outwards


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out·ward

 (out′wərd)
adj.
1. Of, located on, or moving toward the outside or exterior; outer.
2. Relating to the physical self: a concern with outward beauty rather than with inward reflections.
3. Purely external; superficial: outward composure.
adv. also out·wards (-wərdz)
Toward the outside; away from a central point.

[Middle English, from Old English ūtweard : ūt, out; see out + -weard, -ward.]

out′ward·ness n.

outwards

(ˈaʊtwədz) or

outward

adv
towards the outside; out
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.outwards - toward the outside; "move the needle further outward!"
Translations
نَحْو الخارِج
udefter
kifelé
út
smerom von
dışa doğrudışına doğru

outwards

[ˈaʊtwərdz] outward [ˈaʊtwərd] adv
[move, spread, open] → vers l'extérieur
The top door opened outwards → La porte du haut ouvrait vers l'extérieur
(= beyond oneself) to look outwards → s'ouvrir vers l'extérieur

outwards

advnach außen; the journey outwardsdie Hinreise

outwards

outward [ˈaʊtwəd(z)] advverso l'esterno
outward bound → in partenza

out

(aut)
1. adverb, adjective not in a building etc; from inside a building etc; in(to) the open air. The children are out in the garden; They went out for a walk.
2. adverb from inside (something). He opened the desk and took out a pencil.
3. adverb, adjective away from home, an office etc. We had an evening out; The manager is out.
4. adverb, adjective far away. The ship was out at sea; He went out to India.
5. adverb loudly and clearly. He shouted out the answer.
6. adverb completely. She was tired out.
7. adverb, adjective not correct. My calculations seem to be out.
8. adverb, adjective free, known, available etc. He let the cat out; The secret is out.
9. adverb, adjective (in games) having been defeated. The batsman was (caught) out.
10. adverb, adjective on strike. The men came out in protest.
11. adverb, adjective no longer in fashion. Long hair is definitely out.
12. adverb, adjective (of the tide) with the water at or going to its lowest level. The tide is (going) out.
13. adjective unacceptable. That suggestion is definitely out.
(as part of a word)
1. not inside or near, as in out-lying.
2. indicating outward movement, as in outburst.
3. indicating that the action goes further or beyond a normal action, as in outshine.
ˈouter adjective
outside; far from (the centre of) something. outer space.
ˈoutermost adjective
nearest the edge, outside etc. the outermost ring on the target.
ˈouting noun
a usually short trip, made for pleasure. an outing to the seaside.
ˈoutward adjective
1. on or towards the outside; able to be seen. Judging by his outward appearance, he's not very rich; no outward sign of unhappiness.
2. (of a journey) away from. The outward journey will be by sea, but they will return home by air.
ˈoutwardly adverb
in appearance. Outwardly he is cheerful, but he is really a very unhappy person.
ˈoutwards adverb
towards the outside edge or surface. Moving outwards from the centre of the painting, we see that the figures become smaller.
ˈout-and-out adjective
very bad. an out-and-out liar.
out-of-datedateout-of-pocket adjective
paid in cash; paid out of your own pocket. out-of-pocket expenses.
be out of pocket
to have no money; to lose money. I can't pay you now as I'm out of pocket at the moment.
out of printprintout of sight
1. no longer visible; where you cannot see something or be seen. They watched the ship sailing until it was out of sight; Put it out of sight.
2. an old expression meaning wonderful, fantastic. The show was out of sight.
out of sight, out of mind
an expression describing a situation in which someone is forgotten when he/she is not around. They used to be close friends, but since he left it has become a case of out of sight, out of mind.
ˌout-of-the-ˈway adjective
difficult to reach or arrive at. an out-of-the-way place.
be out for
to be wanting or intending to get. She is out for revenge.
be out to
to be determined to. He is out to win the race.
out of
1. from inside. He took it out of the bag.
2. not in. Mr Smith is out of the office; out of danger; out of sight.
3. from among. Four out of five people like this song.
4. having none left. She is quite out of breath.
5. because of. He did it out of curiosity/spite.
6. from. He drank the lemonade straight out of the bottle.
out of doors
outside. We like to eat out of doors in summer.
out of it
1. not part of a group, activity etc. I felt a bit out of it at the party.
2. no longer involved in something. That was a crazy scheme – I'm glad to be out of it.
out of orderorderout of the way
unusual. There was nothing out of the way about what she said.
out of this worldworldout of workwork
References in classic literature ?
Lorry opened his hands, and extended them outwards with an argumentative smile.
No vair or ermine decked this garment; but in respect of his age, the Grand Master, as permitted by the rules, wore his doublet lined and trimmed with the softest lambskin, dressed with the wool outwards, which was the nearest approach he could regularly make to the use of fur, then the greatest luxury of dress.
As it so happened there was not a window in the whole inn that looked outwards except a hole in the wall of a straw-loft through which they used to throw out the straw.
The harbour lies below me, with, on the far side, one long granite wall stretching out into the sea, with a curve outwards at the end of it, in the middle of which is a lighthouse.
The latter is a very large, bright, clean, cheerful apartment with three windows in it, and a partition-wall which, running outwards from the front wall, makes a sort of little den, a sort of extra room, for myself.
was the skull nailed to the limb with the face outwards, or with the face to the limb?
They have thwart pieces from side to side about three inches thick, and their gunwales flare outwards, so as to cast off the surges of the waves.
Directly I appeared Dona Rita, away there on the couch, passed the tips of her fingers over her eyes and holding her hands up palms outwards on each side of her head, shouted to me down the whole length of the room: "The dry season has set in.
The crags above us were not merely perpendicular, but curved outwards at the top, so that ascent was out of the question.
The other features of luxury, a few flowers, a few coloured cushions, a few scraps of stage costume, were multiplied by all the mirrors into the madness of the Arabian Nights, and danced and changed places perpetually as the shuffling attendant shifted a mirror outwards or shot one back against the wall.
Set in these wrinkles was a sunken slit, that represented the mouth, beneath which the chin curved outwards to a point.
Little by little, the tide of houses, always thrust from the heart of the city outwards, overflows, devours, wears away, and effaces this wall.