orifice


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Related to orifice: Orifice plate, Back Orifice

or·i·fice

 (ôr′ə-fĭs, ŏr′-)
n.
An opening, especially to a cavity or passage of the body; a mouth or vent.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin ōrificium : Latin ōs, ōr-, mouth; see ōs- in Indo-European roots + Latin -ficium, a making, doing (from facere, to make; see dhē- in Indo-European roots).]

or′i·fi′cial (-fĭsh′əl) adj.

orifice

(ˈɒrɪfɪs)
n
chiefly Technical an opening or mouth into a cavity; vent; aperture
[C16: via French from Late Latin ōrificium, from Latin ōs mouth + facere to make]

or•i•fice

(ˈɔr ə fɪs, ˈɒr-)

n.
an opening or aperture, as of a tube or pipe; a mouthlike opening or hole; mouth; vent.
[1535–45; < Middle French < Latin ōrificium=ōr- (s. of ōs) mouth + -fic-, comb. form of facere to make, do1]
or`i•fi′cial (-ˈfɪʃ əl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.orifice - an aperture or hole that opens into a bodily cavityorifice - an aperture or hole that opens into a bodily cavity; "the orifice into the aorta from the lower left chamber of the heart"
vent - external opening of urinary or genital system of a lower vertebrate
blastopore - the opening into the archenteron
aortic orifice - the orifice from the lower left chamber of the heart to the aorta
stoma - a mouth or mouthlike opening (especially one created by surgery on the surface of the body to create an opening to an internal organ)
passageway, passage - a path or channel or duct through or along which something may pass; "the nasal passages"
porta hepatis - opening for major blood vessels to enter and leave the liver
spiracle - a breathing orifice
mouth - the externally visible part of the oral cavity on the face and the system of organs surrounding the opening; "she wiped lipstick from her mouth"
os - a mouth or mouthlike opening
cervix uteri, uterine cervix, cervix - necklike opening to the uterus
fenestra - a small opening covered with membrane (especially one in the bone between the middle and inner ear)
cardia - the opening into the stomach and that part of the stomach connected to the esophagus
introitus - entrance or opening to a hollow organ or tube (especially the vaginal opening); "the introitus of the vagina"
external orifice, urethral orifice - the orifice through which urine is discharged
pylorus - a small circular opening between the stomach and the duodenum
anus - the excretory opening at the end of the alimentary canal
fontanel, fontanelle, soft spot - any membranous gap between the bones of the cranium in an infant or fetus
naris - any of the openings to the nasal cavities that allow air to flow through the cavities to the pharynx
rima - a narrow elongated opening or fissure between two symmetrical parts

orifice

noun opening, space, hole, split, mouth, gap, rent, breach, vent, pore, rupture, aperture, cleft, chink, fissure, perforation, interstice Viruses get into the body via any convenient orifice.

orifice

noun
An open space allowing passage:
Translations

orifice

[ˈɒrɪfɪs] Norificio m

orifice

[ˈɒrəfɪs] norifice m

orifice

nÖffnung f

orifice

[ˈɒrɪfɪs] norifizio

or·i·fice

n. orificio, salida, boquete, abertura.

orifice

n orificio
References in classic literature ?
The Indian youths instantly comprehended his meaning--for this time he spoke in the Delaware tongue--and tearing the gourd from the tree, they held it on high with an exulting shout, displaying a hole in its bottom, which had been but by the bullet, after passing through the usual orifice in the center of its upper side.
Which to our eyes discoverd new and strange, A triple-mounted row of Pillars laid On Wheels (for like to Pillars most they seem'd Or hollow'd bodies made of Oak or Firr With branches lopt, in Wood or Mountain fell'd) Brass, Iron, Stonie mould, had not thir mouthes With hideous orifice gap't on us wide, Portending hollow truce; at each behind A Seraph stood, and in his hand a Reed Stood waving tipt with fire; while we suspense, Collected stood within our thoughts amus'd, Not long, for sudden all at once thir Reeds Put forth, and to a narrow vent appli'd With nicest touch.
But when the disease was more stubborn and violent, he let in the muzzle while the bellows were full of wind, which he discharged into the body of the patient; then withdrew the instrument to replenish it, clapping his thumb strongly against the orifice of then fundament; and this being repeated three or four times, the adventitious wind would rush out, bringing the noxious along with it, (like water put into a pump), and the patient recovered.
Nor do we need to seek any other reason for the number of these pellicles beyond this that the orifice of the venous artery being of an oval shape from the nature of its situation, can be adequately closed with two, whereas the others being round are more conveniently closed with three.
At the summit was a circular orifice, by which I had caught the slight gleam of light, evidently daylight.
The young man cast a glance at the first musket and saw, with a certain degree of inquietude, that it was leveled in his direction; but as soon as he perceived that the orifice of the barrel was motionless, he threw himself upon the ground.
I observed a few the handles of which were mysteriously curved, as if intended to be introduced into the orifice of the ear, with a view perhaps of beating the tattoo upon the tympanum.
But her face was a larger and freer copy, and her mouth in especial a happy divergence from that conservative orifice, a little pair of lips at once plump and pinched, that looked, when closed, as if they could not open wider than to swallow a gooseberry or to emit an "Oh, dear, no
This at once recalled to Adam's mind the light quivering above the well-hole in the darkness of that inner room at Diana's Grove, Oolanga's awful shriek, and the hideous black face, now grown grey with terror, disappearing into the impenetrable gloom of the mysterious orifice.
This huge sack had been sewn up at one end and only a small orifice left at the other.
Below this repulsive orifice the face was quite blank to the chin, for the thing had no mouth that I could discover.
Stopcocks, of which one has an orifice twice the size of the other, communicate between these receptacles and a fourth one, which is called the mixture reservoir, since in it the two gases obtained by the decomposition of the water do really commingle.