out of bounds


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bound 1

 (bound)
intr.v. bound·ed, bound·ing, bounds
1. To leap forward or upward; jump; spring: The dog bounded over the gate.
2. To move forward by leaps or springs: The deer bounded into the woods.
3. To spring back from a surface; rebound: The basketball bounded off the backboard.
n.
1. A leap; a jump: The deer was away in a single bound.
2. A springing back from a surface after hitting it; a bounce: caught the ball on the bound.

[French bondir, to bounce, from Old French, to resound, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bombitīre, from Latin bombitāre, to hum, from bombus, a humming sound, from Greek bombos.]

bound 2

 (bound)
n.
1. often bounds A boundary; a limit: Our joy knew no bounds. Your remarks exceed the bounds of reason.
2. bounds The territory on, within, or near limiting lines: the bounds of the kingdom.
v. bound·ed, bound·ing, bounds
v.tr.
1. To set a limit to; confine: a high wall that bounded the prison yard; lives that were bounded by poverty.
2. To constitute the boundary or limit of: a city park that was bounded by busy streets.
3. To identify the boundaries of; demarcate.
v.intr.
To border on another place, state, or country.
Idioms:
in/within bounds Sports
Within the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore in play or legal.
out of bounds
1. Sports Outside the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore not in play or legal.
2. Outside the boundary of where one is allowed to be; in a forbidden or unauthorized place: The research lab is out of bounds for first-year students.
3. In violation of acceptable rules or standards, as of decency: felt the guest's behavior was out of bounds.

[Middle English, from Old French bodne, bonde and Anglo-Norman bunde, both from Medieval Latin bodina, of Celtic origin.]

bound 3

 (bound)
v.
Past tense and past participle of bind.
adj.
1. Confined by bonds; tied: bound hostages.
2. Being under legal or moral obligation: bound by my promise.
3. Equipped with a cover or binding: bound volumes.
4. Predetermined; certain: We're bound to be late.
5. Determined; resolved: Many public policy students are bound to be politicians one day.
6. Linguistics Being a form, especially a morpheme, that cannot stand as an independent word, such as a prefix or suffix.
7. Constipated.

bound 4

 (bound)
adj.
Headed or intending to head in a specified direction: commuters bound for home; a south-bound train.

[Alteration of Middle English boun, ready, from Old Norse būinn, past participle of būa, to get ready; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

out of bounds

adj, adv (postpositive)
1. (often foll by to) not to be entered (by); barred (to): out of bounds to civilians.
2. outside specified or prescribed limits
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.out of bounds - a line that marks the side boundary of a playing fieldout of bounds - a line that marks the side boundary of a playing field
line - in games or sports; a mark indicating positions or bounds of the playing area
touchline - either of the sidelines in soccer or rugby
Translations
مِحْظور الدُّخول إليها
zakázaný
forbudt område
á bannsvæîi
girilmesi yasak

bound3

(baund) noun
(usually in plural) limits of some kind. beyond the bounds of coincidence.
ˈboundless adjective
having no limit. boundless energy.
out of bounds
outside the permitted area or limits. The cinema was out of bounds for the boys from the local boarding-school.
References in periodicals archive ?
Get to the nearest sideline and get out of bounds if you cannot score.
But Kelly came down with his left shoe a foot out of bounds.
To preserve as much time as possible, the ball-carriers should get out of bounds.