overcontrol

overcontrol

(ˌəʊvəkənˈtrəʊl)
vb (tr)
to control excessively
References in periodicals archive ?
This model has been empirically validated by Affrunti and Ginsburg (2012), who found that children's perceived competence completely mediated the relationship between maternal overcontrol and the children's anxiety symptoms.
That means that SP will never be reached and overcontrol may present, hence integral action may be added.
They attempted to overcontrol their children's eating and physical activities, which became a major source of conflict, particularly at mealtimes, and adversely affected family dynamics.
Other possible explanations for weak associations could be overcontrol for factors that predict indoor endotoxin levels, including poverty and education, the lack of indoor or personal data, which are more strongly related to inflammation (Thorne et al.
Parents get drawn into the cycle of anxiety--they overprotect and overcontrol," which again puts the child behind in development, because while parental behavior may minimize anxiety in the short term, it solidifies it in the long term.
Parents get drawn into the cycle of anxiety --they overprotect and overcontrol," which again puts the child behind in development, because while parental behavior may minimize anxiety in the short term, it solidifies it in the long term.
In some settings, discipline looks like overcontrol with too much emphasis on rigid rules, which can lead teachers to be inflexible and unresponsive to student needs.
This could lead to risk adverseness and a tendency to overcontrol and centralize decisionmaking when we may need to do just the opposite.
A Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) that included the dimensions of positive environment, negative climate, teacher sensitivity, and overcontrol was used as the assessment tool.
It was this sense of overcontrol that led to increased behavior problems in the child (Carlton-Ford et al.