outpoll

out·poll

 (out-pōl′)
tr.v. out·polled, out·poll·ing, out·polls
To win more votes than: She outpolled her rival by a wide margin.

outpoll

(ˌaʊtˈpəʊl)
vb (tr)
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to win more votes than
References in periodicals archive ?
But no-one expected them at this election to outpoll the SDLP.
Senator, as stipulated under state law, should her late husband outpoll incumbent-Sen.
Critics fear the Brotherhood and NDP will easily outpoll the dozens of political groups born out of the anti-Mubarak uprising, dividing power between former regime loyalists and supporters of a fundamentalist state.
The opinion polls tell a grim story, and real elections have turned out even worse - the Conservatives managed to outpoll them in Wales in June, and the prospects for the Norwich North by-election (the votes are counted today) are no better.
This structural edge can be seen by looking at how Democrat Al Gore's roughly 540,000-vote advantage in the national popular vote in 2000 dissipates when the votes are tallied by congressional district: In only 195 districts (as currently configured) does Gore outpoll George W.
Imagine the message that would sent to Gordon Brown if Conservatives outpoll Labour in Wales," Ms Gillan said.
Representative Barbara Mikulski's victory in the Senate contest in Maryland and Bella Abzug's narrow win in a suburban New York Congressional primary showed that tough, smart women can outpoll cool, well-connected men in a race blessed with several highly qualified candidates.
And his cultured style in polishing off his cone meant he'd certainly outpoll little Hugh Guy, two, in the etiquette stakes.
He would defeat Republican Ron Saxton, 47 percent to 33 percent, and he would outpoll Republican Jason Atkinson, 48 percent to 36 percent.
Still, no other development has complicated Cruz's efforts to win over the faithful as much as the rise of Trump, who consistently outpolls Cruz among evangelicals despite a long list of actions, positions and statements seemingly out of step with the Christian faith.
That's in spite of the fact that Cameron still outpolls Labour leader Ed Miliband on personal approval and economic management, according to the survey commissioned by Conservative upper-house lawmaker Michael Ashcroft.
Obama outpolls former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty by 19 points and Palin by 23 points.