overstudy

overstudy

(ˌəʊvəˈstʌdɪ)
vb, -studies, -studying or -studied
to study (something) too much (so as to be disadvantageous)
References in classic literature ?
And now, before I take up my tale, I want to anticipate the doubting Thomases of psychology, who are prone to scoff, and who would otherwise surely say that the coherence of my dreams is due to overstudy and the subconscious projection of my knowledge of evolution into my dreams.
He no longer abused himself with short sleep, overwork, and overstudy.
52) There was clearly a double-standard determinism at work in Cabanis's theory on the relationship between "lower-organ" spasms and evidence of intelligence: elsewhere in the Rapports, he maintained that visceral weakness of the dyspeptic, melancholic variety was not just a consequence of overstudy but a prerequisite for intellectual talent in men.
There is no overstudy because Lowry is probably incapable.
In Earth in the Balance, protesting the stubborn denial of global warming, Gore wrote, "It is all too easy to exaggerate the uncertainty and overstudy the problem--and some people do just that--in order to avoid an uncomfortable conclusion.