pacing


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Related to pacing: Cardiac pacing

pace 1

 (pās)
n.
1. A step made in walking; a stride.
2. A unit of length equal to 30 inches (0.76 meter).
3. The distance spanned by a step or stride, especially:
a. The modern version of the Roman pace, measuring five English feet. Also called geometric pace.
b. Thirty inches at quick marching time or 36 at double time.
c. Five Roman feet or 58.1 English inches, measured from the point at which the heel of one foot is raised to the point at which it is set down again after an intervening step by the other foot.
4.
a. The rate of speed at which a person, animal, or group walks or runs.
b. The rate of speed at which an activity or movement proceeds.
5. A manner of walking or running: a jaunty pace.
6. A gait of a horse in which both feet on one side are lifted and put down together.
v. paced, pac·ing, pac·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To walk or stride back and forth across: paced the floor nervously.
b. To measure (a space) by counting the number of steps needed to cover a distance.
c. To walk (a number of steps) in so measuring a space.
2. Sports
a. To set or regulate the rate of speed for (a race or a competitor in a race).
b. To lead (one's team or teammates) with a good performance: paced her team to a victory with 18 points.
3. To advance or develop (something) for a particular purpose or at a particular rate: paced the lectures so as not to overwhelm the students.
4. To train (a horse) in a particular gait, especially the pace.
v.intr.
1. To walk with long deliberate steps.
2. To go at the pace. Used of a horse or rider.
Idiom:
pace (oneself)
To move or make progress at a sensible or moderate rate.

[Middle English, from Old French pas, from Latin passus, from past participle of pandere, to stretch, spread out; see petə- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·ce 2

 (pä′chā, -kā, pā′sē)
prep.
With the permission of; with deference to. Used to express polite or ironically polite disagreement: I have not, pace my detractors, entered into any secret negotiations.

[Latin pāce, ablative of pāx, peace; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pa′ce adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pacing - (music) the speed at which a composition is to be played
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
musical time - (music) the beat of musical rhythm
accelerando - a gradually increasing tempo of music; "my ear will not accept such violent accelerandos"
allegretto - a quicker tempo than andante but not as fast as allegro
allegro - a brisk and lively tempo
andante - a moderately slow tempo (a walking pace)
meno mosso - played at reduced speed; less rapid
rubato - a flexible tempo; not strictly on the beat
2.pacing - walking with slow regular stridespacing - walking with slow regular strides  
gait - a person's manner of walking
References in classic literature ?
The hours wore on; --Ahab now shut up within his cabin; anon, pacing the deck, with the same intense bigotry of purpose in his aspect.
He stuck the paper on a file, in an ill-humour, and Charles Darnay awaited his further pleasure for half an hour: sometimes, pacing to and fro in the strong arched room: sometimes, resting on a stone seat: in either case detained to be imprinted on the memory of the chief and his subordinates.
From the dining-room, of which, though already seen, and always to be seen at five o'clock, the general could not forgo the pleasure of pacing out the length, for the more certain information of Miss Morland, as to what she neither doubted nor cared for, they proceeded by quick communication to the kitchen -- the ancient kitchen of the convent, rich in the massy walls and smoke of former days, and in the stoves and hot closets of the present.
And, when she saw him in the evening, while she worked with her friend, slowly pacing the drawing-room for an hour together in silent thoughtfulness, with downcast eyes and contracted brow, she felt secure from all possibility of wronging him.
Before the guns an artillery sentry was pacing up and down; he stood at attention when the officer arrived, but at a sign resumed his measured, monotonous pacing.
To do your best, you also need to have a plan for the marathon itself that anticipates the details--warm up, pacing, first miles, first half, the final six miles and 385 yards.
The San Diego Zoo's furry white carnivores have taken to pacing back and forth in their new, $5 million Polar Bear Plunge enclosure, and zoo keepers say the drug could be used to alter the annoying behavior.
NYSE:MDT) today announced the start of an international clinical study to confirm the safety and efficacy of the Medtronic EnRhythm[R] MRI SureScan[TM] pacing system, the first-ever pacemaker system to be developed and tested specifically for safe use in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines under specified scanning conditions.
As you get better and better at pacing, you'll begin to relate pace to how you feel, and won't need a watch or distance markers to regulate your pace.
These pacing systems provide physiologic pacing adapted to the needs of individual patients, helping set new standards of care that reduce unnecessary pacing when the heart's natural conduction is present.
MANNHEIM, Germany -- Sorin Group Begins European Awareness Campaign on the Risks Associated with Unnecessary Pacing of the Right Ventricle
PAVE is the first large-scale study to show the benefits of biventricular pacing in non-heart failure patients.