osmoregulation


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os·mo·reg·u·la·tion

 (ŏz′mə-rĕg′yə-lā′shən)
n.
Maintenance of an optimal, constant osmotic pressure in the body of a living organism.


os′mo·reg′u·la·to′ry (-lə-tôr′ē) adj.

osmoregulation

(ˌɒzməʊˌrɛɡjʊˈleɪʃən)
n
(Zoology) zoology the adjustment of the osmotic pressure of a cell or organism in relation to the surrounding fluid
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References in periodicals archive ?
Any deviation from the optimum salinity involves osmoregulation and enhanced energy needs to be put into associated processes (Silva & Wright 1994, Deaton 2001, Kube et al.
Various physiological and molecular mechanisms associated with plant salt tolerance, including those related to osmoregulation, reactive oxygen species detoxification, ion balance control and signaling events, have been introduced into model and crop plants with the purpose of increasing salt tolerance, as recently reviewed by Reguera et al.
Thus, PBG 5 plants with better stress tolerance had efficient osmoregulation mechanisms to avoid fluctuations in their cytosol in order to maintain growth under stressful environment (NaCl).
Pacific salmon behavior during their spawning migration includes periods of osmoregulation and thermoregulation prior to river entry, which might involve milling behavior for extended periods of time (Banks, 1969).
A systems-level analysis of perfect adaptation in yeast osmoregulation.
The decrease of the growth rate with increasing salinity of both studied species may be related to molybdate-sulphate concentrations and osmoregulation (Howarth et al.
When the ENB was surgically removed, the patient's osmoregulation returned to normal--that is, his SIADH resolved completely, which suggested that the SIADH was paraneoplastic in nature.
Role of Amino acids in osmoregulation of non-halophilic bacteria.
Land snail shells serve as a calcium source for various organisms that feed on them, especially for eggshell formation, muscle contraction, and osmoregulation (Graveland & van der Wal 1996; Hottop 2002).
5) However, 2 to 10 years after CNS invasion, the dormant cysts may die, lose osmoregulation, absorb fluid and disintegrate, releasing antigens that set up variable degrees of inflammation.