painterliness


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paint·er·ly

 (pān′tər-lē)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a painter; artistic.
2.
a. Having qualities unique to the art of painting.
b. Of, relating to, or being a style of painting marked by openness of form, with shapes distinguished by variations of color rather than by outline or contour.

paint′er·li·ness n.

painterliness

(ˈpeɪntəlɪnəs)
n
the quality of being painterly
References in periodicals archive ?
This is crucial, as the painterliness of Bacon's representation is often overlooked in exhibitions of his work in favour of thematic parallels.
At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Dahn eschewed large canvases, rejected painterliness entirely, and began producing works that were increasingly word-based, therefore establishing in his art a certain accord with Prince's Joke Paintings, which he began in 1987, or the canvases of Christopher Wool at his most woolen, not to mention Ed Ruscha--though, in comparison with these reasonable American models, Dahn's relatively recent work is far more obscure.
In many ways, Scheibitz is the archetypal contemporary painter, with a language which draws on modern masters from Mondrian to Picasso, an industrial colour palette which is completely of the 21st century, and a balance between intellectual rigour and an intuitive painterliness (Fig.
But on closer inspection, you're pulled into the depths of Mackprang's deft color sense, and above all, her painterliness.
From certain professors at Surikov, Kabakov became acquainted with a style of Russian art known as "Cezannism," which, although officially forbidden, was a practice based on a particular interpretation of Cezanne's work that focused upon balance and painterliness.
But I found my interest was stimulated more by reading about her in the catalogue, and in reading her impressive wartime poetry, than in looking at her paintings, which lean towards a Nash-like blend of dream image and painterliness without quite seeming to take off.
31 The relative virtues of painterliness and high finish were hotly debated in seventeenth-century Spain (McKim-Smith, 15-33).
O'Herlihy brings a neat painterliness to the work, an undogmatic, intuitive sense of composition which is very much to do with siting, textures and the quality of light.
So - on some level - I no doubt did sense the power of the painterliness of those pictures of winding country paths, working peasants, flower gardens, rooftops, the stillness of a summer day.
The painterliness of the panels is even further emphasised by contrast with the hard 'zip' or seam where they abut each other.
With their unexpected angles of vision and severe croppings, the pictures recall the scene and syntax of photography even as their monumental size and full-tilt color delight in painterliness.