padronism


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pa·dro·ne

(pə-drō′nē, -nā)
n. pl. pa·dro·nes (-nēz, -nāz) or pa·dro·ni (-nē)
1. An owner or manager, especially of an inn; a proprietor.
2. A person who exploitatively employs or finds work for immigrants, especially Italian immigrants.

[Italian, from Latin patrōnus, patron; see patron.]

pa·dro′nism n.

padronism

(pəˈdrəʊnɪzəm)
n
US a system of exploitative work controlled by a padrone
References in periodicals archive ?
See Robert Harney, "Montreal's King of Italian Labour: A Case Study of Padronism," Labour/Le Travailleur 4 (1979): 25-56.
Immigration historians will find less than they will want on the European and Mexican roots of padronism, but Peck considers these and his argument, after all, is that this was a modern system adapted to the exigencies of the chaotic North American labor market.
The L/LT articles on Italian immigrant workers in Canada and its body of literature: Robert Harney, "Montreal's King of Italian Labour: A Case Study of Padronism," 4(1979), 57-84; Bruno Ramirez, "Brief Encounters: Italian Immigrant Workers and the CPR, 1900-1930," 17 (Spring 1986), 9-27; Franca Iacovetta and Robert Ventresca, "Italian Radicals in Canada: a note on sources in Italy," 37 (Spring 1996), 205-220; Franca Iacovetta, "Manly Militants, Cohesive Communities, and Defiant Domestics: writing about Immigrants in Canadian Historical Scholarship," 36 (Fall 1995); and Robert A.