owl


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owl

 (oul)
n.
1. Any of various often nocturnal birds of prey of the order Strigiformes, having hooked and feathered talons, large heads with short hooked beaks, large eyes set forward, and fluffy plumage that allows for almost noiseless flight.
2. Any of several breeds of domestic pigeons having a very short beak somewhat like that of an owl and often a frill of feathers on the chest.

[Middle English owle, from Old English ūle, of imitative origin.]

owl

(aʊl)
n
1. (Animals) any nocturnal bird of prey of the order Strigiformes, having large front-facing eyes, a small hooked bill, soft feathers, and a short neck
2. (Breeds) any of various breeds of owl-like fancy domestic pigeon (esp the African owl, Chinese owl, and English owl)
3. a person who looks or behaves like an owl, esp in having a solemn manner
[Old English ūle; related to Dutch uil, Old High German ūwila, Old Norse ugla]
ˈowl-ˌlike adj

owl

(aʊl)

n.
1. any of numerous chiefly nocturnal birds of prey comprising the order Strigiformes, having a broad head with large, forward-directed eyes that are usu. surrounded by disks of modified feathers.
3. a person of owllike solemnity or appearance.
[before 900; Middle English oule, Old English ūle, c. Middle Low German, Middle Dutch ūle, Old Norse ugla; akin to Old High German ūwila (German Eule)]

owl

(oul)
Any of various birds of prey that are usually active at night and have a large head, large forward-facing eyes, a short hooked bill, and a flat round face.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.owl - nocturnal bird of prey with hawk-like beak and claws and large head with front-facing eyesowl - nocturnal bird of prey with hawk-like beak and claws and large head with front-facing eyes
bird of prey, raptor, raptorial bird - any of numerous carnivorous birds that hunt and kill other animals
owlet - young owl
Athene noctua, little owl - small European owl
horned owl - large owls having prominent ear tufts
great gray owl, great grey owl, Strix nebulosa - large dish-faced owl of northern North America and western Eurasia
Strix aluco, tawny owl - reddish-brown European owl having a round head with black eyes
barred owl, Strix varia - large owl of eastern North America having its breast and abdomen streaked with brown
Otus asio, screech owl - small North American owl having hornlike tufts of feathers whose call sounds like a quavering whistle
screech owl - any owl that has a screeching cry
scops owl - any of several small owls having ear tufts and a whistling call
spotted owl, Strix occidentalis - a large owl of North America found in forests from British Columbia to central Mexico; has dark brown plumage and a heavily spotted chest
hoot owl - any owl that hoots as distinct from screeching
hawk owl, Surnia ulula - grey-and-white diurnal hawk-like owl of northern parts of the northern hemisphere
Asio otus, long-eared owl - slender European owl of coniferous forests with long ear tufts
laughing owl, Sceloglaux albifacies, laughing jackass - almost extinct owl of New Zealand
barn owl, Tyto alba - mottled buff and white owl often inhabiting barns and other structures; important in rodent control

owl

noun
Related words
young owlet
collective noun parliament
Translations
بُومَةٌبومَه
sova
ugle
بوفجغد
pöllö
उल्लू
sova
bagoly
burung hantu
ugla
フクロウ
올빼미
pelėda
pūce
bufniţă
sovavýr
sova
buljinajejajejinasovaсова
ugglauv
นกเค้าแมว
сова
con cú

owl

[aʊl] N (= barn owl) → lechuza f; (= little owl) → mochuelo m; (= long-eared owl) → búho m; (= tawny owl) → cárabo m

owl

[ˈaʊl] nchouette f

owl

nEule f; wise old owlweise Eule

owl

[aʊl] n (small) → civetta; (big) → gufo
little owl → civetta notturna
long-eared owl → gufo comune
short-eared owl → gufo di palude

owl

(aul) noun
a type of bird that flies at night and feeds on small birds and animals.

owl

بُومَةٌ sova ugle Eule κουκουβάγια búho pöllö chouette sova civetta フクロウ 올빼미 uil ugle sowa coruja сова uggla นกเค้าแมว baykuş con cú 猫头鹰
References in classic literature ?
There was no sound abroad except the hooting of an old owl in the top of a water-oak, and the everlasting voice of the sea, that was not uplifted at that soft hour.
To him, and to the venerable House of the Seven Gables, does our story now betake itself, like an owl, bewildered in the daylight, and hastening back to his hollow tree.
Then, as he wended his way by swamp and stream and awful woodland, to the farmhouse where he happened to be quartered, every sound of nature, at that witching hour, fluttered his excited imagination, --the moan of the whip-poor-will from the hillside, the boding cry of the tree toad, that harbinger of storm, the dreary hooting of the screech owl, to the sudden rustling in the thicket of birds frightened from their roost.
It was a calm, sweet April night; there were no sounds but a few low notes of a nightingale, and nothing moved but the white clouds near the moon and a brown owl that flitted over the hedge.
So she watched them every hour of the day, and had learned to see like an owl at night to watch them then.
And they could all see the point except an owl that come from Nova Scotia to visit the Yo Semite, and he took this thing in on his way back.
The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about some- body that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn't make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me.
The hooting of a distant owl was all the sound that troubled the dead stillness.
Instead of the voices of her children, she hears by day the moans of the dove, and by night the screams of the hideous owl.
Up the broad flight of shallow steps, Monsieur the Marquis, flambeau preceded, went from his carriage, sufficiently disturbing the darkness to elicit loud remonstrance from an owl in the roof of the great pile of stable building away among the trees.
But his favorite pets were Dab-Dab the duck, Jip the dog, Gub-Gub the baby pig, Polynesia the parrot, and the owl Too-Too.
I passed by his garden, and marked, with one eye, How the Owl and the Panther were sharing a pie--'