ostentation


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Related to ostentation: censurer, garishness, unassailed

os·ten·ta·tion

 (ŏs′tĕn-tā′shən, -tən-)
n.
1. Pretentious display meant to impress others; pretentious showiness.
2. Archaic The act or an instance of showing; an exhibition.

[Middle English ostentacioun, from Old French ostentacion, from Latin ostentātiō, ostentātiōn-, from ostentāre, frequentative of ostendere, to show; see ostensible.]

ostentation

(ˌɒstɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
pretentious, showy, or vulgar display

os•ten•ta•tion

(ˌɒs tɛnˈteɪ ʃən, -tən-)

n.
1. pretentious or conspicuous display intended to impress others.
2. Archaic. the act of showing or displaying.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin ostentātiō, derivative of ostentā(re) to display, frequentative of ostendere to present, display]

Ostentation

 of peacocks; a spectacular show or exhibition, 1388.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ostentation - a gaudy outward displayostentation - a gaudy outward display    
display - exhibiting openly in public view; "a display of courage"
bravado, bluster - a swaggering show of courage
exhibitionism - extravagant and conspicuous behavior intended to attract attention to yourself
ritz - ostentatious display of elegance; "they put on the ritz"
splurge - an ostentatious display (of effort or extravagance etc.)
pedantry - an ostentatious and inappropriate display of learning
2.ostentation - lack of elegance as a consequence of being pompous and puffed up with vanity
inelegance - the quality of lacking refinement and good taste
3.ostentation - pretentious or showy or vulgar display
pretentiousness, pretension, largeness - the quality of being pretentious (behaving or speaking in such a manner as to create a false appearance of great importance or worth)

ostentation

ostentation

noun
Boastful self-importance or display:
Translations
تَظاهُر بِ، تَباهٍ
praleri
kérkedés
sÿndarmennska

ostentation

[ˌɒstenˈteɪʃən] Nostentación f, boato m

ostentation

[ˌɒstɛnˈteɪʃən] nostentation f

ostentation

n
(= pretentious display) (of wealth etc)Pomp m; (of skills etc)Großtuerei f
(= obviousness)aufdringliche or penetrante Deutlichkeit; with ostentationdemonstrativ, ostentativ; without ostentationbetont unauffällig

ostentation

[ˌɒstɛnˈteɪʃn] nostentazione f

ostentatious

(ostenˈteiʃəs) adjective
behaving, done etc in such a way as to be seen by other people and to impress them. Their style of living is very ostentatious.
ˌostenˈtation noun
ˌostenˈtatiousness noun
ˌostenˈtatiously adverb
References in classic literature ?
But to be candid without ostentation or design-- to take the good of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad-- belongs to you alone.
There was too much ostentation, and so I came away.
In preparing these for use he manifested all the ostentation of a professed cook, although the chief mystery of the affair appeared to consist in pouring water in judicious quantities upon the slimy contents of his cocoanut shells.
A French Canadian is too vain and mercurial a being to withstand the finery and ostentation of the feather.
I quite understand, sir," said the undertaker, "you don't want any show and that--I'm not a believer in ostentation myself, mind you--but you want it done gentlemanly-like.
How they pile the poor little craft mast-high with fine clothes and big houses; with useless servants, and a host of swell friends that do not care twopence for them, and that they do not care three ha'pence for; with expensive entertainments that nobody enjoys, with formalities and fashions, with pretence and ostentation, and with - oh, heaviest, maddest lumber of all
There were some warlike trophies displayed without ostentation, a handsome writing-table on which stood a telephone.
Lady Lundie's fidelity to the memory of the late Sir Thomas, on the scene of his last illness and death, persisted in asserting itself, under an ostentation of concealment which tried even the trained temper of Sir Patrick himself.
This conflict began soon to produce very strong and visible effects: for he lost all his usual sprightliness and gaiety of temper, and became not only melancholy when alone, but dejected and absent in company; nay, if ever he put on a forced mirth, to comply with Mr Western's humour, the constraint appeared so plain, that he seemed to have been giving the strongest evidence of what he endeavoured to conceal by such ostentation.
And then Schliemann went on to outline some of the wastes of competition: the losses of industrial warfare; the ceaseless worry and friction; the vices--such as drink, for instance, the use of which had nearly doubled in twenty years, as a consequence of the intensification of the economic struggle; the idle and unproductive members of the community, the frivolous rich and the pauperized poor; the law and the whole machinery of repression; the wastes of social ostentation, the milliners and tailors, the hairdressers, dancing masters, chefs and lackeys.
That is the rationale of the system of charging which has hitherto obtained; and nothing is more offensive than this ostentation of reform, where there is no real amelioration.
In Belgium, provided you can make money, you may save it; this is scarcely possible in England; ostentation there lavishes in a month what industry has earned in a year.