paced


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pace 1

 (pās)
n.
1. A step made in walking; a stride.
2. A unit of length equal to 30 inches (0.76 meter).
3. The distance spanned by a step or stride, especially:
a. The modern version of the Roman pace, measuring five English feet. Also called geometric pace.
b. Thirty inches at quick marching time or 36 at double time.
c. Five Roman feet or 58.1 English inches, measured from the point at which the heel of one foot is raised to the point at which it is set down again after an intervening step by the other foot.
4.
a. The rate of speed at which a person, animal, or group walks or runs.
b. The rate of speed at which an activity or movement proceeds.
5. A manner of walking or running: a jaunty pace.
6. A gait of a horse in which both feet on one side are lifted and put down together.
v. paced, pac·ing, pac·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To walk or stride back and forth across: paced the floor nervously.
b. To measure (a space) by counting the number of steps needed to cover a distance.
c. To walk (a number of steps) in so measuring a space.
2. Sports
a. To set or regulate the rate of speed for (a race or a competitor in a race).
b. To lead (one's team or teammates) with a good performance: paced her team to a victory with 18 points.
3. To advance or develop (something) for a particular purpose or at a particular rate: paced the lectures so as not to overwhelm the students.
4. To train (a horse) in a particular gait, especially the pace.
v.intr.
1. To walk with long deliberate steps.
2. To go at the pace. Used of a horse or rider.
Idiom:
pace (oneself)
To move or make progress at a sensible or moderate rate.

[Middle English, from Old French pas, from Latin passus, from past participle of pandere, to stretch, spread out; see petə- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·ce 2

 (pä′chā, -kā, pā′sē)
prep.
With the permission of; with deference to. Used to express polite or ironically polite disagreement: I have not, pace my detractors, entered into any secret negotiations.

[Latin pāce, ablative of pāx, peace; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pa′ce adv.
References in classic literature ?
So the young pair shook hands upon it, and then paced happily on again, feeling that their pleasant home was more homelike because they hoped to brighten other homes, believing that their own feet would walk more uprightly along the flowery path before them, if they smoothed rough ways for other feet, and feeling that their hearts were more closely knit together by a love which could tenderly remember those less blest than they.
Ned looked around for a reason for this, and observed a man, evidently of Spanish extraction, passing them as he paced up and down the deck.
The deepest sounds of the retiring and invisible column had ceased to be borne on the breeze to the listeners, and the latest straggler had already disappeared in pursuit; but there still remained the signs of another departure, before a log cabin of unusual size and accommodations, in front of which those sentinels paced their rounds, who were known to guard the person of the English general.