ordination


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or·di·na·tion

 (ôr′dn-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act of ordaining or the state of being ordained.
2. Ecclesiastical The ceremony of consecration to the ministry.
3. An arrangement or ordering.

ordination

(ˌɔːdɪˈneɪʃən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms)
a. the act of conferring holy orders
b. the reception of holy orders
2. the condition of being ordained or regulated
3. an arrangement or order

or•di•na•tion

(ˌɔr dnˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or ceremony of ordaining as a priest, minister, etc.
2. the fact or state of being ordained.
3. a decreeing.
4. the act of arranging.
5. the resulting state; disposition; arrangement.
[1350–1400; Middle English ordinacioun < Late Latin ōrdinātiō ordainment, Latin: a putting in order, appointment =ōrdinā(re) to order, arrange (derivative of ōrdō, s. ōrdin-, order) + -tiō -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ordination - the status of being ordained to a sacred officeordination - the status of being ordained to a sacred office
status, position - the relative position or standing of things or especially persons in a society; "he had the status of a minor"; "the novel attained the status of a classic"; "atheists do not enjoy a favorable position in American life"
2.ordination - logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements; "we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation"
bacteria order - an order of bacteria
word order - the order of words in a text
arrangement - an orderly grouping (of things or persons) considered as a unit; the result of arranging; "a flower arrangement"
genetic code - the ordering of nucleotides in DNA molecules that carries the genetic information in living cells
genome - the ordering of genes in a haploid set of chromosomes of a particular organism; the full DNA sequence of an organism; "the human genome contains approximately three billion chemical base pairs"
series - similar things placed in order or happening one after another; "they were investigating a series of bank robberies"
3.ordination - the act of ordaining; the act of conferring (or receiving) holy orders; "the rabbi's family was present for his ordination"
appointment, designation, naming, assignment - the act of putting a person into a non-elective position; "the appointment had to be approved by the whole committee"
laying on of hands - laying hands on a person's head to invoke spiritual blessing in Christian ordination
holy order - the sacrament of ordination
Translations
رَسامَه الكاهِن، سِيامَة الكاهِن
ordinationpræstevielse
vígsla
ordinācija, iesvētīšana par garīdznieku
atama/kutsama töreni

ordination

[ˌɔːdɪˈneɪʃən] N (Rel) → ordenación f

ordination

[ˌɔːrdɪˈneɪʃən] nordination f

ordination

nOrdination f

ordination

[ˌɔːdɪˈneɪʃn] n (Rel) → ordinazione f

ordination

(oːdiˈneiʃən) noun
the act of making (a person) a priest, minister etc, or the ceremony at which this is done.
References in classic literature ?
It is of importance that no time should be lost with him, for he will of course have much to do relative to his ordination.
Really," said Elinor, "I know so little of these kind of forms, that I can hardly even conjecture as to the time, or the preparation necessary; but I suppose two or three months will complete his ordination.
In the examination which precedes ordination, a thesis is always a requisite.
I informed my superiors that I did not feel myself sufficiently prepared for ordination, and at my request the ceremony was postponed for a year.
My mind, however, is now made up on the subject, for having received ordination at Easter, I have been so fortunate as to be distinguished by the patronage of the Right Honourable Lady Catherine de Bourgh, widow of Sir Lewis de Bourgh, whose bounty and beneficence has preferred me to the valuable rectory of this parish, where it shall be my earnest endeavour to demean myself with grateful respect towards her Ladyship, and be ever ready to perform those rites and ceremonies which are instituted by the Church of England.
On the 23rd he was going to a friend near Peterborough, in the same situation as himself, and they were to receive ordination in the course of the Christmas week.
It vexed him the more, because he could have sworn, were such a thing possible, that he recognized the voices of the minister and Deacon Gookin, jogging along quietly, as they were wont to do, when bound to some ordination or ecclesiastical council.
The University as a step to anything but ordination seemed, to this man of fixed ideas, a preface without a volume.
He would feel like a priest who has broken his ordination vows.
His was a better, far better, nervous, mental, and muscular co- ordination.
Public ceremonies, such as ordinations, the installation of magistrates, and all that could give majesty to the forms in which a new government manifested itself to the people, were, as a matter of policy, marked by a stately and well-conducted ceremonial, and a sombre, but yet a studied magnificence.
Shall I now add that the whole extant product of the plastic arts has herein its highest value, as history; as a stroke drawn in the portrait of that fate, perfect and beautiful, according to whose ordinations all beings advance to their beatitude?