paedomorphic


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paedomorphic

(ˌpiːdəʊˈmɔːfɪk)
adj
(Biology) biology showing signs of paedomorphism
References in periodicals archive ?
While alizarin generally stains bones red, and methylene blue stains cartilage blue, this distinction is not always clear-cut in fishes, especially in larvae and paedomorphic or very small species.
While evolutionary theory typically considers the paedomorphic status as fixed once attained (e.
is apparently a paedomorphic species: its peculiar morphology is a result of heterochronic changes in its ontogeny.
One can regard the plant body of Phylloglossum as paedomorphic, as Wikstrom and Kenrick (1997) do, in that it produces so few leaves and only one root, and yet produces a strobilus with this minimal vegetative apparatus.
The topology recovered by Struck (2007) was reconstructed with the use of molecular and morphological characteristics with all non-adult characteristics utilized for paedomorphic lineages (Struck 2007:6, Fig.
Their topics include molecular systematics of Gobioid fishes, Gobiiformes of the Americas, amphidromy as a life cycle among tropical freshwater gobies, gobies as predator and prey, early development, planktonic and paedomorphic gobioids, and mudskippers as front runners in the modern invasion of land.
A new species of subterranean blind salamander from Austin, Texas and a systematic revision of central Texas paedomorphic salamanders.
Humans would have selected animals with paedomorphic or neotenic variations because they were more tractable.
The first occurrence of the paedomorphic derivative hydrozoan Eugymnanthea (Leptomedusae, Eirenidae) from Taiwan, with a report of a new host.
Fossil History of Amphiuma -- Although the fossil record of the paedomorphic salamander genus Amphiuma is limited, it dates back to the late Paleocene (8), approximately 54 Ma B.