overutilize

overutilize

(ˌəʊvəˈjuːtɪˌlaɪz) or

overutilise

vb (tr)
to use unsustainably
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References in periodicals archive ?
As this growing segment of the population struggles with a troubled transition from childhood through adolescence to adulthood--particularly in a complex health care environment that is not ready for adult survivors of previously terminal childhood diseases--they suffer poor outcomes and overutilize the health care system.
We will be held accountable for care across the continuum and will be paid only to the extent that we have a functioning system that does not overutilize services and cause waste.
Alternatively, some children with intermittent symptoms may overutilize acute care services once they are provided with both insurance and a diagnosis; for instance, a diagnosis of asthma may sensitize parents and heighten their anxiety about minor symptoms.
People who buy comprehensive first-dollar insurance overutilize.
Is it no wonder then that physicians have emerged from residency programs conditioned to overutilize in a fee-for-service health care delivery system when our training esteems high productivity and delays financial payoffs?
It is true that not all providers overutilize, but because most claims organizations do not analyze the performance of the providers treating their claimants, they do not know who the "overutilizers" are or how much they are truly costing.
If services are free, patients will overutilize them.
In their conclusion, Williams and Tarr note that "subnational units in federal systems more often underutilize their constitution-making competency than they overutilize it" (15).
These patients overutilize healthcare resources and provide nothing in return.
Employees, seeking to take advantage of their coverage, tend to overutilize the system, which also puts pressure on prices.
attempt to overutilize tax concessions while the authorities fight to
This distortion induces equipment users to overutilize equipment and to purchase too much service.