outrush

outrush

(ˈaʊtˌrʌʃ)
n
a flowing or rushing out
Translations
References in classic literature ?
There could have been no more complete answer than that silence, and Lydgate, forgetting everything else, completely mastered by the outrush of tenderness at the sudden belief that this sweet young creature depended on him for her joy, actually put his arms round her, folding her gently and protectingly-- he was used to being gentle with the weak and suffering--and kissed each of the two large tears.
But when he took her in his arms at the door and kissed her good night in tender lover-fashion, she forgot everything in the outrush of her own love to him.
An initial outrush of fluid and flash boiling gas into the sac volume (which was evacuated of fluid after the prior injection)-corresponded to the initial flow overshoot due to the high delta pressure gradient across the sealing band; this would be accompanied by the displacement of gas out of the sac volume;
Thursday night the panic outrush for the country began.
This is an outrush for Kyrgyzstan given that last year Kyrgyzstan was ranked 80th.
Meantime, Wordsworth, in the Alps, noticed the "stationary blasts of waterfalls," while in later years, Gerard Manley Hopkins wrote of similar views describing the great outrush of water as resembling "foam bags".
Recall that, in Judeo-Christian theology, the universe was created by the speech of God (the outrush of air in verbal form) and that Adam was created by God's breathing into clay.
An interesting thought in this context is that if, under these circumstances, all exchange controls were lifted and the yuan were cut loose from its exchange rate moorings, this could unleash such an outrush of funds that the renminbi would plummet in the markets, rather than rise.
April 6: A sudden outrush of lethal methane gas at anthracite mine Cynheidre, near Llanelli, kills six men and injures 69.
so Hector steered the course of his outrush straight for a vessel
She realizes that "such a situation can be saved only by an immediate outrush of feeling; and on Selden's side the determining impulse was still lacking" (323).
But upon imagining a vision of Margaret's face, his attitude changes: "Then slowly and softly, like a gentle outrush of breath, my hatred of the Negroes diminishes, dies, replaced by a kind of wild, desperate love for them, and my eyes are wet with tears" (84).