overripeness


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to overripeness: underripe

o·ver·ripe

 (ō′vər-rīp′)
adj.
1. Too ripe.
2. Marked by decay or decline.

o′ver·ripe′ly adv.
o′ver·ripe′ness n.

overripeness

(ˌəʊvəˈraɪpnəs)
n
the state of being too ripe
References in periodicals archive ?
The coastal climate of Hawkes Bay obviously suits the variety, as the fruit is given a fresh lift of acidity, showing no sign of overripeness.
With extraction (diffusion) juice yield is less dependent on overripeness, but its quality is lower [3].
While the variety loves warm and sunny climes "If not cool enough at night the loss of acidity is an issue and often relegates the grape as a great blending partner'' because it has a tendency toward overripeness and high alcohol.
Much of the venerable gallery's ethos is predicted here, from the tone of amused overripeness, to the accent on instantaneity and life as cinematic.
These difficulties pale in comparison to the perils of overripeness.
5) Remains, however, uses the house to depict not the lush overripeness of Edwardian England, but a nation belatedly surviving its lost imperial splendor.
1) explained both of these phenomena by their hypothesis of preovulatory and postovulatory overripeness, and they claimed that it is more plausible than my hormonal hypothesis (3).
Some people do not like these due to a musty odor when they reach overripeness, but we find they make a delicious syrup for our sourdough pancakes.
In general, avoid melons with dents or bruises, and those that indicate overripeness with a lot of give, sloshing seeds, or a fermented scent.
Chapter 5 is in many ways the least problematic, mainly because Page is discarding an image that has already lost its attraction for musicologists (lengthy demonstrations to the contrary notwithstanding) - that of the late Middle Ages as a period of overripeness and decay as sketched by Johan Huizinga in The Waning of the Middle Ages (1919).