ostentation


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Related to ostentation: censurer, garishness, unassailed

os·ten·ta·tion

 (ŏs′tĕn-tā′shən, -tən-)
n.
1. Pretentious display meant to impress others; pretentious showiness.
2. Archaic The act or an instance of showing; an exhibition.

[Middle English ostentacioun, from Old French ostentacion, from Latin ostentātiō, ostentātiōn-, from ostentāre, frequentative of ostendere, to show; see ostensible.]

ostentation

(ˌɒstɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
pretentious, showy, or vulgar display

os•ten•ta•tion

(ˌɒs tɛnˈteɪ ʃən, -tən-)

n.
1. pretentious or conspicuous display intended to impress others.
2. Archaic. the act of showing or displaying.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin ostentātiō, derivative of ostentā(re) to display, frequentative of ostendere to present, display]

Ostentation

 of peacocks; a spectacular show or exhibition, 1388.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ostentation - a gaudy outward displayostentation - a gaudy outward display    
display - exhibiting openly in public view; "a display of courage"
bravado, bluster - a swaggering show of courage
exhibitionism - extravagant and conspicuous behavior intended to attract attention to yourself
ritz - ostentatious display of elegance; "they put on the ritz"
splurge - an ostentatious display (of effort or extravagance etc.)
pedantry - an ostentatious and inappropriate display of learning
2.ostentation - lack of elegance as a consequence of being pompous and puffed up with vanity
inelegance - the quality of lacking refinement and good taste
3.ostentation - pretentious or showy or vulgar display
pretentiousness, pretension, largeness - the quality of being pretentious (behaving or speaking in such a manner as to create a false appearance of great importance or worth)

ostentation

ostentation

noun
Boastful self-importance or display:
Translations
تَظاهُر بِ، تَباهٍ
praleri
kérkedés
sÿndarmennska

ostentation

[ˌɒstenˈteɪʃən] Nostentación f, boato m

ostentation

[ˌɒstɛnˈteɪʃən] nostentation f

ostentation

n
(= pretentious display) (of wealth etc)Pomp m; (of skills etc)Großtuerei f
(= obviousness)aufdringliche or penetrante Deutlichkeit; with ostentationdemonstrativ, ostentativ; without ostentationbetont unauffällig

ostentation

[ˌɒstɛnˈteɪʃn] nostentazione f

ostentatious

(ostenˈteiʃəs) adjective
behaving, done etc in such a way as to be seen by other people and to impress them. Their style of living is very ostentatious.
ˌostenˈtation noun
ˌostenˈtatiousness noun
ˌostenˈtatiously adverb
References in classic literature ?
In less than a week they found themselves regretting--not the new villa on the slope of Devil's Ford, which even in its own bizarre fashion was exceeded by the barbarous ostentation of the villas and private houses around them--but the double cabin under the trees, which now seemed to them almost aristocratic in its grave simplicity and abstention.
Their life is a contest among themselves for supremacy in ostentation and recklessness, in the destroying of useful and necessary things, in the wasting of the labor and the lives of their fellow creatures, the toil and anguish of the nations, the sweat and tears and blood of the human race
One day, without consulting Legree, she suddenly took it upon her, with some considerable ostentation, to change all the furniture and appurtenances of the room to one at some considerable distance.
In turn he took his place in the reading class and made a botch of it; then in the geography class and turned lakes into mountains, mountains into rivers, and rivers into continents, till chaos was come again; then in the spelling class, and got "turned down," by a succession of mere baby words, till he brought up at the foot and yielded up the pewter medal which he had worn with ostentation for months.
There would have been either the ostentation of a coxcomb, or the evasions of a mind too weak to defend its own vanities.
I could not but observe that he had been peeling the lemons with his own clasp-knife, which, as became the knife of a practical settler, was about a foot long; and which he wiped, not wholly without ostentation, on the sleeve of his coat.
There will be no employment for anyone except in doing things that must be done on the spot, such as unpacking and distributing the imports, ministering to the proprietors as domestic servants, or by acting, preaching, paving, lighting, housebuilding, and the rest; and some of these, as the capitalist comes to regard ostentation as vulgar, and to enjoy a simpler life, will employ fewer and fewer people.
There was too much ostentation, and so I came away.
Such was the life I led in my parents' house and if I have depicted it thus minutely, it is not out of ostentation, or to let you know that I am rich, but that you may see how, without any fault of mine, I have fallen from the happy condition I have described, to the misery I am in at present.
But to be candid without ostentation or design-- to take the good of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad-- belongs to you alone.
Scarron seemed not to observe that certain of his guests had talked mysteriously, that letters had passed from hand to hand and that the assembly had seemed to have a secret purpose quite apart from the literary discussion carried on with so much ostentation.
The officers of the British army, and the loyal gentry of the province, most of whom were collected within the beleaguered town, had been invited to a masked ball; for it was the policy of Sir William Howe to hide the distress and danger of the period, and the desperate aspect of the siege, under an ostentation of festivity.