oxymoron

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ox·y·mo·ron

 (ŏk′sē-môr′ŏn′)
n. pl. ox·y·mo·rons or ox·y·mo·ra (-môr′ə)
A rhetorical figure in which incongruous or contradictory terms are combined, as in a deafening silence and a mournful optimist.

[Greek (attested only in Latin sources) oxumōron, an expression that is witty because paradoxical, from neuter of *oxumōros, pointedly foolish : Greek oxus, sharp, keen; see oxygen + mōros, dull, foolish.]

ox′y·mo·ron′ic (-mə-rŏn′ĭk) adj.
ox′y·mo·ron′i·cal·ly adv.

oxymoron

(ˌɒksɪˈmɔːrɒn)
n, pl -mora (-ˈmɔːrə)
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) rhetoric an epigrammatic effect, by which contradictory terms are used in conjunction: living death; fiend angelical.
[C17: via New Latin from Greek oxumōron, from oxus sharp + mōros stupid]

ox•y•mo•ron

(ˌɒk sɪˈmɔr ɒn, -ˈmoʊr-)

n., pl. -mo•ra (-ˈmɔr ə, -ˈmoʊr ə)
a figure of speech that uses seeming contradictions, as “cruel kindness” or “to make haste slowly.”
[1650–60; < Late Greek oxýmōron, neuter of Greek oxýmōros pointedly foolish =oxý- oxy-1 + mōrós dull (see moron)]
ox•y•mo•ron•ic (ˌɒk si məˈrɒn ɪk) adj.

oxymoron

a rhetorical device or figure of speech in which contradictory or opposite words or concepts are combined for effect. — oxymoronic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

oxymoron

1. The use of contradictory terms together to create an effect, such as in ”sweet conqueror.”
2. A statement combining two conflicting terms for effect.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oxymoron - conjoining contradictory terms (as in `deafening silence')oxymoron - conjoining contradictory terms (as in `deafening silence')
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
Translations
oxymóron
oksymoron
refhvörf
oxymorum
oxímoro
oximoron
oxymorón
oxymoronsjälvmotsägelse
oksimoron

oxymoron

[ˌɒksɪˈmɔːrɒn] N (oxymora (pl)) [ˌɒksɪˈmɔːrə]oxímoron m

oxymoron

[ˌɒksɪˈmɔːrɒn] noxymore m

oxymoron

nOxymoron nt
References in periodicals archive ?
IN ASTRONOMY, you have to be comfortable with oxymorons.
In Sophomores and Other Oxymorons, Lubar writes in laugh-out-loud style about the problems of a teenager figuring out high school.
But since we're dealing in oxymorons, it will come as no surprise that the House of Lancaster appears to be based on an industrial estate at Bloxwich in the West Midlands.
Other single-word oxymorons include firewater, spendthrift, wholesome, superette ("large small"), Connecticut ("Connect.
Lately I have been pondering some "oxymetaphors," or oxymorons used as metaphors, which might do the job better.
I have no desire to drive those two oxymorons, "classic rock" and "young country," from the air.
You can't always get what you want," crooned activist-musician Doug Hartnett, as his band the Oxymorons ripped into the Rolling Stones classic and a set of equally appropriate tunes for dissenters on the first night of the George W.
THE Irish Secret Service, which costs pounds 750,000 a year, has been called one of the 'great oxymorons of our time', said Minister of State for Health and Children Mary Hanafin last week, debating Appropriations Bill.
Gay Republicans are not oxymorons, and they are not self-hating They are brave.
Benign neglect is one of those oxymorons, like Kenneth Galbraith's conventional wisdom, which is slipping into everyday vocabulary.
In particular, she examines Wright's use of language, and specifically oxymorons such as "living dead" to describe the people above ground, and "dark sunshine" to illustrate inversion of dark-light symbols.