outrage


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out·rage

 (out′rāj′)
n.
1. An act of extreme violence or viciousness: outrages committed by the dictatorship.
2. Something that is grossly offensive to decency, morality, or good taste: viewed the film as an outrage to common decency.
3. Resentful anger aroused by a violent or offensive act, or an instance of this: The incident sparked a public outrage.
tr.v. out·raged, out·rag·ing, out·rag·es
1. To offend grossly against (standards of decency or morality); commit an outrage on.
2. To produce anger or resentment in: was outraged that he was lied to. See Synonyms at offend.

[Middle English, from Old French, from outre, beyond; see outré.]

outrage

(ˈaʊtˌreɪdʒ)
n
1. a wantonly vicious or cruel act
2. a gross violation of decency, morality, honour, etc
3. profound indignation, anger, or hurt, caused by such an act
vb (tr)
4. to cause profound indignation, anger, or resentment in
5. to offend grossly (feelings, decency, human dignity, etc)
6. to commit an act of wanton viciousness, cruelty, or indecency on
7. a euphemistic word for rape1
[C13 (meaning: excess): via French from outré beyond, from Latin ultrā]

out•rage

(ˈaʊt reɪdʒ)

n., v. -raged, -rag•ing. n.
1. an act of wanton cruelty or violence.
2. anything that strongly offends or affronts the feelings.
3. a powerful feeling of resentment or anger aroused by an injury, insult, or injustice.
v.t.
4. to subject to grievous violence or indignity.
5. to anger or offend; shock.
6. to offend against (right, decency, feelings, etc.) grossly or shamelessly.
[1250–1300; < Old French outrage, ultrage=outr(er) to push beyond bounds (derivative of outre beyond < Latin ultrā) + -age -age]

outrage

- The true etymology of outrage has nothing to do with out or rage—rather, it is a borrowing from French outrage, "insult, outrage," based on Latin ultra, "beyond," and -agium, a noun suffix; outrage first meant "lack of moderation."
See also related terms for insult.

outrage


Past participle: outraged
Gerund: outraging

Imperative
outrage
outrage
Present
I outrage
you outrage
he/she/it outrages
we outrage
you outrage
they outrage
Preterite
I outraged
you outraged
he/she/it outraged
we outraged
you outraged
they outraged
Present Continuous
I am outraging
you are outraging
he/she/it is outraging
we are outraging
you are outraging
they are outraging
Present Perfect
I have outraged
you have outraged
he/she/it has outraged
we have outraged
you have outraged
they have outraged
Past Continuous
I was outraging
you were outraging
he/she/it was outraging
we were outraging
you were outraging
they were outraging
Past Perfect
I had outraged
you had outraged
he/she/it had outraged
we had outraged
you had outraged
they had outraged
Future
I will outrage
you will outrage
he/she/it will outrage
we will outrage
you will outrage
they will outrage
Future Perfect
I will have outraged
you will have outraged
he/she/it will have outraged
we will have outraged
you will have outraged
they will have outraged
Future Continuous
I will be outraging
you will be outraging
he/she/it will be outraging
we will be outraging
you will be outraging
they will be outraging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been outraging
you have been outraging
he/she/it has been outraging
we have been outraging
you have been outraging
they have been outraging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been outraging
you will have been outraging
he/she/it will have been outraging
we will have been outraging
you will have been outraging
they will have been outraging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been outraging
you had been outraging
he/she/it had been outraging
we had been outraging
you had been outraging
they had been outraging
Conditional
I would outrage
you would outrage
he/she/it would outrage
we would outrage
you would outrage
they would outrage
Past Conditional
I would have outraged
you would have outraged
he/she/it would have outraged
we would have outraged
you would have outraged
they would have outraged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.outrage - a feeling of righteous anger
anger, ire, choler - a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance
dudgeon, high dudgeon - a feeling of intense indignation (now used only in the phrase `in high dudgeon')
2.outrage - a wantonly cruel act
atrocity, inhumanity - an act of atrocious cruelty
3.outrage - a disgraceful event
trouble - an event causing distress or pain; "what is the trouble?"; "heart trouble"
skeleton in the closet, skeleton in the cupboard, skeleton - a scandal that is kept secret; "there must be a skeleton somewhere in that family's closet"
4.outrage - the act of scandalizing
affront, insult - a deliberately offensive act or something producing the effect of deliberate disrespect; "turning his back on me was a deliberate insult"
Verb1.outrage - strike with disgust or revulsionoutrage - strike with disgust or revulsion; "The scandalous behavior of this married woman shocked her friends"
churn up, sicken, disgust, nauseate, revolt - cause aversion in; offend the moral sense of; "The pornographic pictures sickened us"
2.outrage - violate the sacred character of a place or language; "desecrate a cemetery"; "violate the sanctity of the church"; "profane the name of God"
assail, assault, set on, attack - attack someone physically or emotionally; "The mugger assaulted the woman"; "Nightmares assailed him regularly"
3.outrage - force (someone) to have sex against their will; "The woman was raped on her way home at night"
assail, assault, set on, attack - attack someone physically or emotionally; "The mugger assaulted the woman"; "Nightmares assailed him regularly"
gang-rape - rape (someone) successively with several attackers; "The prisoner was gang-raped"

outrage

verb
1. offend, shock, upset, pain, wound, provoke, insult, infuriate, incense, gall, madden, vex, affront, displease, rile, scandalize, give offence, nark (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. slang), cut to the quick, make your blood boil, piss you off (taboo slang), put (someone's) nose out of joint, put (someone's) back up, disgruntle Many people have been outraged by these comments.
noun
1. indignation, shock, anger, rage, fury, hurt, resentment, scorn, wrath, ire (literary), exasperation, umbrage, righteous anger The decision has provoked outrage from human rights groups.
2. atrocity, crime, horror, evil, cruelty, brutality, enormity, barbarism, inhumanity, abomination, barbarity, villainy, act of cruelty The terrorists' latest outrage is a bomb attack on a busy station.

outrage

noun
1. A monstrous offense or evil:
2. Something that offends one's sense of propriety, fairness, or justice:
3. An act that offends a person's sense of pride or dignity:
verb
1. To cause resentment or hurt by callous, rude behavior:
Idioms: add insult to injury, give offense to.
2. To do a wrong to; treat unjustly:
Translations
عَمَلٌ جائِر، إساءَه، إهانَهيُهين، يُسيء إلى، يُؤْذي
chokeresåreskandaleuhyrlighed
durván megsérterõszakos cselekmény
ofbeldisverksvívirîa
pasipiktinimą keliantis dalykassmurto veiksmasšokiruoti
lietot vardarbīburupji apvainotsmags pārkāpumsvardarbība
násilnosťpobúrenierozhorčiť sa
müthiş öfkelendirmekrezaletvahşet

outrage

[aʊtˈreɪdʒ]
A. N
1. (= wicked, violent act) → atrocidad f
bomb outrageatentado m (con bomba)
2. (= indecency) → ultraje m, escándalo m; (= injustice) → atropello m, agravio m
a public outrageun escándalo público
an outrage against good tasteun atentado al buen gusto
it's an outrage!¡es un escándalo!, ¡qué barbaridad!
to commit an outrage against or on sb [terrorists] → cometer un atentado contra algn
B. VT [+ person] → ultrajar; [+ standards, decency] → atentar contra
it outrages justicees un atentado a la justicia
to be outraged by sthindignarse ante algo

outrage

[ˈaʊtreɪdʒ]
n
(= attack) → acte m de violence
an outrage against sth [+ standards, values] → un outrage à qch
(= bombing) → attentat m
(= anger) → indignation f
outrage against sb/sth → indignation contre qn/qch
(= scandal) → scandale m
vtindigner, scandaliser
to be outraged by sth → être indigné par qch
They were outraged by the news of his release → Ils furent indignés par la nouvelle de sa libération.

outrage

n
(= wicked, violent deed)Untat f; (cruel) → Gräueltat f; (by police, demonstrators etc) → Ausschreitung f; bomb outrageverbrecherischer Bombenanschlag; an outrage against the Stateein schändliches or ruchloses (liter)Verbrechen gegen den Staat
(= indecency, injustice)Skandal m; it’s an outrage to waste foodes ist ein Skandal or Frevel, Essen verkommen zu lassen; an outrage against humanityein Verbrechen ntgegen die Menschlichkeit; an outrage to common decencyeine empörende Verletzung des allgemeinen Anstandsgefühls; an outrage against public moralityein empörender Verstoß gegen die guten Sitten or die öffentliche Moral
(= sense of outrage)Empörung f (→ at über +acc), → Entrüstung f (→ at über +acc); he reacted with (a sense of) outrageer war empört or entrüstet
vt morals, conventionsins Gesicht schlagen (+dat), → Hohn sprechen (+dat), → hohnsprechen (+dat) (geh); sense of decencybeleidigen; idealsmit Füßen treten; personempören, entrüsten; public opinion was outraged by this cruelty/injusticedie öffentliche Meinung war über diese Grausamkeit/Ungerechtigkeit empört; he deliberately set out to outrage his criticser hatte es darauf angelegt, seine Kritiker zu schockieren

outrage

[ˈaʊtˌreɪdʒ]
1. n (wicked, violent deed) → atrocità f inv; (emotion) → sdegno
bomb outrage → attentato dinamitardo
it caused a public outrage → ha provocato uno scandalo
an outrage against good taste → un oltraggio al buon gusto
an outrage against humanity → un crimine contro l'umanità
it's an outrage! → è una vergogna!
2. vtoffendere
to be outraged by sth → essere scandalizzato/a da qc

outrage

(ˈautreidʒ) noun
a wicked act, especially of great violence. the outrages committed by the soldiers; The decision to close the road is a public outrage.
verb
to hurt, shock or insult. She was outraged by his behaviour.
outˈrageous adjective
noticeably terrible. an outrageous hat; outrageous behaviour.
outˈrageously adverb
outˈrageousness noun
References in classic literature ?
Such an outrage combines the greatest possible regard for humanity with the most alarming display of ferocious imbecility.
When he was come to Chios, be outraged Merope, the daughter of Oenopion, being drunken; but Oenopion when he learned of it was greatly vexed at the outrage and blinded him and cast him out of the country.
Lavalle, descend and make reparation for outrage of domicile.
I think I never hated slavery so intensely as at that moment; certainly, my perception of the enormous outrage which is in- flicted by it, on the godlike nature of its victims, was rendered far more clear than ever.
On the previous Friday, two gentlemen--occupying widely-different positions in society-- had been the victims of an outrage which had startled all London.
But here was a man who sincerely did not mind what people thought of him, and so convention had no hold on him; he was like a wrestler whose body is oiled; you could not get a grip on him; it gave him a freedom which was an outrage.
Blanche left Arnold to array herself in her bridal splendor--after another outrage on propriety, and more consequences of free institutions.
This time the sting struck deep; the outrage was beyond endurance.
The source of the outrage was, it need hardly be said, that infamous society which has held this community in bondage for so long a period, and against which the Herald has taken so uncompromising a stand.
Crooks and M'Lellan, at this mortifying check to their gainful enterprise, was the information that a rival trader was at the bottom of it; the Sioux, it is said, having been instigated to this outrage by Mr.
The encouragers of the first mob never intended matters should go this length, and the people in general expressed the utter detestation of this unparalleled outrage, and I wish they could be convinced what infinite hazard there is of the most terrible consequences from such demons, when they are let loose in a government where there is not constant authority at hand sufficient to suppress them.
How liable would she become not only to their contempt but to their outrage, and how soon would dear-bought experience proclaim that when a people or family so divide, it never fails to be against themselves.