outcompete

out·com·pete

 (out′kəm-pēt′)
tr.v. out·com·pet·ed, out·com·pet·ing, out·com·petes
To prevail over or surpass (another) under competitive circumstances.

outcompete

(ˌaʊtkəmˈpiːt)
vb (tr)
to surpass in competition
References in periodicals archive ?
The University's don, Prof Mathews Dida, an agriculturalist, for example has developed a type of maize breed that can outcompete a common weed called striga which often retards the growth of maize.
Korean cable providers are concentrating on developing 220 kilovolt cables and on winning turnkey deals to outcompete foreign companies.
C]omplacency" from big automakers toward electric vehicles will give Tesla a "near-monopolistic opportunity to gain market share and outcompete the incumbent automotive industry," Haissl said in a note to clients.
They then return home to perfect your ideas and outcompete you whilst you remain trapped in your old way of doing things.
He points out that adult Asian carp are too large to have any local predators, that they have a "prolific' reproduction rate, and they can outcompete native species for food.
These invaders can outcompete the producer microbes for nutrients, reducing yield and productivity.
As you try to mould larger and larger pieces, the environmental condition that fungus wants to grow in is the same thing that favours microorganisms like bacteria that will outcompete the mushroom spores," he says.
It creates a thick "wall" of vegetation that is very hard to penetrate, and can outcompete native plants used by fish and invertebrates (animals without spinal columns like crayfish and insects).
Although achieving moderate densities at some sites, researchers have concluded that this carnivore is not a threat to our aquatic systems and is unlikely to outcompete native plants.
Grey squirrels outcompete the reds for resources and carry a squirrelpox disease that is fatal to the native species.
They are outspending us today to outcompete us tomorrow," he warned.