pagoda


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pa·go·da

 (pə-gō′də)
n.
1.
a. A religious building of East Asia and Southeast Asia, especially a multistory Buddhist tower with overhanging eaves separating each level, erected as a memorial or shrine.
b. A stupa.
2. A structure, such as a garden pavilion, built in imitation of a multistory Buddhist tower.

[Portuguese pagode, perhaps from Tamil pagavadi, from Sanskrit bhagavatī, goddess, from feminine of bhagavat-, blessed, from bhagaḥ, good fortune; see bhag- in Indo-European roots.]

pagoda

(pəˈɡəʊdə) or

pagod

n
(Buddhism) an Indian or Far Eastern temple, esp a tower, usually pyramidal and having many storeys
[C17: from Portuguese pagode, ultimately from Sanskrit bhagavatī divine]

pa•go•da

(pəˈgoʊ də)

n., pl. -das.
a temple or sacred building of the Far East, usu. a tower having an upward-curving roof over each story.
[1625–35; < Portuguese pagode temple « Persian butkada (but idol + kada temple, dwelling)]

pagoda


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A Buddhist Indian, Southeast Asian or Chinese temple in the form of a tower, copied as a decorative building in Europe from the eighteenth century P’ai Lou, a highly decorated Chinese gateway.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pagoda - an Asian templepagoda - an Asian temple; usually a pyramidal tower with an upward curving roof
temple - place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deity
Translations
باغودا، مَعْبد في الشَّرق الأوسَط
pagoda
pagode
pagodi
pagoda
pagoda
pagóîa
pagoda
pagoda
chiền

pagoda

[pəˈgəʊdə] Npagoda f

pagoda

[pəˈgəʊdə] npagode f

pagoda

nPagode f

pagoda

[pəˈgəʊdə] npagoda

pagoda

(pəˈgəudə) noun
a Chinese temple, built in the shape of a tall tower, each storey of which has its own narrow strip of overhanging roof.
References in classic literature ?
Almost as flushed as she had been in my dream, she leaned over the edge of the bank and began to demolish our flowery pagoda.
China Sailor Rattle thy teeth, then, and pound away; make a pagoda of thyself.
already hanging on its little peg; the guitar-case quite at home on its heels in a corner; and everybody tumbling over Jip's pagoda, which is much too big for the establishment.
My eye followed the light cloud of her smoke, now here, now there, above the plain, according to the devious curves of the stream, but always fainter and farther away, till I lost it at last behind the miter-shaped hill of the great pagoda.
This done, we wait until the palace is half-way up, and then we pay some tasty architect to run us up an ornamental mud hovel, right against it; or a Down-East or Dutch Pagoda, or a pig-sty, or an ingenious little bit of fancy work, either Esquimau, Kickapoo, or Hottentot.
They say he commanded the giants to build him a sort of pagoda, rising higher and higher above all the stars.
From the willow walk projected a slight wooden pier ending in a sort of pagoda-like summer-house; and in the pagoda a lady stood, leaning against the rail, her back to the shore.
He had been building one of those piles of thought, as ramshackle and fantastic as a Chinese pagoda, half from words let fall by gentlemen in gaiters, half from the litter in his own mind, about duck shooting and legal history, about the Roman occupation of Lincoln and the relations of country gentlemen with their wives, when, from all this disconnected rambling, there suddenly formed itself in his mind the idea that he would ask Mary to marry him.
The villa was a roomy white house, which, as is the case with most continental houses, looked to an English eye frail, ramshackle, and absurdly frivolous, more like a pagoda in a tea-garden than a place where one slept.
Haviland," he added, stepping to his writing table, "this lacquered shrine, with its pagoda roof, has been attributed to Kobo-Daishi, and has stood upon the writing table of seven emperors.
Like silver, he thought to himself, like tinkling silver bells; and on the instant, and for an instant, he was transported to a far land, where under pink cherry blossoms, he smoked a cigarette and listened to the bells of the peaked pagoda calling straw-sandalled devotees to worship.
But Fun See was delightfully Chinese from his junk-like shoes to the button on his pagoda hat; for he had got himself up in style, and was a mass of silk jackets and slouchy trousers.