oriel


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o·ri·el

 (ôr′ē-əl)
n.
A bay window projecting from an upper floor, often supported from below with corbels or brackets.

[Middle English, from Old French oriol, porch, from Medieval Latin oriolum.]

o•ri•el

art at origen
(ˈɔr i əl, ˈoʊr-)

n.
a bay window, esp. one cantilevered or corbeled out from a wall.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French oriol porch, passage, gallery]

oriel

- A large, upper-story bay window, usually supported by brackets or on corbels.
See also related terms for supported.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oriel - a projecting bay window corbeled or cantilevered out from a walloriel - a projecting bay window corbeled or cantilevered out from a wall
bow window, bay window - a window that sticks out from the outside wall of a house
Translations

oriel

[ˈɔːrɪəl] Nmirador m

oriel (window)

nErker (→ fenster nt) m
References in classic literature ?
By the light of Our Lady's brow,'' said Prince John, ``our orders to him were most precise though it may be you heard them not, as we stood together in the oriel window Most clear and positive was our charge that Richard's safety should be cared for, and woe to Waldemar's head if he transgress it
The room is a large and lofty one, with an ample mullioned oriel window at one end; the walls, you see, are new, and not yet painted; but the furniture, though originally of an expensive sort, is old and scanty, and there is no drapery about the window.
You will find, however, Miss Morland, it would be reckoned a cheap thing by some people, for I might have sold it for ten guineas more the next day; Jackson, of Oriel, bid me sixty at once; Morland was with me at the time.
The large and spacious houses, with their oriel, latticed windows, their huge fireplaces, and their gabled roofs, breathe of the days of hose and doublet, of pearl-embroidered stomachers, and complicated oaths.
The library at Devenham Castle was a large and sombre apartment, with high oriel windows and bookcases reaching to the ceiling.
And would rather sit distrait by her oriel than ride gayly to the chase as of old.
When still quite a boy, Walter Raleigh went to Oriel College, Oxford, but we know nothing of what he did there, and the next we hear of him is that he is fighting for the Huguenots in France.
Behind us, two tall, shapely spruce trees rose up against the sunset, and through the dark oriel of their sundered branches an evening star looked down.
And he began already to be proud of being a Rugby boy, as he passed the schoolgates, with the oriel window above, and saw the boys standing there, looking as if the town belonged to them, and nodding in a familiar manner to the coachman, as if any one of them would be quite equal to getting on the box, and working the team down street as well as he.
It was the Normans who began to build that fine old hall, which is, like the town, telling of the thoughts and hands of widely sundered generations; but it is all so old that we look with loving pardon at its inconsistencies, and are well content that they who built the stone oriel, and they who built the Gothic facade and towers of finest small brickwork with the trefoil ornament, and the windows and battlements defined with stone, did not sacreligiously pull down the ancient half-timbered body with its oak-roofed banqueting-hall.
It was a very aged, ghostly place; the church had been built many hundreds of years ago, and had once had a convent or monastery attached; for arches in ruins, remains of oriel windows, and fragments of blackened walls, were yet standing-, while other portions of the old building, which had crumbled away and fallen down, were mingled with the churchyard earth and overgrown with grass, as if they too claimed a burying-place and sought to mix their ashes with the dust of men.
The hand lettering and signage expert produced a unique artwork celebrating the region's cultural, industrial and agricultural heritage, wrapping around the building's exterior Wrexham's arts manager, Steffan Jones-Hughes had been keen to commission Jonny, who was part of Oriel Wrecsam's A Child's Christmas in Wales exhibition in 2014 and this provided the perfect opportunity.