out of


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Related to out of: Out of body experience, Out of the money

out of

prep.
1.
a. From within to the outside of: got out of the car.
b. From a given condition: came out of her trance.
c. From an origin, source, or cause: made out of wood; did it out of spite.
d. In, especially intermittently in: works out of the main office.
2.
a. In a position or situation beyond the range, boundaries, limits, or sphere of: The plane flew out of sight.
b. In a state or position away from the expected or usual: out of practice; out of touch with reality.
3. From among: five out of six votes.
4. In or into a condition of no longer having: We're out of coffee. We were tricked out of our savings.
Idiom:
out of it Informal
1. Not aware of or participating in a particular group, pursuit, or trend.
2. Disoriented or inebriated.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.out of - motivated by; "idleness is the trait of being idle out of a reluctance to work"
Translations
بِدون نَفَسبِسَبَبخارِج، بَعيد عنمنَمن بَيْن
affrastakåndetudenvæk fra
kifogyott
afekki viîkominn í òrot meî; lafmóîurúrút/upp úr
den-den-den/dan dışarda-den/dan dışarı-den/dan dolayı

out of

prep
(= outside, away from) (position) → nicht in (+dat), → außerhalb (+gen); (motion) → aus (+dat); (fig)außer (+dat); I’ll be out of town all weekich werde die ganze Woche (über) nicht in der Stadt sein; to go/be out of the countryaußer Landes gehen/sein; he was out of the room at the timeer war zu dem Zeitpunkt nicht im Zimmer; he walked out of the roomer ging aus dem Zimmer (hinaus); he went out of the doorer ging zur Tür hinaus; as soon as he was out of the doorsobald er draußen war or zur Tür hinaus war; to look out of the windowaus dem Fenster sehen, zum Fenster hinaussehen; I saw him out of the windowich sah ihn durchs Fenster; to keep out of the sunnicht in die Sonne gehen; out of danger/sightaußer Gefahr/Sicht; get out of my sight!geh mir aus den Augen!; he’s out of the tournamenter ist aus dem Turnier ausgeschieden; he feels out of it (inf)er kommt sich (dat)ausgeschlossen vor, er fühlt sich ausgeschlossen; to be out of it (Brit sl: = drunk) → besoffen or dicht sein (inf); they were 150 miles out of Hamburg (Naut) → sie waren 150 Meilen von Hamburg weg or vor Hamburg; three days out of portdrei Tage nach dem Auslaufen aus dem Hafen/vor dem Einlaufen in den Hafen; he lives 10 miles out of Londoner wohnt 10 Meilen außerhalb Londons; you’re well out of it (inf)so ist es besser für dich
(cause, motive) → aus (+dat); out of curiosityaus Neugier
(indicating origins or source) → aus (+dat); to drink out of a glassaus einem Glas trinken; made out of silveraus Silber (gemacht); a filly out of the same mareein Fohlen ntvon derselben Stute
(= from among)von (+dat); in seven cases out of tenin sieben von zehn Fällen; one out of every four smokerseiner von vier Rauchern; he picked one out of the pileer nahm einen aus dem Stapel (heraus)
(= without) out of breathaußer Atem; we are out of money/breadwir haben kein Geld/Brot mehr, das Geld/Brot ist alle (inf)

out

(aut)
1. adverb, adjective not in a building etc; from inside a building etc; in(to) the open air. The children are out in the garden; They went out for a walk.
2. adverb from inside (something). He opened the desk and took out a pencil.
3. adverb, adjective away from home, an office etc. We had an evening out; The manager is out.
4. adverb, adjective far away. The ship was out at sea; He went out to India.
5. adverb loudly and clearly. He shouted out the answer.
6. adverb completely. She was tired out.
7. adverb, adjective not correct. My calculations seem to be out.
8. adverb, adjective free, known, available etc. He let the cat out; The secret is out.
9. adverb, adjective (in games) having been defeated. The batsman was (caught) out.
10. adverb, adjective on strike. The men came out in protest.
11. adverb, adjective no longer in fashion. Long hair is definitely out.
12. adverb, adjective (of the tide) with the water at or going to its lowest level. The tide is (going) out.
13. adjective unacceptable. That suggestion is definitely out.
(as part of a word)
1. not inside or near, as in out-lying.
2. indicating outward movement, as in outburst.
3. indicating that the action goes further or beyond a normal action, as in outshine.
ˈouter adjective
outside; far from (the centre of) something. outer space.
ˈoutermost adjective
nearest the edge, outside etc. the outermost ring on the target.
ˈouting noun
a usually short trip, made for pleasure. an outing to the seaside.
ˈoutward adjective
1. on or towards the outside; able to be seen. Judging by his outward appearance, he's not very rich; no outward sign of unhappiness.
2. (of a journey) away from. The outward journey will be by sea, but they will return home by air.
ˈoutwardly adverb
in appearance. Outwardly he is cheerful, but he is really a very unhappy person.
ˈoutwards adverb
towards the outside edge or surface. Moving outwards from the centre of the painting, we see that the figures become smaller.
ˈout-and-out adjective
very bad. an out-and-out liar.
out-of-datedateout-of-pocket adjective
paid in cash; paid out of your own pocket. out-of-pocket expenses.
be out of pocket
to have no money; to lose money. I can't pay you now as I'm out of pocket at the moment.
out of printprintout of sight
1. no longer visible; where you cannot see something or be seen. They watched the ship sailing until it was out of sight; Put it out of sight.
2. an old expression meaning wonderful, fantastic. The show was out of sight.
out of sight, out of mind
an expression describing a situation in which someone is forgotten when he/she is not around. They used to be close friends, but since he left it has become a case of out of sight, out of mind.
ˌout-of-the-ˈway adjective
difficult to reach or arrive at. an out-of-the-way place.
be out for
to be wanting or intending to get. She is out for revenge.
be out to
to be determined to. He is out to win the race.
out of
1. from inside. He took it out of the bag.
2. not in. Mr Smith is out of the office; out of danger; out of sight.
3. from among. Four out of five people like this song.
4. having none left. She is quite out of breath.
5. because of. He did it out of curiosity/spite.
6. from. He drank the lemonade straight out of the bottle.
out of doors
outside. We like to eat out of doors in summer.
out of it
1. not part of a group, activity etc. I felt a bit out of it at the party.
2. no longer involved in something. That was a crazy scheme – I'm glad to be out of it.
out of orderorderout of the way
unusual. There was nothing out of the way about what she said.
out of this worldworldout of workwork
References in classic literature ?
To be sure, in cold weather you may carry your house aloft with you, in the shape of a watch-coat; but properly speaking the thickest watch-coat is no more of a house than the unclad body; for as the soul is glued inside of its fleshly tabernacle, and cannot freely move about in it, nor even move out of it, without running great risk of perishing (like an ignorant pilgrim crossing the snowy Alps in winter); so a watch-coat is not so much of a house as it is a mere envelope, or additional skin encasing you.
She came up to me, claimed me as an acquaintance, stared me out of countenance; and talked and laughed till I did not know which way to look.
Every now and then, after Tom went to bed, he had sudden wakings out of his sleep, and his first thought was, "Oh, joy, it was all a dream
She was not a convert, nor was her aunt who sat on the other side of her, and who, visiting from the country where at that time the Salvation Army was not, had dropped in to the meeting for half an hour out of curiosity.
And as I looked I suddenly became aware that a face was watching me out of one of the upper windows.
Poyser in a hard voice, rolling and unrolling her knitting and looking icily out of the window, as she continued to stand opposite the squire.
The musketeer sifted all he possibly could out of the host, whom he found cunning, mistrustful, and devoted, body and soul, to M.
Dorlcote Mill's been in our family a hundred year and better, and nobody ever heard of a Pivart meddling with the river, till this fellow came and bought Bincome's farm out of hand, before anybody else could so much as say 'snap.
Time out of mind the piratical proas of the Malays, lurking among the low shaded coves and islets of Sumatra, have sallied out upon the vessels sailing through the straits, fiercely demanding tribute at the point of their spears.
In a few minutes she had ascended out of that clear field, in among the piled mountains of cloud.
I governed it to perfection for ten days; and lost my rest all the time; and learned to look down upon all the governments in the world; I got out of it by taking to flight, and fell into a pit where I gave myself up for dead, and out of which I escaped alive by a miracle.
I knew, just as sure as I was standing there on one leg, that this was the sort of girl who would have me and Gentleman out of that house about three seconds after the clergyman had tied the knot.