overfunding


Also found in: Financial.

overfunding

(ˈəʊvəˌfʌndɪŋ)
n
(Economics) (in Britain) a government policy in which it sells more of its securities than would be required to finance public spending, with the object of absorbing surplus funds to curb inflation
References in periodicals archive ?
Early overfunding of the defined benefit plan is a factor in the long-term health of the plan.
A more defensible demand would be to remove the PS4 billion overfunding the Scots get, if that were redistributed around the UK on an equitable basis, Wales would get at least PS200m a year more.
The huge level of support led to the firm keeping the listing open, going into overfunding and allowing others to get involved.
In the case of overfunding, further production steps are planned.
UNT System is working with appropriate State agencies to determine whether overfunding occurred and whether reimbursement to the state may be necessary.
We find the estimated coefficients on PlanSize and interaction of tax and overfunding are significantly larger in the CB equation than in the DC equation, indicating larger plans and firms likely paying taxes choose to convert traditional plans rather than terminate.
The Ministry of Women's Affairs had found several "violations" in shelters run by aid agencies, including overfunding and corruption, as well as lack of discipline and poor quality of life, the acting minister for women's affairs, Husn Bano Ghazanfar, told reporters in Kabul.
More important, I contend this overfunding is limiting our ability to innovate, which has negative consequences for America's war fighting capabilities.
If these awards aren't coordinated effectively, institutions run the risk of overfunding some students while underfunding others.
Otherwise, overfunding (not from taxpayer contributions but from excess earnings) could be wasted.