p53


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p53

 (pē′fĭf′tē-thrē′)
n.
1. A protein that regulates normal cell growth and proliferation and prevents unrestrained division of cells whose DNA has been damaged, as from ultraviolet or ionizing radiation. The absence of functional p53, usually resulting from a genetic mutation, increases the risk of developing various cancers.
2. The tumor suppressor gene that codes for this protein. Also called TP53.

[p(rotein) 53, from its apparent molecular mass of 53 kilodaltons as extrapolated from its mobility during electrophoresis.]
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Recent data have shown that, in addition to losing transcriptional function, mutant P53 gains oncogenic functions termed GOF (gain of function) that drive cell migration, invasion, and metastases.
Immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of p53, MDM2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki67 in benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours.
The p53 gene plays a vital role in keeping the body healthy by stopping damaged cells from dividing.
Previous studies have demonstrated that p53 stops cancer from developing by sensing stress, such as DNA damage, and turning on genes that prevent cells from dividing.
p53 has been widely accepted as a powerful tumor inhibitor that can prevent or slow the spread of cancer cells by facilitating apoptosis.
Introgen has now analyzed additional head and neck cancer patients for the abnormal p53 molecular biomarker predictive of ADVEXIN activity.
A mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is an independent prognostic factor in predicting death from prostate cancer, according to results from the largest study of p53 ever performed in men with the disease.
While some diagnostic applications of the p53 gene remain in dispute, the therapeutic claims of this patent can never be reintroduced, according to the EPO proceedings.
It has been shown that p53 protein can accumulate in BBD such as intraductal hyperplasia with or without atypia, fibroadenomas, fibrocystic disease, and fibrosis (11-15) as well as in healthy tissue (16) and phylloides tumors (17).
P53 has been identified as a key anti-cancer agent, halting cell division, repairing damaged DNA, and triggering cell death.
The group discovered that in certain types of hereditary cancer, there were cases in which Chk2 showed genetic disorders, a phenomenon that does not occur with p53.