overture


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o·ver·ture

 (ō′vər-cho͝or′)
n.
1. Music
a. An instrumental composition intended especially as an introduction to an extended work, such as an opera or oratorio.
b. A similar orchestral work intended for independent concert performance.
2. An introductory section or part, as of a poem; a prelude.
3. An act, offer, or proposal that indicates readiness to undertake a course of action or open a relationship.
tr.v. o·ver·tured, o·ver·tur·ing, o·ver·tures
1. To present as an introduction or proposal.
2. To present or make an offer or proposal to.

[Middle English, opening, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *ōpertūra, alteration (influenced by Latin cōperīre, to cover) of Latin apertūra, from apertus, past participle of aperīre, to open; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

overture

(ˈəʊvəˌtjʊə)
n
1. (Classical Music) music
a. a piece of orchestral music containing contrasting sections that is played at the beginning of an opera or oratorio, often containing the main musical themes of the work
b. a similar piece preceding the performance of a play
c. Also called: concert overture a one-movement orchestral piece, usually having a descriptive or evocative title
d. a short piece in three movements (French overture or Italian overture) common in the 17th and 18th centuries
2. (often plural) a proposal, act, or gesture initiating a relationship, negotiation, etc
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) something that introduces what follows
vb (tr)
4. to make or present an overture to
5. to introduce with an overture
[C14: via Old French, from Late Latin apertūra opening, from Latin aperīre to open; see overt]

o•ver•ture

(ˈoʊ vər tʃər, -ˌtʃʊər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. an initiating move in negotiating an agreement or action; proposal; offer.
2.
a. an orchestral composition introducing a musical work, as an opera.
b. an independent piece of similar character.
3. an introductory part; prelude; prologue.
v.t.
4. to submit as an overture or proposal.
5. to make an overture or proposal to.
[1300–50; Middle English < Old French]

overture


Past participle: overtured
Gerund: overturing

Imperative
overture
overture
Present
I overture
you overture
he/she/it overtures
we overture
you overture
they overture
Preterite
I overtured
you overtured
he/she/it overtured
we overtured
you overtured
they overtured
Present Continuous
I am overturing
you are overturing
he/she/it is overturing
we are overturing
you are overturing
they are overturing
Present Perfect
I have overtured
you have overtured
he/she/it has overtured
we have overtured
you have overtured
they have overtured
Past Continuous
I was overturing
you were overturing
he/she/it was overturing
we were overturing
you were overturing
they were overturing
Past Perfect
I had overtured
you had overtured
he/she/it had overtured
we had overtured
you had overtured
they had overtured
Future
I will overture
you will overture
he/she/it will overture
we will overture
you will overture
they will overture
Future Perfect
I will have overtured
you will have overtured
he/she/it will have overtured
we will have overtured
you will have overtured
they will have overtured
Future Continuous
I will be overturing
you will be overturing
he/she/it will be overturing
we will be overturing
you will be overturing
they will be overturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been overturing
you have been overturing
he/she/it has been overturing
we have been overturing
you have been overturing
they have been overturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been overturing
you will have been overturing
he/she/it will have been overturing
we will have been overturing
you will have been overturing
they will have been overturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been overturing
you had been overturing
he/she/it had been overturing
we had been overturing
you had been overturing
they had been overturing
Conditional
I would overture
you would overture
he/she/it would overture
we would overture
you would overture
they would overture
Past Conditional
I would have overtured
you would have overtured
he/she/it would have overtured
we would have overtured
you would have overtured
they would have overtured

overture

An orchestral introduction to an opera or ballet, sometimes to a symphony, or an independent and usually programmatic concert work.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.overture - orchestral music played at the beginning of an opera or oratoriooverture - orchestral music played at the beginning of an opera or oratorio
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
2.overture - something that serves as a preceding event or introduces what follows; "training is a necessary preliminary to employment"; "drinks were the overture to dinner"
inception, origination, origin - an event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events
3.overture - a tentative suggestion designed to elicit the reactions of othersoverture - a tentative suggestion designed to elicit the reactions of others; "she rejected his advances"
proffer, proposition, suggestion - a proposal offered for acceptance or rejection; "it was a suggestion we couldn't refuse"

overture

noun
1. (Music) prelude, opening, introduction, introductory movement the William Tell Overture
prelude finale, coda
2. (usually plural) approach, offer, advance, proposal, appeal, invitation, tender, proposition, opening move, conciliatory move He had begun to make clumsy yet endearing overtures of friendship.
approach withdrawal, rejection

overture

noun
1. A short section of preliminary remarks:
2. A preliminary action intended to elicit a favorable response:
advance (used in plural), approach.
Translations
مُقَدِّمَة أو إفْتِتاحِيَّةٌ موسيقِيَّه
ouverture
nyitány
forleikur
uvertiūra
uvertīra

overture

[ˈəʊvətjʊəʳ] N
1. (Mus) → obertura f
2. (fig) to make overtures to sb (Pol, Comm) → hacer una propuesta a algn; (sexual) → hacer insinuaciones a algn
they had made overtures to Pan Am, but without successle hicieron una propuesta a Pan Am, pero no se llegó a nada
the government made peace overtures to the rebelsel gobierno les hizo una propuesta de paz a los rebeldes

overture

[ˈəʊvərtʃʊər] n
(= music) → ouverture f
(verbal)ouverture f
peace overtures → des ouvertures de paix
overtures of friendship → des offres d'amitié
to make overtures to sb (= approaches) → faire des ouvertures à qn

overture

n
(Mus) → Ouvertüre f
usu pl (= approach)Annäherungsversuch m; to make overtures to somebodyAnnäherungsversuche bei jdm machen; peace overturesFriedensannäherungen pl

overture

[ˈəʊvəˌtjʊəʳ] n
a. (Mus) → ouverture f inv
b. to make overtures to sb (fig) (friendly) → comportarsi amichevolmente verso qn; (romantic) → tentare un approccio con qn, fare delle avances a qn

overture

(ˈəuvətjuə) noun
a piece of music played as an introduction to an opera etc.
References in classic literature ?
They chatted incessantly: about the things around them; their amusing adventure out in the water-it had again assumed its entertaining aspect; about the wind, the trees, the people who had gone to the Cheniere; about the children playing croquet under the oaks, and the Farival twins, who were now performing the overture to "The Poet and the Peasant.
It was in fact the very appropriate truth that she had ventured to criticize the propriety, to hint at the incongruity, of so close an alliance, and even to go so far on the subject as a frank overture to Miss Jessel.
Miss Garth left her when the overture began, sitting apart in a corner behind the scenes, serious and silent, with her smelling-bottle in one hand, and her book in the other, resolutely training herself for the coming ordeal, to the very last.
She was weary, not because of the past, but because the fairy theatre of life still kept its curtain down, and forced her to play over and over again the impatient overture of her dreams.
Vangard, to Right and Left the Front unfould; That all may see who hate us, how we seek Peace and composure, and with open brest Stand readie to receive them, if they like Our overture, and turn not back perverse; But that I doubt, however witness Heaven, Heav'n witness thou anon, while we discharge Freely our part: yee who appointed stand Do as you have in charge, and briefly touch What we propound, and loud that all may hear.
Her casuistry was interrupted by some one softly whistling a theme from the overture to Masaniello, popular at the college in the form of an arrangement for six pianofortes and twelve hands.
Gounod had conducted the Funeral March of a Marionnette; Reyer, his beautiful overture to Siguar; Saint Saens, the Danse Macabre and a Reverie Orientale; Massenet, an unpublished Hungarian march; Guiraud, his Carnaval; Delibes, the Valse Lente from Sylvia and the Pizzicati from Coppelia.
The overture to the second act began; and, at the first sound of the leader's bow across his violin, Franz observed the sleeper slowly arise and approach the Greek girl, who turned around to say a few words to him, and then, leaning forward again on the railing of her box, she became as absorbed as before in what was going on.
There was an ominous, clanging overture to the charge when the shafts of the bayonets rattled upon the rifle barrels.
This overture was certainly pacific; but Antoine and the Flathead were predisposed to hostility, and pretended to consider it a treacherous movement.
For any one with true dramatic instincts, it is only the Overture that is ended
Half a mile away, the regimental band was playing the overture to the Sing-song, for the men had been told that Bobby was out of danger.