paid


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paid 1

 (pād)
v.
Past tense and past participle of pay1.

paid 2

 (pād)
v. Nautical
A past tense and a past participle of pay2.

paid

(peɪd)
vb
1. the past tense and past participle of pay1
2. put paid to chiefly Brit and NZ to end or destroy: breaking his leg put paid to his hopes of running in the Olympics.

pay1

(peɪ)

v. paid or (Obs. except for def. 18b) payed, pay•ing, v.t.
1. to discharge or settle (a debt, obligation, etc.), as by transferring money or goods, or by doing something.
2. to give over (money) in exchange for something.
3. to transfer money to (a person or organization) as compensation for work done or services rendered.
4. to defray (cost or expense).
5. to be profitable to: Your training will pay you well in the future.
6. to yield as a return: The stock paid six percent last year.
7. to reward or retaliate against, as for good, harm, or an offense.
8. to give or render (attention, respects, a compliment, etc.), as if due or fitting.
9. to make (a call, visit, etc.).
10. to suffer in retribution; undergo: to pay the penalty for a crime.
v.i.
11. to transfer money, goods, etc., as in making a purchase or settling a debt.
12. to discharge a debt or obligation.
13. to yield a return, profit, or advantage; be worthwhile: It pays to be courteous.
14. to give compensation, as for damage or loss sustained.
15. to suffer or be punished for something: to pay with one's life.
16. pay back,
a. to repay or return.
b. to retaliate against; punish.
17. pay off,
a. to pay (someone) everything that is due that person, esp. final wages.
b. to pay (a debt) in full.
c. Informal. to bribe.
d. to retaliate against; punish.
e. to result in success or failure.
18. pay out,
a. to distribute (money, wages, etc.); disburse.
b. to let out (a rope) by slackening.
19. pay up,
a. to pay fully.
b. to pay on demand.
n.
20. the act of paying or being paid; payment.
21. wages, salary, or a stipend.
22. paid employment.
adj.
23. operable or accessible on deposit of coins: a pay toilet.
24. pertaining to or requiring payment.
Idioms:
1. pay one's (own) way, to pay one's own share of the expenses; be self-supporting.
2. pay through the nose, to pay an exorbitant price.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Old French paier < Medieval Latin pācāre to satisfy, settle (a debt), Latin: to pacify (by force of arms). See peace]

pay2

(peɪ)

v.t. payed, pay•ing.
to coat or cover (seams, a ship's bottom, etc.) with pitch, tar, or the like.
[1620–30; < Middle French peier, Old French < Latin picāre to smear with pitch, derivative of pix (s. pic-) pitch2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.paid - marked by the reception of pay; "paid work"; "a paid official"; "a paid announcement"; "a paid check"
unpaid - not paid; "unpaid wages"; "an unpaid bill"
2.paid - involving gainful employment in something often done as a hobby
professional - engaged in a profession or engaging in as a profession or means of livelihood; "the professional man or woman possesses distinctive qualifications"; "began her professional career after the Olympics"; "professional theater"; "professional football"; "a professional cook"; "professional actors and athletes"
3.paid - yielding a fair profit
profitable - yielding material gain or profit; "profitable speculation on the stock market"

paid

adjective salaried, waged, rewarded, remunerated a well-paid accountant
Translations
placený
betalt
maksettu
plaćen
支払い済みの
유급인
betald
ได้จ่ายแล้ว
đã được thanh toán

paid

[peɪd]
A. PT & PP of pay
B. ADJ
1. [official] → asalariado, que recibe un sueldo; [work] → remunerado, rentado (S. Cone); [bill, holiday etc] → pagado
a paid hackun escritorzuelo a sueldo
2. to put paid to sth (Brit) → acabar con or poner fin a algo

paid

[ˈpeɪd]
pt
pp of pay
adj
[work] → rémunéré(e); [staff] → rémunéré(e)
[holiday] → payé(e)
3 weeks' paid holiday → trois semaines de congés payés
to put paid to sth (mainly British)mettre fin à qchpaid-up [ˌpeɪdˈʌp] adj
[member] → cotisant(e)
Over three million people in Britain are paid-up members of conservation groups → Plus de trois millions de personnes en Grande-Bretagne sont membres cotisants d'une association de protection de la nature.
[shares] → libéré(e)
paid-up capital → capital versé

paid

pret, ptp of pay
adj
official, workbezahlt; a highly paid jobein hoch bezahlter Posten; a highly paid managerein hoch bezahlter Manager, eine hoch bezahlte Managerin; paid leavebezahlter Urlaub
(esp Brit) to put paid to somethingetw zunichtemachen; that’s put paid to my weekenddamit ist mein Wochenende geplatzt or gestorben (inf); that’s put paid to himdamit ist für ihn der Ofen aus (inf), → das wars dann wohl für ihn (inf)
n the low/well paiddie Gering-/Gutverdienenden pl

paid

[peɪd]
1. pt, pp of pay
2. adj (work, official) → rimunerato/a
to put paid to sth (ruin) → metter fine a qc

pay

(pei) past tense, past participle paid verb
1. to give (money) to (someone) in exchange for goods, services etc. He paid $5 for the book.
2. to return (money that is owed). It's time you paid your debts.
3. to suffer punishment (for). You'll pay for that remark!
4. to be useful or profitable (to). Crime doesn't pay.
5. to give (attention, homage, respect etc). Pay attention!; to pay one's respects.
noun
money given or received for work etc; wages. How much pay do you get?
ˈpayable adjective
which may be or must be paid. The account is payable at the end of the month.
payˈee noun
a person to whom money is (to be) paid.
ˈpayment noun
1. money etc paid. The TV can be paid for in ten weekly payments.
2. the act of paying. He gave me a book in payment for my kindness.
ˈpay-packet noun
an envelope containing a person's wages. The manager handed out the pay-packets.
ˈpay-roll noun
1. a list of all the workers in a factory etc. We have 450 people on the pay-roll.
2. the total amount of money to be paid to all the workers. The thieves stole the pay-roll.
pay back
1. to give back (to someone something that one has borrowed). I'll pay you back as soon as I can.
2. to punish. I'll pay you back for that!
pay off
1. to pay in full and discharge (workers) because they are no longer needed. Hundreds of steel-workers have been paid off.
2. to have good results. His hard work paid off.
pay up
to give (money) to someone, eg in order to pay a debt. You have three days to pay up (= You must pay up within three days).
put paid to
to prevent a person from doing (something he planned or wanted to do). The rain put paid to our visit to the zoo.

paid

مُسْدَد placený betalt bezahlt πληρωμένος remunerado maksettu payé plaćen pagato 支払い済みの 유급인 betaald betalt opłacony pago оплаченный betald ได้จ่ายแล้ว ücretli đã được thanh toán 领工资的

paid

v. pp. de to pay, pagado.
References in classic literature ?
I've paid a hundred and fifteen my- self, within the week.
He was paid the fabulous sum of seventeen and a half cents an hour; and as it proved a rush day and he worked until nearly seven o'clock in the evening, he went home to the family with the tidings that he had earned more than a dollar and a half in a single day!
It is useless, my dear Monsieur Colbert," said D'Artagnan, who inwardly enjoyed this confusion in the ideas of Colbert; "my order is paid.
The wizened face of the man of law was twisted into a wrinkled smile, for in his pouch were fourscore golden angels that the Prior had paid him in fee for the case betwixt him and Sir Richard of the Lea.
If it hadn't been for that, I should have paid you a hundred pounds this morning.
All that is very well," said Don Quixote; "but let the shoes and the blood-lettings stand as a setoff against the blows you have given him without any cause; for if he spoiled the leather of the shoes you paid for, you have damaged that of his body, and if the barber took blood from him when he was sick, you have drawn it when he was sound; so on that score he owes you nothing.
Bashti paid him a visit ere the day was done, and talked with him earnestly.
Three days after the manifesto of President Barbicane $4,000,000 were paid into the different towns of the Union.
At the proper time he will put you in a cab or an omnibus, and drive you to the train or the boat; he has packed your luggage and transferred it, he has paid all the bills.
Then, Clara, as to the PRICE I have paid for this handkerchief," she said, "you ought to remember what the laws of political economy lay down on such subjects.
Not alone was his capital depleted by the amount of her value, but her earnings were no longer to be reckoned on, and it was her earnings that largely paid the running expenses of the plantation.
And, since first-class magazines always paid on acceptance, there was a check inside.