out-marriage

out-marriage

n
a marriage to someone outside one's ethnic group
References in periodicals archive ?
In one of my classes, it came out that the out-marriage rate among Filipino women in the US was high, at 38 percent, compared to 5 percent among Chinese women and 9 percent among the Japanese,' said this former professor of Ethnic Studies at the San Francisco State University who migrated to the US with his family when he was 8.
As tribes who suffered genocidal policies, boarding-school laws and now out-marriage try to recover their identity in the 20th century, some are more fractured, and they appear to lack the kind of common elements that lead to true cohesion.
155) About one-fifth of the Eel River Bar band has restored Indian status under Bill C-31, and it has an out-marriage rate over fifty per cent.
The legislative objective was to assimilate Indians over time and the best way to do that was through a notional blood quantum formula which, coupled with out-marriage, would result in their legislative extinction.
Her argument that states should accommodate tribal law by considering tribal membership criteria as one of the many ways to determine public Indigeneity is a guise under which to continue the use of blood quantum and will ultimately result in the eventual assimilation of Indigenous peoples via out-marriage.
Duncan and Trejo (2009) suggest that if education is positively related to out-marriage and if children of intermarried parents are less likely to identify with any specific ethnicity, then standard estimates of intergenerational assimilation may be biased downward.
1984) find no relationship between occupational status and out-marriage for Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans in California.
While documentation and discussion of out-marriage rates among heterosexual Jews is widespread, very little similar analysis exists for inter-group partnering patterns of gay Jews.
While the issue of the extent to which gay Jewish men form inter-group partnerships has never been systematically examined, much attention has been devoted to the question of out-marriage rates among Jewish heterosexuals (out-marriage is defined as a Jew who marries a non-Jew who does not convert to Judaism).
Thus, out-marriage (exogamy) poses a very real demographic threat to the survival of Judaism, which in most places in the world is at best a tiny minority of the population.
Rubin said in some respects, out-marriage among American Jews has been a good thing, since it has helped Jews assimilate into mainstream American culture.
142) These, of course, were the same social strata to which the vast majority of Rome's sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Jews belonged--Jews whose lifestyle was typified by a two-generational nuclear family structure, a rapidly expanding out-marriage pattern (between different Jewish immigrant and local ethnic groups), a heavy reliance on "neighborhood" (shekhunah, as they themselves called it) networking rather than on relatives to meet immediate and emergency needs, and, of course, well entrenched women's rights, including over their late husbands' orphans and estates.