oscillation


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Related to oscillation: damped oscillation
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oscillation
Oscillation of a clock pendulum takes it from point a to point b and back to a. The dashed red line is the position of the pendulum at rest.

os·cil·la·tion

 (ŏs′ə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The action of oscillating.
b. The state of being oscillated.
2. A single oscillatory cycle.

os′cil·la′tion·al adj.

oscillation

(ˌɒsɪˈleɪʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) physics statistics
a. regular fluctuation in value, position, or state about a mean value, such as the variation in an alternating current or the regular swinging of a pendulum
b. a single cycle of such a fluctuation
2. the act or process of oscillating
oscillatory adj

os•cil•la•tion

(ˌɒs əˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of oscillating.
2.
a. a single swing in one direction of an oscillating body.
b. a single fluctuation between the maximum and minimum values of an oscillatory cycle.
[1650–60; < Latin]
os′cil•la•to`ry (-ləˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
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oscillation
The time it takes the pendulum to swing from a to b and back to a is known as its period. The dashed red line from the central point represents the position of the pendulum at rest.

os·cil·la·tion

(ŏs′ə-lā′shən)
1. A steady, uninterrupted, backward and forward swinging about a central point. Compare vibration.
2. A single cycle of motion about a central position.

oscillation

A repetitive vibration with a regular frequency.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oscillation - the process of oscillating between statesoscillation - the process of oscillating between states
libration - (astronomy) a real or apparent slow oscillation of a moon or satellite; "the libration of the moon"
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
2.oscillation - (physics) a regular periodic variation in value about a mean
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
ripple - (electronics) an oscillation of small amplitude imposed on top of a steady value
undulation, wave - (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
transient - (physics) a short-lived oscillation in a system caused by a sudden change of voltage or current or load
beat - a single pulsation of an oscillation produced by adding two waves of different frequencies; has a frequency equal to the difference between the two oscillations
resonance - a vibration of large amplitude produced by a relatively small vibration near the same frequency of vibration as the natural frequency of the resonating system
sympathetic vibration - (physics) vibration produced by resonance
3.oscillation - a single complete execution of a periodically repeated phenomenon; "a year constitutes a cycle of the seasons"
periodic event, recurrent event - an event that recurs at intervals
cardiac cycle - the complete cycle of events in the heart from the beginning of one heart beat to the beginning of the next; an electrical impulse conducted through the heart muscle that constricts the atria which is followed by constriction of the ventricles; "the cardiac cycle can be shown on an electrocardiogram"
Carnot cycle, Carnot's ideal cycle - a cycle (of expansion and compression) of an idealized reversible heat engine that does work without loss of heat
pass - one complete cycle of operations (as by a computer); "it was not possible to complete the computation in a single pass"
menstrual cycle - a recurring cycle (beginning at menarche and ending at menopause) in which the endometrial lining of the uterus prepares for pregnancy; if pregnancy does not occur the lining is shed at menstruation; "the average menstrual cycle is 28 days"

oscillation

Translations

oscillation

[ˌɒsɪˈleɪʃən] N
1. (Phys) → oscilación f; [of prices] → fluctuación f
2. (fig) → oscilación f

oscillation

[ˌɒsɪˈleɪʃən] n
(= movement) [object] → oscillation f
(= variation) → oscillation f
oscillations in sth [+ level, value, temperature] → oscillations de qch
oscillation between → oscillation entre

oscillation

n (Phys) → Oszillation f, → Schwingung f; (of compass needle etc) → Schwanken nt; (rapid) → Zittern nt; (= individual movement etc)Schwankung f

oscillation

[ˌɒsɪˈleɪʃn] noscillazione f

os·cil·la·tion

n. oscilación, movimiento de vaivén, tal como el de un péndulo.
References in classic literature ?
In fact, we must not dissemble that the oscillation of the tall trees and the reflection of the moon in the dark underwood gave him serious uneasiness.
A slight oscillation showed Dantes that all went well.
He was in that happy calm of the first sleep, which, with Porthos, resisted the noise of bells or the report of cannon; his head swam in that soft oscillation which reminds us of the soothing movement of a ship.
Encompassed in a luminous cloud, of which he was now merely the fiery heart, without material substance, he swung through unthinkable arcs of oscillation, like a vast pendulum.
His legs were wide apart, and he leant against the partition in order to steady himself amidst the pitching and oscillation of the airship.
She watched the oscillation of the tube, and at the same moment became conscious of the individuality of the house in which she stood; she heard the soft domestic sounds of regular existence upon staircases and floors above her head, and movements through the wall in the house next door.
Slowly the vicious head came floating up, while at every oscillation a fresh burst of shrieks came from the settee.
Heat is but the motion of atoms, a simple oscillation of the particles of a body.
At Punta Gorda, in Banda Oriental, I found an alternation of the Pampaean estuary deposit, with a limestone containing some of the same extinct sea-shells; and this shows either a change in the former currents, or more probably an oscillation of level in the bottom of the ancient estuary.
In almost all climes the tortoise and the frog are among the precursors and heralds of this season, and birds fly with song and glancing plumage, and plants spring and bloom, and winds blow, to correct this slight oscillation of the poles and preserve the equilibrium of nature.
Soon he discovered that by wriggling his body in just the right way at the proper time he could diminish or accelerate his oscillation, and, being a boy, he chose, naturally, to accelerate.
But it is just in that cold, abominable half despair, half belief, in that conscious burying oneself alive for grief in the underworld for forty years, in that acutely recognised and yet partly doubtful hopelessness of one's position, in that hell of unsatisfied desires turned inward, in that fever of oscillations, of resolutions determined for ever and repented of again a minute later--that the savour of that strange enjoyment of which I have spoken lies.