organology

(redirected from organologist)
Also found in: Medical.

or·gan·ol·o·gy

 (ôr′gə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of biology that deals with the structure and function of organs.
2. The branch of musicology that deals with musical instruments and their construction, acoustic properties, classification, history, and broader cultural context.

or′gan·o·log′ic (ôr′gə-nə-lŏj′ĭk, ôr-găn′ə-), or′gan·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

organology

(ˌɔːɡəˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Biology) the study of the structure and function of the organs of animals and plants
organological adj
ˌorganˈologist n

organology

the study of the organs of plants and animals. — organologist, n. — organologic, organological, adj.
See also: Animals
the study of the structure and organs of plants and animals. — organologist, n. — organologic, organological, adj.
See also: Biology
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References in periodicals archive ?
Between the end of 2014 and the first months of 2015, the Royal Library acquired some music autographs of the Belgian composers Leon Frings, Guillaume Lekeu, and Gaston Knosp and, thanks to some donors, also extended its collections with hundreds of printed and manuscript scores, with one hundred letters written by the Belgian musicologist Paul Collaer during the First World War, and with the music archives of the Belgian organologist Jean-Pierre Felix (who died in 2014).
One of the latest publications dealing with this subject is a book by the organologist Petr Koukal, an employee of the workplace of the National Heritage Institute in Tele, with the rather canny title The Well-Untempered Organ, paraphrasing the title of Johann Sebastian Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier.
Jeremy Montagu, organologist and acquaintance of Brain, recalls that the early performances of the piece featured the 13th harmonic, but this was later changed:
And I am most interested, as an organologist (one who studies musical instruments), in low brass instruments of the early nineteenth century, an area where I am quite active professionally.
He was later able to bring the pragmatic approach of a scientist and engineer to his work as a harpsichord builder, repairer, restorer, performer and organologist.
The book is thus highly recommended for the technical specialist, restorer, and organologist.
Milan Guitar, musician, programmer, electronic gadget designer, organologist, pedagogue and writer, has been creating his own music for over three decades.
Cristina Bordas is an organologist and a lecturer in musicology at the Complutense University, Madrid.
Fortunately, copies of six of these were made before the war, by an anonymous transcriber who may have been Robert Eitner and/or by a German organologist, Gustav Fock.
Given that no other source known today calls the instrument anything but ala (or ele and suchlike), we are justified in agreeing with the organologist Pavel Kurfurst that in the Olomouc source the adjective "boemica" is meant simply to indicate or stress the provenance of the instrument, and not as its real title.
In the loving vocabulary of a true organologist, Waring begs for the listener's tolerance with what he terms the "kinetic endearments" of the unrestored organs: clunky pedals, clattery keys, clamorous stop actions, creaky organ benches, squeaky crank handles, and the like (p.
Historically, material evidence is amplified by written sources, and living regional genres also provide immense challenges for the organologist.