paced


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pace 1

 (pās)
n.
1. A step made in walking; a stride.
2. A unit of length equal to 30 inches (0.76 meter).
3. The distance spanned by a step or stride, especially:
a. The modern version of the Roman pace, measuring five English feet. Also called geometric pace.
b. Thirty inches at quick marching time or 36 at double time.
c. Five Roman feet or 58.1 English inches, measured from the point at which the heel of one foot is raised to the point at which it is set down again after an intervening step by the other foot.
4.
a. The rate of speed at which a person, animal, or group walks or runs.
b. The rate of speed at which an activity or movement proceeds.
5. A manner of walking or running: a jaunty pace.
6. A gait of a horse in which both feet on one side are lifted and put down together.
v. paced, pac·ing, pac·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To walk or stride back and forth across: paced the floor nervously.
b. To measure (a space) by counting the number of steps needed to cover a distance.
c. To walk (a number of steps) in so measuring a space.
2. Sports
a. To set or regulate the rate of speed for (a race or a competitor in a race).
b. To lead (one's team or teammates) with a good performance: paced her team to a victory with 18 points.
3. To advance or develop (something) for a particular purpose or at a particular rate: paced the lectures so as not to overwhelm the students.
4. To train (a horse) in a particular gait, especially the pace.
v.intr.
1. To walk with long deliberate steps.
2. To go at the pace. Used of a horse or rider.
Idiom:
pace (oneself)
To move or make progress at a sensible or moderate rate.

[Middle English, from Old French pas, from Latin passus, from past participle of pandere, to stretch, spread out; see petə- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·ce 2

 (pä′chā, -kā, pā′sē)
prep.
With the permission of; with deference to. Used to express polite or ironically polite disagreement: I have not, pace my detractors, entered into any secret negotiations.

[Latin pāce, ablative of pāx, peace; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pa′ce adv.
References in classic literature ?
Maggie's mother paced to and fro, addressing the doorful of eyes, expounding like a glib showman at a museum.
Soon his steady, ivory stride was heard, as to and fro he paced his old rounds, upon planks so familiar to his tread, that they were all over dented, like geological stones, with the peculiar mark of his walk.
The prisoner counted the measurement again, and paced faster, to draw his mind with him from that latter repetition.