overblown


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Related to overblown: overdone, mutually, entreat

o·ver·blown 1

 (ō′vər-blōn′)
v.
Past participle of overblow.
adj.
1. Excessive, exaggerated, or overdone: overblown decorations; overblown threats.
2. Full of empty or pretentious language; bombastic: overblown oratory.

[Adj., from over- + blown, past participle of blow.]

o·ver·blown 2

 (ō′vər-blōn′)
adj.
Past the stage of full bloom: overblown roses.

[over- + blown, past participle of blow.]

overblown

(ˌəʊvəˈbləʊn)
adj
1. overdone or excessive
2. bombastic; turgid: overblown prose.
3. (of flowers, such as the rose) past the stage of full bloom

o•ver•blown1

(ˈoʊ vərˈbloʊn)

adj.
1. overdone or excessive: overblown praise.
2. of unusually large size or proportions.
3. overinflated; turgid; bombastic; pretentious.
[1590–1600]

o•ver•blown2

(ˈoʊ vərˈbloʊn)

adj.
past the stage of full bloom.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.overblown - puffed up with vanity; "a grandiloquent and boastful manner"; "overblown oratory"; "a pompous speech"; "pseudo-scientific gobbledygook and pontifical hooey"- Newsweek
pretentious - making claim to or creating an appearance of (often undeserved) importance or distinction; "a pretentious country house"; "a pretentious fraud"; "a pretentious scholarly edition"
2.overblown - past the stage of full bloom; "overblown roses"
mature - having reached full natural growth or development; "a mature cell"

overblown

adjective
1. excessive, exaggerated, over the top (slang), too much, inflated, extravagant, overdone, disproportionate, undue, fulsome, intemperate, immoderate, O.T.T. (slang) The reporting of the story was fair, though a little overblown.
2. inflated, rhetorical, high-flown, pompous, pretentious, flowery, florid, turgid, bombastic, windy, grandiloquent, high-sounding, fustian, orotund, magniloquent, aureate, euphuistic The book contains a heavy dose of overblown lyrical description.

overblown

adjective
1. Characterized by language that is elevated and sometimes pompous in style:
2. Filled up with or as if with something insubstantial:
3. Having too much flesh:
Translations

overblown

[ˌəʊvəˈbləʊn] ADJ
1. [flower] → marchito, pasado
2. [style] → pomposo, pretencioso

overblown

[ˌəʊvərˈbləʊn] adj (= exaggerated) → exagéré(e)
References in classic literature ?
The Mercuries, exhausted by looking out of window, are reposing in the hall and hang their heavy heads, the gorgeous creatures, like overblown sunflowers.
He looked like an overblown schoolboy, and though I felt so sorry for him, I could hardly help laughing.
He had most of Horace by heart, and had got into the habit of connecting this particular walk with certain odes which he repeated duly, at the same time noting the condition of his flowers, and stooping now and again to pick any that were withered or overblown.
He met new groups of his countrymen, who had all a straggling air of having at one time overblown themselves, like certain uncomfortable kinds of flowers, and of being now mere weeds.
NEW Englanders hit by a blizzard packing knee-high snowfall and hurricane-force winds have begun digging themselves out - as some New Yorkers and others spared its full fury questioned whether forecasts were overblown.
New eNglaNders | hit by a blizzard packing knee-high snowfall and hurricane-force winds have begun digging themselves out - as some New Yorkers and others spared its full fury questioned whether forecasts were overblown.
9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Attorneys for Internet entrepreneur Gurbaksh Chahal said they will vigorously fight overblown and misleading charges of domestic abuse that are expected to be filed today by the District Attorney's Office in San Francisco Superior Court.
The story is totally overblown and overplayed as far as the reality of the scenario," said Sheen.
While the concern was very real, the panic proved to be overblown.
The manner in which some architects choose to describe their work is at times obscure, sometimes overblown, and often extremely baffling.
But it is part of a growing sense that irrational media coverage--including articles trumpeting overblown fears of a clampdown on civil liberties--has crippled our ability to effectively use the military and police.