osteochondral


Also found in: Medical.
Translations

osteochondral

n. osteocondral, rel. a o compuesto de hueso y cartílago.
References in periodicals archive ?
Osteochondral information will be provided by high-frequency US while OA imaging will allow the high-sensitivity imaging of microvasculature in inflamed tissue.
In late phases of OA, a decreased amount of joint fluid and destruction of the osteochondral junction may induce injury to the nerve endings in this area.
The foot and ankle section includes a review of osteochondral lesions of the talus.
Osteochondral allograft transplantation for cartilage damage
10) MR arthrography is selectively performed for increased accuracy in detecting ulnar collateral ligament tears, osteochondral defects and intraarticular bodies.
He recommends I have osteochondral allograft transplant surgery (OATS).
A recentlyperformed MRI in a local hospital revealed a Grade3 osteochondral fracture along the anterior surface of the medial femoral condyle with underlying bone edema," Dr Sohail Saleem, General Manager, sports medicine, Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) said on Tuesday.
The magnitude of that potential clearly is evident, too, in the various applications now underway: Silver nanoparticles, for instance, are being used to prevent infections, while nanocomposite scaffolds show promise in repairing osteochondral knee defects and nanofibers are proving an effective alternative to thick, stiff surgical mesh.
Articular cartilage has limited repair capacity, and marrow-stimulation procedures such as microfracture, osteochondral grafts, and autologous cartilage implantations have had limited success in articular cartilage defects.
8] While tissue engineering is still in its technological infancy, scaffolds have been clinically successful in building bladder and bronchus, [9] bone, osteochondral tissue, cartilage and skin.
Intraoperatively, it was noticed that the osteochondral junction of the nasal dorsum was not smooth, that there were some adhesions between the nasal dorsum and the subcutaneous tissue, and that the keystone area was very soft.
Saxena has published a great deal of research--over 100 articles and book chapters--in areas related to lower-extremity sports injury, including Achilles, Lisfranc's and Peroneal tendon pathologies; transplants and osteochondral injuries related to ankle reconstruction; arthritis; and stress fractures (both navicular and sesamoid).