outhouse

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out·house

 (out′hous′)
n.
1. A small, enclosed structure having one or two holes in a seat built over a pit and serving as an outdoor toilet.
2. An outbuilding, as on a farm.

outhouse

(ˈaʊtˌhaʊs)
n
1. (Architecture) a building near to, but separate from, a main building; outbuilding
2. US an outside lavatory

out•house

(ˈaʊtˌhaʊs)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)
1. an outbuilding serving as a toilet; privy.
2. any outbuilding.
[1525–35]

outhouse

A small building detached from a house, such as a garden shed or sometimes a toilet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.outhouse - a small outbuilding with a bench having holes through which a user can defecateouthouse - a small outbuilding with a bench having holes through which a user can defecate
outbuilding - a building that is subordinate to and separate from a main building
Translations

outhouse

[ˈaʊthaʊs] N (outhouses (pl)) [ˈaʊthaʊzɪz]
1. (Brit) = outbuilding
2. (US) (= toilet) → retrete m fuera de la casa

outhouse

[ˈaʊthaʊs] n (= shed) → appentis m, remise f
References in classic literature ?
It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, which the Farmer, Death, had already set apart to be his tumbrils of the Revolution.
In the District of Minas alone, there were destroyed two hundred and fifty-five houses, two hundred and seventy-six barns, one hundred and fifty-five outhouses, eleven mills, and one church; and the friends of those who refused to surrender were threatened as the victims of their obstinacy.
He had no theories about setting the world to rights, but he saw there was a great deal of damage done by building with ill-seasoned timber--by ignorant men in fine clothes making plans for outhouses and workshops and the like without knowing the bearings of things--by slovenly joiners' work, and by hasty contracts that could never be fulfilled without ruining somebody; and he resolved, for his part, to set his face against such doings.
The homestead consisted of a threshing floor, outhouses, stables, a bathhouse, a lodge, and a large brick house with semicircular facade still in course of construction.
A giant Negro lifted her to the pommel of his saddle, and while the raiders searched the bungalow and outhouses for plunder he rode with her beyond the gates and waited the coming of his master.
With its barn and outhouses it snuggled into a nook in the hillside, which protected it from west and north.
At the right-hand side, on entering by the front-door, there was a kitchen, with its outhouses attached.
There were great stables, where a dozen grooms and boys held forth, rows of vine-clad servants' cottages, an endless and orderly array of outhouses, long grape arbors, green pastures, orchards, and berry patches.
He talked the matter over with his father one evening when the rays of the setting sun entering the yard between the outhouses ruled the heavy shadows with luminous streaks.
He broke into outhouses with an axe he managed to purloin in a wood-cutters' camp.
The barns and outhouses are mouldering away; the sheds are patched and half roofless; the log cabins (built in Virginia with external chimneys made of clay or wood) are squalid in the last degree.
Some slept in the stable and outhouses, some in the common room, some two or three in beds.