paedobaptist


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Related to paedobaptist: Infant baptism

paedobaptist

(ˌpiːdəʊˈbæptɪst)
n
a person who baptizes infants
References in periodicals archive ?
Frost were more sympathetic to Landmark ecclesiology and feared that cooperative endeavors would hamper the Baptist protest against Paedobaptist errors.
To accept letters from other churches, particularly Paedobaptist churches, is to deny the true teaching of the New Testament regarding a regenerate church.
The difference between the two circumstances is that the former concerns the effect of sin to nullify a previous baptism, which Hubmaier rejected (along with Cyprian), whereas the latter concerns the form of baptism being sanctioned by the ecclesia universalis, which Hubmaier believed was credobaptism and not the paedobaptist practice of an errant ecclesia particularis, as the Roman Catholic Church had become.
Whether they were being accused of millenarian aggression or literalistic passivity, Baptists were anathema to the political and theological theorists of the paedobaptist consensus.
His slow conversion to Baptist ideals grew out of dissatisfaction with his contemporaries' anxious defense of paedobaptist tradition: he "heard one man preach fifteen Sermons upon this subject.
Baptist polemic and paedobaptist resilience demonstrated that there was no room for any middle ground.
98) The book was an attempt to steal the theological high ground from the paedobaptist cause by appropriating the most compelling evidence cited in its defense--covenant theology.
9) The influence of Orthodox baptismal theology here has been pervasive, but among Western Protestant paedobaptist churches it has not led to a sequence of rites closely linked in time, but rather to a different kind of "integration".
See Stephen Wright's similar summary of Helwys's view of paedobaptist dissenters in The Early English Baptists, 1603-1649 (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2006), 52.
Though Congregationalists remained paedobaptists, full membership after baptism required a conversion narrative, and satisfying narratives were increasingly rare.
He first notes its Lollard antecedents and then examines the influence of two paedobaptists - the severely persecuted John Traske (who bequeathed a controversial movement with Judaizing tendencies to a much embarrassed Seventh-day people) and, more importantly, Theophilus Brabourne, a Norwich clergyman who provided them with a reasonably extensive and frequently cited theology for their beliefs and practice.