overconcern

overconcern

(ˌəʊvəkənˈsɜːn)
vb (tr)
to concern excessively
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References in periodicals archive ?
Paradoxically, an overconcern for morality has its own downside in the form of moral zealotry.
1999) were used to assess body image: appearance appraisal (AA, three items), the degree to which students were bothered by body changes (BC, two items), overconcern with weight and shape (OWS, five items), and weight-related teasing from peers and adults (WT-P, eight items, and WT-A, three items, respectively).
The Valukas team could find no evidence that any sort of cost-benefit analysis or overconcern with costs entered into the resolution of safety issues.
Body-checking is a behavioral manifestation of body dissatisfaction and overconcern with shape and weight (11) and includes any behavior oriented to verify the body appearance and physical state held constant by means of weighing, measuring body parts (i.
of habitability, including overconcern on the part of judges with
In eating pathology, schemas reflect an overconcern with food, weight, and/or shape (Cooper and Fairburn 1992).
Dreyfuss, supra note 8, at 795-96 (noting that Federal Circuit jurisprudence displays an overconcern for precision at the expense of accuracy); Rai, supra note 7, at 1115 (noting that "there can be no serious dispute that the Federal Circuit's jurisprudence is formalist in its orientation"); Thomas, supra note 226, at 774 (noting that the Federal Circuit patent jurisprudence "runs a common thread: the drift toward simple rules").
This overconcern, however, was unrelated to any fear of appearing foolish in front of their teacher and their peers.
Psychological indicators of a potential eating disorder can include overconcern with body shape or weight and a need for constant reassurance of appearance, perfectionism, concern with pleasing others, rigidity related to food or body image, social withdrawal including isolation from family and friends, depressed mood, mood swings and/or irritability, high anxiety, obsessiveness, and decreased concentration (ANAD, 2005; Rogers & Petrie, 2001; Seligman, 1998).
Anxiety is defined as a neurosis characterized by excessive worry and overconcern.
Her tendency to overconcern and her having to take on too much responsibility as a teenager suggested Calcarea.
Associated features included overconcern with body image and self-esteem, as well as intermittent depression.