in order
1. tidy, ordered, neat, arranged, trim, orderly, spruce, well-kept, well-ordered, shipshape, spick-and-span, trig (archaic or dialect), in apple-pie order (informal) We tried to keep the room in order.
2. appropriate, right, fitting, seemly, called for, correct, suitable, acceptable, proper, to the point, apt, applicable, pertinent, befitting, well-suited, well-timed, apposite, germane, to the purpose, meet (archaic), O.K. or okay (informal) I think an apology would be in order.
order someone about or around dominate, bully, intimidate, oppress, dictate to, terrorize, put upon, push around (slang), browbeat, ride roughshod over, lord it over, tyrannize, rule with an iron hand My big brother's always ordering me about.
out of order
1. not working, broken, broken-down, ruined, bust (informal), buggered (slang, chiefly Brit.), defective, wonky (Brit. slang), not functioning, out of commission, on the blink (slang), on its last legs, inoperative, kaput (informal), in disrepair, gone haywire (informal), nonfunctional, on the fritz (U.S. slang), gone phut (informal), U.S. (informal) The phone is out of order.
2. improper, wrong, unsuitable, not done, not on (informal), unfitting, vulgar, out of place, unseemly, untoward, unbecoming, impolite, off-colour, out of turn, uncalled-for, not cricket (informal), indelicate, indecorous Don't you think that remark was a bit out of order?
Proverbs
"A place for everything, and everything in its place"
"There's a time and a place for everything"

order

noun
2. Systematic arrangement and design:
3. A state of sound readiness:
4. A way in which things follow each other in space or time:
5. A number of things placed or occurring one after the other:
Informal: streak.
6. An authoritative indication to be obeyed:
7. A group of people united in a relationship and having some interest, activity, or purpose in common:
8. A class that is defined by the common attribute or attributes possessed by all its members:
Informal: persuasion.
9. A division of persons or things by quality, rank, or grade:
10. A subdivision of a larger group:
verb
1. To give orders to:
2. To command or issue commands in an arrogant manner:
3. To put into a deliberate order:
4. To arrange in an orderly manner:
Translations
أَخَوِيَّه ، رَهْبَنَهأمْرأمْرٌأمْر، بَلاغترتيب
rozkazrozkázatuspořádaná množinauspořádatobjednat
ordrebeordrebestillebestillinggruppe
järjestamakäskimakorralduskorrastamatellima
käskylahkomäärätätilatatilaus
naredbanarediti
rendrendelrendelésrendezsorrend
aturanordoperintah
ávísunkoma lagi á, raîalög og reglapantapöntun
命令指図する
명령명령하다
drausmingasgera būklėidantkadnesilaikantis reglamento
kārtakārtībaklasenorādījumsnorīkot
objednávkaplatobný príkazzákazka
redukazukazatinalognaročilo
ordningbefallningbeordrabeställabeställning
คำสั่งสั่ง
حکم
mệnh lệnhra lệnh

order

[ˈɔːdəʳ]
A. N
1. (= sequence) → orden m
in orderen orden, por orden
what order should these documents be in?¿en qué orden deben estar estos documentos?
in alphabetical orderpor or en orden alfabético
"cast in order of appearance" (Theat, Cine) → "por orden de aparición"
in chronological orderpor orden cronológico
in order of meritordenado según el mérito
they are out of orderestán mal ordenados
to get out of orderdesarreglarse
put these in the right orderponga estos por orden
in order of senioritypor orden de antigüedad
word orderorden m de las palabras
they are in the wrong orderestán mal ordenados
2. (= system) → orden m
a new political/social orderun nuevo orden político/social
she has no order in her lifelleva un régimen de vida muy desorganizado
the old order is changingel viejo orden está cambiando
it is in the order of thingses ley de vida
a new world orderun nuevo orden mundial
3. (= good order) → buen estado m, orden m
in order (legally) → en regla; [room] → en orden, ordenado
his papers are in ordertiene los papeles en regla
everything is in ordertodo está en regla
is this passport in order?¿este pasaporte está en regla?
to put a matter in orderarreglar un asunto
to put one's affairs in orderponer sus asuntos en orden
in good orderen buen estado, en buenas condiciones
a machine in working or running orderuna máquina en buen estado
to be out of order [machine] → estar estropeado or (LAm) descompuesto
the line is out of order (Telec) → no hay línea, la línea no funciona
"out of order"no funciona
4. (= peace, control) → orden m
the forces of orderlas fuerzas del orden
to keep ordermantener el orden
she can't keep orderes incapaz de imponer la disciplina, no puede hacerse obedecer
to keep children in ordermantener a los niños en orden
5. (= command) → orden f; [of court etc] → sentencia f, fallo m
orders are orderslas órdenes no se discuten
bankruptcy orderorden f de quiebra
by order ofpor orden de
Order in Council (Brit) (Parl) → Orden f Real
order of the courtsentencia f del tribunal
deportation orderorden f de deportación
till further ordershasta nueva orden
to give ordersdar órdenes
to give sb orders to do sthordenar or mandar a algn hacer algo
he gave the order for it to be doneordenó que se hiciera
to obey orderscumplir órdenes
on the orders ofa las órdenes de
to take orders from sbrecibir órdenes de algn
I don't take orders from anyonea mí no me da órdenes nadie
that's an order!¡es una orden!
under ordersbajo órdenes
we are under orders not to allow ittenemos orden de no permitirlo
to be under the orders ofestar bajo el mando de
to get one's marching ordersser despedido
see also starter A1
6. (= correct procedure) (at meeting, Parliament etc) → orden m
order (order)!¡orden!
to call sb to orderllamar a algn al orden
to call the meeting to orderabrir la sesión
order of the day (Mil) → orden del día (fig) → moda f, estilo m del momento
strikes are the order of the daylas huelgas están a la orden del día
to be in order [action, request] → ser procedente
a beer would be in ordersería indicado tomarse una cerveza
it seems congratulations are in order!¡enhorabuena!
is it in order for me to go to Rome?¿(le) es inconveniente si voy a Roma?
it is not in order to discuss RuritaniaRuritania está fuera de la cuestión
to be out of order (= unacceptable) [remark] → estar fuera de lugar; [person] → comportarse mal
to rule a matter out of orderdecidir que un asunto no se puede discutir
a point of orderuna cuestión de procedimiento
7. (Comm) → pedido m, encargo m
we have it on order for youestá pedido para usted
we will put it on order for youse lo pediremos para usted al fabricante
to place an order for sth with sbencargar or hacer un pedido de algo a algn
repeat orderpedido m de repetición
rush orderpedido m urgente
made to orderhecho a medida
we can't do things to orderno podemos proveer en seguida todo cuanto se nos pide
that's rather a tall ordereso es mucho pedir
8. (in restaurant) the waiter took our orderel camarero tomó nota de lo que íbamos a comer
an order of French friesuna ración de patatas fritas
9. in order to do sthpara or a fin de hacer algo
in order that he may staypara que pueda quedarse
10. [of society etc] → clase f, categoría f (Bio) → orden m
Benedictine OrderOrden f de San Benito
the present crisis is of a different orderla crisis actual es de un orden distinto
talents of the first ordertalentos mpl de primer orden
holy ordersórdenes fpl sagradas
to be in/take (holy) ordersser/ordenarse sacerdote
the lower orderslas clases bajas or (LAm) populares
of the order of 500del orden de los quinientos
something in or of or > on the order of £3,000 (US) → unos 3.000, alrededor de 3.000
order of magnitudemagnitud f
11. (Fin) → libranza f; (postal) → giro m
pay to the order ofpáguese a la orden de
12. (Archit) → orden m
Doric orderorden m dórico
13. in short order (US) → rápidamente
14. (Mil)
in battle orderen orden de batalla
in close orderen filas apretadas
in marching orderen orden de marchar
B. VT
1. (= command) → mandar, ordenar
to order sb to do sthmandar or ordenar a algn hacer algo
to be ordered to pay costsser condenado en costas
he was ordered to be quietle ordenaron que se callara
he ordered that the army should advanceordenó que el ejército avanzara, dio órdenes de que el ejército avanzara
the referee ordered the player off the fieldel árbitro expulsó al jugador del campo
to order sb in/upmandar entrar/subir a algn, hacer entrar/subir a algn
are you ordering me out of my own house?¿me estás echando de mi propia casa?
2. (= put in order) → ordenar, poner en orden
they are ordered by date/sizeestan ordenados por fecha/tamaño
3. (= organize) → organizar, arreglar
to order one's life properlyorganizar bien su vida, vivir de acuerdo a cierto método
4. [+ goods, meal, taxi] → pedir, encargar
to order a suitmandar hacer un traje
we ordered steak and chipspedimos un filete con patatas fritas
C. VI (in restaurant) → pedir
are you ready to order?¿han decidido qué van a pedir?
D. CPD order book N (Comm) → libro m de pedidos, cartera f de pedidos
order department N (Comm) → sección f de pedidos
order form N (Comm) → hoja f de pedido
order number N (Comm) → número m de pedido
order paper N (Brit) (Parl etc) → orden m del día
see also garter
order about order around VT + ADVdar órdenes a, mandonear
she was fed up with being ordered aboutestaba harta de que le dieran órdenes
order back VT + ADVmandar volver

order

[ˈɔːrr]
n
(= arrangement) [items] → ordre m
in order → en ordre
in alphabetical order → dans l'ordre alphabétique
in numerical order → par ordre numérique
in order of size → par ordre de taille
to put sth in order → mettre qch en ordre
to be out of order [pages, items] → être dans le désordre
(= stability) → ordre m
a semblance of order → un semblant d'ordre
to restore order → restaurer l'ordre
to create order in sth → mettre de l'ordre dans qch
I felt marriage would create some order in our lives → Je pensais que le mariage mettrait un peu d'ordre dans nos vies.
(= set-up) → ordre m
a new world order → un nouvel ordre mondial
[monks, nuns] → ordre m
(= command) → ordre m
to give an order → donner un ordre
to carry out an order → mettre un ordre à exécution
to take orders from sb → recevoir des ordres de qn
I'm not taking orders from you or anyone else! → Je n'ai pas d'ordre à recevoir de vous ou de qui que ce soit!
to be under orders to do sth → avoir ordre de faire qch
He was under orders to shoot the prisoner if he tried to escape → Il avait ordre de tirer sur le prisonnier s'il tentait de s'échapper.
to be the order of the day (= de rigueur) → être à l'ordre du jour
Conservatism and caution are the order of the day → Le conservatisme et la prudence sont à l'ordre du jour.
(= request) (to supplier)commande f
to place an order for sth with sb → commander qch auprès de qn, passer commande de qch à qn
to be on order → être en commande
to have sth on order → avoir qch en commande
made to order → fait sur commande
(in restaurant)commande f
The waiter took our order → Le garçon a pris notre commande.
to the order of → à l'ordre de
to be in good order [house, machine, equipment] → en bon état
"out of order" [lift] (= not working) → "hors service"
to be out of order [parking meter, phone, lift, machine] → être hors service
to be out of order [person, behaviour] (= unacceptable) → être inacceptable
to be in order (= acceptable) → être valable
in order to do sth (= so as to) → afin de faire qch
He does it in order to earn money → Il le fait afin de gagner de l'argent.
in order not to do sth → afin de ne pas faire qch
in order for sth to happen → afin que qch se produise
in order for him to do sth, he has to ... → afin de faire qch, il doit ...
In order for him to win, he has to get at least nine votes → Afin de gagner, il doit obtenir au moins neuf voix.
in order that ... (followed by subject different from that of main clause)afin que + subj ...
I am resigning in order that a line can be drawn under recent events → Je démissionne afin que l'on puisse tirer un trait sur les récents événements.; (followed by subject that is the same as that of main clause)afin de
They are learning English in order that they can study a particular subject → Ils apprennent l'anglais afin de pouvoir étudier un sujet en particulier.
(= about) to be of the order of → être de l'ordre de
in the order of → de l'ordre de
to be in order [passport, papers] → être en règle
vt
(= command) → ordonner
to order sb to do sth → ordonner à qn de faire qch
[+ meal, product] → commander
We ordered steak and chips → Nous avons commandé un steak frites.
(= put into order) [+ pages, paragraphs, points] → ordonner
vicommander
Are you ready to order? → Vous avez choisi or fait votre choix?, Vous êtes prêt à commander?
order about
vt sepdonner des ordres à
She was fed up with being ordered about → Elle en avait marre qu'on lui donne des ordres.
order around
vt sepdonner des ordres à
order off
vt sep [+ person] (= tell to leave) to order sb off sth [+ bus, train] → ordonner à qn de sortir de qch
to order a player off the pitch → ordonner à un joueur de quitter le terrain
order out
vt sep [+ person] (= tell to leave) → ordonner (à qn) de quitter (qch)
to order sb out of a country → ordonner à qn de quitter le pays
refugees who have been ordered out of Britain → les réfugiés qui s'étaient vus ordonner de quitter la Grande-Bretagne
to order a child out of a class → ordonner à un enfant de sortir de la classe
The boy was ordered out of the art class → Le garçon s'était vu ordonner de sortir de la classe de dessin.
order up
vt sep (from supplier) [+ thing] → commanderorder book ncarnet m de commandes

order

n
(= sequence)(Reihen)folge f, → (An)ordnung f; word orderWortstellung f, → Wortfolge f; are they in order/in the right order?sind sie geordnet/in der richtigen Reihenfolge?; in order of preference/meritin der bevorzugten/in der ihren Auszeichnungen entsprechenden Reihenfolge; to put something in (the right) orderetw ordnen; to be in the wrong order or out of orderdurcheinander sein; (one item) → nicht am richtigen Platz sein; to get out of orderdurcheinandergeraten; (one item) → an eine falsche Stelle kommen ? cast N d
(= system)Ordnung f; there’s no order in his workseiner Arbeit fehlt die Systematik; he has no sense of orderer hat kein Gefühl für Systematik or Methode; the order of the worlddie Weltordnung; it is in the order of thingses liegt in der Natur der Dinge; a new social/political ordereine neue soziale/politische Ordnung
(= tidy or satisfactory state)Ordnung f; his passport was in ordersein Pass war in Ordnung; to put or set one’s life/affairs in orderOrdnung in sein Leben/seine Angelegenheiten bringen
(= discipline) (in society) → Ordnung f; (in school, team) → Disziplin f, → Ordnung f; to keep orderdie Ordnung wahren, die Disziplin aufrechterhalten; to keep the children in orderdie Kinder unter Kontrolle halten; order in court (Brit) or the courtroom (US)! → Ruhe im Gerichtssaal!; order, order!Ruhe!
(= working condition)Zustand m; to be in good orderin gutem Zustand sein; (= work well)in Ordnung sein; to be out of/in order (car, radio, telephone) → nicht funktionieren/funktionieren; (machine, lift also) → außer/in Betrieb sein; “out of order„außer Betrieb ? working ADJ c
(= command)Befehl m, → Order f (old, hum); by order of the courtlaut gerichtlicher Anweisung; orders are ordersBefehl ist Befehl; “no parking/smoking by orderParken/Rauchen verboten!“; “no parking - by order of the Town Council”Parken verboten - die Stadtverwaltung; by order of the ministerauf Anordnung des Ministers; I don’t take orders from anyoneich lasse mir von niemandem befehlen; to be under orders to do somethingInstruktionen haben, etw zu tun; until further ordersbis auf weiteren Befehl
(in restaurant etc, Comm) → Bestellung f; (= contract to manufacture or supply)Auftrag m; to place an order with somebodyeine Bestellung bei jdm aufgeben or machen/jdm einen Auftrag geben; to put something on orderetw in Bestellung/Auftrag geben; to be on orderbestellt sein; two orders of French fries (esp US) → zwei Portionen Pommes frites; made to orderauf Bestellung (gemacht or hergestellt)
(Fin) cheque (Brit) or check (US) to orderOrderscheck m, → Namensscheck m; pay to the order ofzahlbar an (+acc); pay X or Order(zahlbar) an X oder dessen Order
in order to do somethingum etw zu tun; in order thatdamit
(= correct procedure at meeting, Parl etc) a point of ordereine Verfahrensfrage; to be out of ordergegen die Verfahrensordnung verstoßen; (Jur: evidence) → unzulässig sein; (fig)aus dem Rahmen fallen; to call somebody to orderjdn ermahnen, sich an die Verfahrensordnung zu halten; to call the meeting/delegates to orderdie Versammlung/die Delegierten zur Ordnung rufen; an explanation/a drink would seem to be in ordereine Erklärung/ein Drink wäre angebracht; congratulations are in orderGlückwünsche sind angebracht; is it in order for me to go to Paris?ist es in Ordnung, wenn ich nach Paris fahre?; his demand is quite in orderseine Forderung ist völlig berechtigt; what’s the order of the day?was steht auf dem Programm (also fig)or auf der Tagesordnung?; (Mil) → wie lautet der Tagesbefehl?
(Archit) → Säulenordnung f; (fig: = class, degree) → Art f; intelligence of a high or the first orderhochgradige Intelligenz; the present crisis is of a different orderdie gegenwärtige Krise ist andersgeartet; something in the order of ten per centin der Größenordnung von zehn Prozent; something in the order of one in ten applicantsetwa einer von zehn Bewerbern
(Mil: = formation) → Ordnung f
(social) → Schicht f; the higher/lower ordersdie oberen/unteren Schichten; the order of baronetsder Freiherrnstand
(Eccl: of monks etc) → Orden m; Benedictine orderBenediktinerorden m
orders pl (holy) orders (Eccl) → Weihe(n) f(pl); (of priesthood)Priesterweihe f; to take (holy) ordersdie Weihen empfangen; he is in (holy) orderser gehört dem geistlichen Stand an
(= honour, society of knights)Orden m; Order of Merit (Brit) → Verdienstorden m ? garter
vt
(= command, decree) sthbefehlen, anordnen; (= prescribe: doctor) → verordnen (for sb jdm); to order somebody to do somethingjdn etw tun heißen (geh), → jdm befehlen or (doctor) → verordnen, etw zu tun; (esp Mil) → jdn dazu beordern, etw zu tun; to order somebody’s arrestjds Verhaftung anordnen; he was ordered to be quietman befahl ihm, still zu sein; (in public) → er wurde zur Ruhe gerufen; the army was ordered to retreatdem Heer wurde der Rückzug befohlen; he ordered his gun to be brought (to him)er ließ sich (dat)sein Gewehr bringen; to order somebody out/homejdn heraus-/heimbeordern (form, hum)or -rufen; (= send out etc)jdn hinaus-/heimbeordern (form, hum)or -schicken
(= direct, arrange) one’s affairs, lifeordnen; to order arms (Mil) → das Gewehr abnehmen
(Comm etc) goods, dinner, taxibestellen; (to be manufactured) ship, suit, machinery etcin Auftrag geben (from sb bei jdm)
vibestellen

order

:
order book
n (Comm) → Auftragsbuch nt; the orders are fulldie Auftragsbücher sind voll
order cheque
nOrderscheck m, → Namensscheck m
order form

order

[ˈɔːdəʳ]
1. n
a. (sequence) → ordine m
in alphabetical order → in ordine alfabetico
in order of merit → in ordine di merito
in order of size → in ordine di grandezza
put these in the right order → mettili nell'ordine giusto
to be in the wrong order or out of order → non essere in ordine
she had no order in her life → aveva una vita disordinata
in the order of things → nell'ordine delle cose
b. (also good order) → ordine m
in order (room) → in ordine (documents) → in regola
a machine in working order → un macchinario funzionante
to be out of order (machine, toilets) → essere guasto/a (telephone, lift) → essere fuori servizio
c. (peace, control) → ordine m
to keep order → mantenere l'ordine
to keep children in order → tenere i bambini sotto controllo
d. (command) → ordine m, comando; (of court, for search, arrest) → mandato; (for payment of fine, maintenance) → ingiunzione f
by order of → per ordine di
on the orders of → agli ordini di
to be under orders to do sth → avere l'ordine di fare qc
to give sb orders to do sth → dare a qn l'ordine di fare qc
to take orders from sb → prendere ordini da qn
to obey orders → ubbidire agli ordini
order of the day → ordine del giorno
violence is the order of the day (fig) → la violenza è all'ordine del giorno
e. (correct procedure, at meeting, Parliament) → procedura
order (order)! (in Parliament) → ordine, signori!
order in court! → silenzio!
to call sb to order → richiamare qn all'ordine
a point of order → una questione di procedura
to be out of order → non (essere) regolamentare
is it in order for me to go to Rome? → mi è permesso andare a Roma?
f. (Comm) → ordinazione f, ordinativo
to be on order → essere stato/a ordinato/a
to ask for a repeat order → chiedere che venga rinnovata un'ordinazione
rush order → ordinazione urgente
tall order (fig) (fam) → un'impresa ardua
made to order → fatto/a su ordinazione, fatto/a su misura
to place an order for sth with sb → fare un'ordinazione di qc a qn
to the order of (Banking) → all'ordine di
payment order (social security) → mandato (di pagamento)
g. in order to do sthper fare qc
in order that → perché + sub, affinché + sub
they cancelled their holiday in order to go to the wedding → hanno cancellato la vacanza per andare al matrimonio
in order there should be no misunderstanding → affinché non ci siano equivoci
h. of or in the order of (approximately) → nell'ordine di
his income is of the order of £40,000 per year → il suo reddito annuale è nell'ordine delle 40.000 sterline
i. (of society, also) (Bio) → ordine m
the lower orders (pej) → i ceti inferiori
Benedictine Order → ordine benedettino
holy orders → ordini (sacri)
to be in/take orders (Rel) → aver ricevuto/prendere gli ordini
2. vt
a. (command) → ordinare
to order sb to do sth → ordinare a qn di fare qc
the referee ordered the player off the field → l'arbitro espulse il giocatore dal campo
b. (put in order) → ordinare, fare ordine in, mettere in ordine
c. (meal) → ordinare; (goods) → ordinare, commissionare; (taxi) → chiamare
3. viordinare
order about order around vt + advcomandare, dare ordini a

order

(ˈoːdə) noun
1. a statement (by a person in authority) of what someone must do; a command. He gave me my orders.
2. an instruction to supply something. orders from Germany for special gates.
3. something supplied. Your order is nearly ready.
4. a tidy state. The house is in (good) order.
5. a system or method. I must have order in my life.
6. an arrangement (of people, things etc) in space, time etc. in alphabetical order; in order of importance.
7. a peaceful condition. law and order.
8. a written instruction to pay money. a banker's order.
9. a group, class, rank or position. This is a list of the various orders of plants; the social order.
10. a religious society, especially of monks. the Benedictine order.
verb
1. to tell (someone) to do something (from a position of authority). He ordered me to stand up.
2. to give an instruction to supply. I have ordered some new furniture from the shop; He ordered a steak.
3. to put in order. Should we order these alphabetically?
ˈorderly adjective
well-behaved; quiet. an orderly queue of people.
nounplural ˈorderlies
1. a hospital attendant who does routine jobs.
2. a soldier who carries an officer's orders and messages.
ˈorderliness noun
ˈorder-form noun
a form on which a customer's order is written.
in order
1. correct according to what is regularly done, especially in meetings etc. It is quite in order to end the meeting now.
2. in a good efficient state. Everything is in order for the party.
in order (that)
so that. He checked all his figures again in order that the report might be as accurate as possible.
in order to
for the purpose of. I went home in order to change my clothes.
made to order
made when and how a customer wishes. curtains made to order.
on order
having been ordered but not yet supplied. We don't have any copies of this book at the moment, but it's on order.
order about
to keep on giving orders (to someone). I'm tired of him ordering me about all the time.
out of order
1. not working (properly). The machine is out of order.
2. not correct according to what is regularly done, especially in meetings etc. He was out of order in saying that.
a tall order
a difficult job or task. Asking us to finish this by Friday is a bit of a tall order.

order

أمْرٌ, يَأمُرُ rozkaz, rozkázat beordre, ordre Befehl, befehlen διαταγή, διατάζω orden, ordenar käsky, määrätä commander, ordre naredba, narediti ordinare, ordine 命令, 指図する 명령, 명령하다 bevel, bevelen beordre, ordre rozkaz, rozkazać ordem, ordenar приказ, приказывать beordra, ordning คำสั่ง, สั่ง emir, emir vermek mệnh lệnh, ra lệnh 定单, 定购

or·der

n. orden, reglamento, disposición;
in ___ thatpara que, a fin de que;
in ___ topara;
v. ordenar, disponer, mandar; [arrange] arreglar;
to be in good ___estar en buen estado;
to get out of ___descomponerse.

order

n (sequence) orden m; (command) orden f; (medical) indicación f (form), orden f; birth — orden de nacimiento; standing — orden permanente; vt indicar (form), ordenar; just what the doctor ordered..justo lo que el médico ordenó
References in classic literature ?
Besides Tom and his father, the Swift household was made up of Eradicate Sampson, a colored man-of-all-work, who, with his mule Boomerang, did what he could to keep the grounds around the house in order.
It was a fixed belief with Madame Lebrun that the conduct of the universe and all things pertaining thereto would have been manifestly of a more intelligent and higher order had not Monsieur Lebrun been removed to other spheres during the early years of their married life.
The lengthened sheet of the Champlain stretched from the frontiers of Canada, deep within the borders of the neighboring province of New York, forming a natural passage across half the distance that the French were compelled to master in order to strike their enemies.
That which at first was only rumor, soon became certainty, as orders passed from the quarters of the commander-in-chief to the several corps he had selected for this service, to prepare for their speedy departure.
According to the orders of the preceding night, the heavy sleep of the army was broken by the rolling of the warning drums, whose rattling echoes were heard issuing, on the damp morning air, out of every vista of the woods, just as day began to draw the shaggy outlines of some tall pines of the vicinity, on the opening brightness of a soft and cloudless eastern sky.
His legs and thighs were thin, nearly to emaciation, but of extraordinary length; and his knees would have been considered tremendous, had they not been outdone by the broader foundations on which this false superstructure of blended human orders was so profanely reared.
He collected bills, booked orders, and did other things.
He wore the rings and pins and badges of different fraternal orders to which he belonged.
First Choice, the European launch customer for the 787, placed its first order for six in July 2004.
Cook (the "ALJ"), and orders the issuance of the attached Order of Prohibition.
The first was the requirement to bar code all medications so that in combination with computerized order entry systems they would enable a much more robust safety check.
Using this measure, the receiving employees can compare the quantity on the purchase order with that on the packing slip.