out of sight


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sight

 (sīt)
n.
1.
a. The ability to see.
b. Field of vision: out of my sight.
2.
a. The act or fact of seeing: hoping for a sight of land; caught sight of a rare bird.
b. Something seen: That bird is a rare sight around here.
c. Something worth seeing; a spectacle: the sights of London.
d. Informal Something unsightly or ridiculous: looked a sight after crossing the swamp.
3. The foreseeable future; prospect: no solution in sight.
4. Mental perception or consideration: We lost sight of the purpose of our visit.
5.
a. often sights A device used to assist aim by guiding the eye, as on a firearm or surveying instrument.
b. An aim or observation taken with such a device.
v. sight·ed, sight·ing, sights
v.tr.
1. To perceive with the eyes; get sight of: sighted land after 40 days at sea.
2. To observe through a sight or an optical instrument: sight a target.
3. To adjust the sights of (a rifle, for example).
4. To take aim with (a firearm).
v.intr.
1. To direct one's gaze; look carefully.
2. To take aim: sighted along the barrel of the gun.
Idioms:
a sight Upper Southern US
A lot; much: We're a sight better off without him.
on sight
Immediately upon being seen: threatened to shoot looters on sight.
out of sight Slang
Remarkable; incredible: The graduation party was out of sight.
sight for sore eyes Informal
One whom it is a relief or joy to see.
sight unseen
Without seeing the object in question: bought the horse sight unseen.

[Middle English, from Old English sihth, gesiht, something seen; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.out of sight - not accessible to view; "concealed (or hidden) damage"; "in stormy weather the stars are out of sight"
invisible, unseeable - impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye; "the invisible man"; "invisible rays"; "an invisible hinge"; "invisible mending"
Adv.1.out of sight - no longer visible; "the ship disappeared behind the horizon and passed out of sight"
2.out of sight - quietly in concealment; "he lay doggo"

out of sight

adjective
Slang. Far beyond what is usual, normal, or customary:
Informal: standout.
Slang: awesome.
Translations
رائِع، خَياليغَيْر مَرْئي، خارِج مجال الرُّؤْيَه
fantastiskt
már: már nem is gondol rámihelyt nem látjanem látható
bezo sporu úžasnýnemať peniazez očízíde z očí, zíde z mysle
görülmemişgözden ırak olan gönülden de ırak olurgözden uzakşahane

out

(aut)
1. adverb, adjective not in a building etc; from inside a building etc; in(to) the open air. The children are out in the garden; They went out for a walk.
2. adverb from inside (something). He opened the desk and took out a pencil.
3. adverb, adjective away from home, an office etc. We had an evening out; The manager is out.
4. adverb, adjective far away. The ship was out at sea; He went out to India.
5. adverb loudly and clearly. He shouted out the answer.
6. adverb completely. She was tired out.
7. adverb, adjective not correct. My calculations seem to be out.
8. adverb, adjective free, known, available etc. He let the cat out; The secret is out.
9. adverb, adjective (in games) having been defeated. The batsman was (caught) out.
10. adverb, adjective on strike. The men came out in protest.
11. adverb, adjective no longer in fashion. Long hair is definitely out.
12. adverb, adjective (of the tide) with the water at or going to its lowest level. The tide is (going) out.
13. adjective unacceptable. That suggestion is definitely out.
(as part of a word)
1. not inside or near, as in out-lying.
2. indicating outward movement, as in outburst.
3. indicating that the action goes further or beyond a normal action, as in outshine.
ˈouter adjective
outside; far from (the centre of) something. outer space.
ˈoutermost adjective
nearest the edge, outside etc. the outermost ring on the target.
ˈouting noun
a usually short trip, made for pleasure. an outing to the seaside.
ˈoutward adjective
1. on or towards the outside; able to be seen. Judging by his outward appearance, he's not very rich; no outward sign of unhappiness.
2. (of a journey) away from. The outward journey will be by sea, but they will return home by air.
ˈoutwardly adverb
in appearance. Outwardly he is cheerful, but he is really a very unhappy person.
ˈoutwards adverb
towards the outside edge or surface. Moving outwards from the centre of the painting, we see that the figures become smaller.
ˈout-and-out adjective
very bad. an out-and-out liar.
out-of-datedateout-of-pocket adjective
paid in cash; paid out of your own pocket. out-of-pocket expenses.
be out of pocket
to have no money; to lose money. I can't pay you now as I'm out of pocket at the moment.
out of printprintout of sight
1. no longer visible; where you cannot see something or be seen. They watched the ship sailing until it was out of sight; Put it out of sight.
2. an old expression meaning wonderful, fantastic. The show was out of sight.
out of sight, out of mind
an expression describing a situation in which someone is forgotten when he/she is not around. They used to be close friends, but since he left it has become a case of out of sight, out of mind.
ˌout-of-the-ˈway adjective
difficult to reach or arrive at. an out-of-the-way place.
be out for
to be wanting or intending to get. She is out for revenge.
be out to
to be determined to. He is out to win the race.
out of
1. from inside. He took it out of the bag.
2. not in. Mr Smith is out of the office; out of danger; out of sight.
3. from among. Four out of five people like this song.
4. having none left. She is quite out of breath.
5. because of. He did it out of curiosity/spite.
6. from. He drank the lemonade straight out of the bottle.
out of doors
outside. We like to eat out of doors in summer.
out of it
1. not part of a group, activity etc. I felt a bit out of it at the party.
2. no longer involved in something. That was a crazy scheme – I'm glad to be out of it.
out of orderorderout of the way
unusual. There was nothing out of the way about what she said.
out of this worldworldout of workwork
References in periodicals archive ?
BRIAN O'DRISCOLL claimed Ireland will pay Namibia the ultimate compliment tomorrow -by hammering them out of sight.
Colomiers never hesitated in attack and when Lhande made a break from more line-out possession, Fabien Galthie took a pass from David Skrela to take any Pontypridd victory out of sight.