orders


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Related to orders: Classical orders, Religious Orders

or·der

 (ôr′dər)
n.
1. A condition of logical or comprehensible arrangement among the separate elements of a group.
2.
a. A condition of methodical or prescribed arrangement among component parts such that proper functioning or appearance is achieved: checked to see that the shipping department was in order.
b. Condition or state in general: The escalator is in good working order.
3.
a. The established system of social organization: "Every revolution exaggerates the evils of the old order" (C. Wright Mills).
b. A condition in which freedom from disorder or disruption is maintained through respect for established authority: finally restored order in the rebellious provinces.
4. A sequence or arrangement of successive things: changed the order of the files.
5. The prescribed form or customary procedure, as in a meeting or court of law: The bailiff called the court to order.
6. An authoritative indication to be obeyed; a command or direction.
7.
a. A command given by a superior military officer requiring obedience, as in the execution of a task.
b. orders Formal written instructions to report for military duty at a specified time and place.
8.
a. A commission or instruction to buy, sell, or supply something.
b. That which is supplied, bought, or sold.
9.
a. A request made by a customer at a restaurant for a portion of food.
b. The food requested.
10. Law A directive or command of a court.
11. Ecclesiastical
a. Any of several grades of the Christian ministry: the order of priesthood.
b. often orders The rank of an ordained Christian minister or priest.
c. often orders The sacrament or rite of ordination.
12. Any of the nine grades or choirs of angels.
13. A group of persons living under a religious rule: Order of Saint Benedict.
14. An organization of people united by a common fraternal bond or social aim.
15.
a. A group of people upon whom a government or sovereign has formally conferred honor for unusual service or merit, entitling them to wear a special insignia: the Order of the Garter.
b. The insignia worn by such people.
16. often orders A social class: the lower orders.
17. A class defined by the common attributes of its members; a kind.
18. Degree of quality or importance; rank: poetry of a high order.
19. Architecture
a. Any of several styles of classical architecture characterized by the type of column and entablature employed. Of the five generally accepted classical orders, the Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian orders are Greek and the Tuscan and Composite orders are Roman.
b. A style of building: a cathedral of the Gothic order.
20. Biology A taxonomic category of organisms ranking above a family and below a class.
21. Mathematics
a. The sum of the exponents to which the variables in a term are raised; degree.
b. An indicated number of successive differentiations to be performed.
c. The number of elements in a finite group.
d. The number of rows or columns in a determinant or matrix.
v. or·dered, or·der·ing, or·ders
v.tr.
1.
a. To issue a command or instruction to: ordered the sailors to stow their gear.
b. To direct to proceed as specified: ordered the intruders off the property.
2.
a. To give a command or instruction for: The judge ordered a recount of the ballots.
b. To request to be supplied with: order eggs and bacon for breakfast.
3. To put into a methodical, systematic arrangement: ordered the books on the shelf. See Synonyms at arrange.
4. To predestine; ordain.
v.intr.
To give an order or orders; request that something be done or supplied.
Idioms:
in order that
So that.
in order to
For the purpose of.
in short order
With no delay; quickly.
on order
Requested but not yet delivered.
on the order of
1. Of a kind or fashion similar to; like: a house on the order of a mountain lodge.
2. Approximately; about: equipment costing on the order of a million dollars.
to order
According to the buyer's specifications.

[Middle English ordre, from Old French, variant of ordene, from Latin ōrdō, ōrdin-; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

or′der·er n.

orders

(ˈɔːdəz)
pl n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) short for holy orders
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) in holy orders in orders ordained
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) take holy orders take orders to become ordained
4. (Roman Catholic Church) short for major orders, minor orders
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He collected bills, booked orders, and did other things.
He wore the rings and pins and badges of different fraternal orders to which he belonged.
Madame Lebrun was bustling in and out, giving orders in a high key to a yard-boy whenever she got inside the house, and directions in an equally high voice to a dining-room servant whenever she got outside.
That which at first was only rumor, soon became certainty, as orders passed from the quarters of the commander-in-chief to the several corps he had selected for this service, to prepare for their speedy departure.
He gave rapid orders on many different matters, asked to have read to him a cablegram he expected from Petersburg, and one from Vienna.
I knowing it was impossible for them to escape, capitulated with the enemy, and, at a distance in their view, gave notice to my men of their situation, with orders not to resist, but surrender themselves captives.
Nay, please your worship," answered the man, in much perplexity, but with a backwardness that strikingly indicated the hard and severe character of Colonel Pyncheon's domestic rule; "my master's orders were exceeding strict; and, as your worship knows, he permits of no discretion in the obedience of those who owe him service.
I doubt greatly -- or, rather, I do not doubt at all -- whether any public functionary of the United States, either in the civil or military line, has ever had such a patriarchal body of veterans under his orders as myself.
What of it, if some old hunks of a sea-captain orders me to get a broom and sweep down the decks?
Immediately, by Starbuck's orders, lines were secured to it at different points, so that ere long every boat was a buoy; the sunken whale being suspended a few inches beneath them by the cords.
It was not high, nor yet low, but full, and clear, and kind, and when he gave orders it was so steady and decided that every one knew, both horses and men, that he expected to be obeyed.
Besides Tom and his father, the Swift household was made up of Eradicate Sampson, a colored man-of-all-work, who, with his mule Boomerang, did what he could to keep the grounds around the house in order.