outermost


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Related to outermost: innermost

out·er·most

 (ou′tər-mōst′)
adj.
Most distant from the center or inside; outmost.

outermost

(ˈaʊtəˌməʊst)
adj
furthest from the centre or middle; outmost

out•er•most

(ˈaʊ tərˌmoʊst)

adj.
farthest out.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.outermost - situated at the farthest possible point from a center
outer - being on the outside or further from a center; "spent hours adorning the outer man"; "the outer suburbs"

outermost

adjective
Most distant or remote, as from a center:
Translations
الأكْثَرُ بُعْداً
yderst
ulommainen
legkülsõ
ystur
najvzdialenejší
en dışarda olanen dışta

outermost

[ˈaʊtəməʊst] ADJ [place] → más extremo, más remoto; [cover, layer] → más externo, más exterior

outermost

[ˈaʊtərməʊst] adjle plus éloigné or la plus éloignée
Pluto, the outermost known planet → Pluton, la plus éloignée des planètes connues.outer space nespace m

outermost

adjäußerste(r, s)

outermost

[ˈaʊtəˌməʊst] adjestremo/a, più lontano/a

out

(aut)
1. adverb, adjective not in a building etc; from inside a building etc; in(to) the open air. The children are out in the garden; They went out for a walk.
2. adverb from inside (something). He opened the desk and took out a pencil.
3. adverb, adjective away from home, an office etc. We had an evening out; The manager is out.
4. adverb, adjective far away. The ship was out at sea; He went out to India.
5. adverb loudly and clearly. He shouted out the answer.
6. adverb completely. She was tired out.
7. adverb, adjective not correct. My calculations seem to be out.
8. adverb, adjective free, known, available etc. He let the cat out; The secret is out.
9. adverb, adjective (in games) having been defeated. The batsman was (caught) out.
10. adverb, adjective on strike. The men came out in protest.
11. adverb, adjective no longer in fashion. Long hair is definitely out.
12. adverb, adjective (of the tide) with the water at or going to its lowest level. The tide is (going) out.
13. adjective unacceptable. That suggestion is definitely out.
(as part of a word)
1. not inside or near, as in out-lying.
2. indicating outward movement, as in outburst.
3. indicating that the action goes further or beyond a normal action, as in outshine.
ˈouter adjective
outside; far from (the centre of) something. outer space.
ˈoutermost adjective
nearest the edge, outside etc. the outermost ring on the target.
ˈouting noun
a usually short trip, made for pleasure. an outing to the seaside.
ˈoutward adjective
1. on or towards the outside; able to be seen. Judging by his outward appearance, he's not very rich; no outward sign of unhappiness.
2. (of a journey) away from. The outward journey will be by sea, but they will return home by air.
ˈoutwardly adverb
in appearance. Outwardly he is cheerful, but he is really a very unhappy person.
ˈoutwards adverb
towards the outside edge or surface. Moving outwards from the centre of the painting, we see that the figures become smaller.
ˈout-and-out adjective
very bad. an out-and-out liar.
out-of-datedateout-of-pocket adjective
paid in cash; paid out of your own pocket. out-of-pocket expenses.
be out of pocket
to have no money; to lose money. I can't pay you now as I'm out of pocket at the moment.
out of printprintout of sight
1. no longer visible; where you cannot see something or be seen. They watched the ship sailing until it was out of sight; Put it out of sight.
2. an old expression meaning wonderful, fantastic. The show was out of sight.
out of sight, out of mind
an expression describing a situation in which someone is forgotten when he/she is not around. They used to be close friends, but since he left it has become a case of out of sight, out of mind.
ˌout-of-the-ˈway adjective
difficult to reach or arrive at. an out-of-the-way place.
be out for
to be wanting or intending to get. She is out for revenge.
be out to
to be determined to. He is out to win the race.
out of
1. from inside. He took it out of the bag.
2. not in. Mr Smith is out of the office; out of danger; out of sight.
3. from among. Four out of five people like this song.
4. having none left. She is quite out of breath.
5. because of. He did it out of curiosity/spite.
6. from. He drank the lemonade straight out of the bottle.
out of doors
outside. We like to eat out of doors in summer.
out of it
1. not part of a group, activity etc. I felt a bit out of it at the party.
2. no longer involved in something. That was a crazy scheme – I'm glad to be out of it.
out of orderorderout of the way
unusual. There was nothing out of the way about what she said.
out of this worldworldout of workwork
References in classic literature ?
He tried the door, which yielded to his hand, and was flung wide open by a sudden gust of wind that passed, as with a loud sigh, from the outermost portal through all the passages and apartments of the new house.
Now, however preposterous it may at first seem to talk of any creature's skin as being of that sort of consistence and thickness, yet in point of fact these are no arguments against such a presumption; because you cannot raise any other dense enveloping layer from the whale's body but that same blubber; and the outermost enveloping layer of any animal, if reasonably dense, what can that be but the skin?
She wandered to the outermost boundary of the flower-garden, and then returned by another path, which led back, past the side of an ornamental summer-house commanding a view over the fields from a corner of the lawn.
In the outermost room were half a dozen exceptional people who had had, for a few years, some vague misgiving in them that things in general were going rather wrong.
Jem Rodney was the outermost man, and sat conveniently near Marner's standing-place; but he declined to give his services.
They have likewise discovered two lesser stars, or satellites, which revolve about Mars; whereof the innermost is distant from the centre of the primary planet exactly three of his diameters, and the outermost, five; the former revolves in the space of ten hours, and the latter in twenty-one and a half; so that the squares of their periodical times are very near in the same proportion with the cubes of their distance from the centre of Mars; which evidently shows them to be governed by the same law of gravitation that influences the other heavenly bodies.
They almost forgot to go to their dinner that day, their appetites being preoccupied with imaginary sugar-plums; and I think even Punch, setting up his tabernacle in the market- place, would not have succeeded in drawing them away from those shop-windows, where they stood according to gradations of size and strength, the biggest and strongest being nearest the window, and the little ones in the outermost rows lifting wide-open eyes and mouths towards the upper tier of jars, like small birds at meal- time.
It struck the sevenfold shield in its outermost layer--the eighth, which was of bronze--and went through six of the layers but in the seventh hide it stayed.
Shirking and sharking in all their many varieties have been sown broadcast by the ill-fated cause; and even those who have contemplated its history from the outermost circle of such evil have been insensibly tempted into a loose way of letting bad things alone to take their own bad course, and a loose belief that if the world go wrong it was in some off-hand manner never meant to go right.
A man was standing at the door of one of the outermost houses on my right hand, looking at me.
The first and outermost whorl has the rim broadest, and the seven inner whorls are narrower, in the following proportions-- the sixth is next to the first in size, the fourth next to the sixth; then comes the eighth; the seventh is fifth, the fifth is sixth, the third is seventh, last and eighth comes the second.
His small stature was no hindrance to him--here he could see over the heads of the ladies who were seated near the outermost part of the bench.